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Knowledge in a Sentence

Let's face it; being able to speak multiple languages would be really cool. Here is a word in a sentence.


How to use knowledge in a sentence - some examples.

  • Even his wit and knowledge of the world were spoiled, and his affected gaiety was touched with sadness, by the odour of falsehood which escaped through every pore of his body."
  • Tom needs to gain more knowledge.
  • He has knowledge and experience as well.
  • It was his favorite memory, that which preceded his abrupt knowledge of war and the world at large.
  • Tom had an unusual thirst for knowledge.
  • The office of reason is to give a true and distinct appreciation of the values of goods and evils; or firm and determinate judgments touching the knowledge of good and evil are our proper arms against the influence of the passions.3 We are free, therefore, through knowledge: ex magna lute in intellectu sequitur magna propensio in voluntate, and omnis peccans est ignorans.
  • The treaty contained a clause by which Charles was bound to declare himself a Catholic, and with the knowledge of this Ashley, as a stanch Protestant, could not be trusted: In order to blind him and the other Protestant members of the Cabal a sham treaty was arranged in which this clause did not appear, and it was not until a considerable while afterwards that he found out that he had been duped.
  • Park himself added much to the knowledge of the upper basin of the Senegal.
  • The distinction between these two was made emphatic by Aquinas, who is at pains, especially in his treatise Contra Gentiles, to make it plain that each is a distinct fountain of knowledge, but that revelation is the more important of the two.
  • A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
  • He notably enriched our knowledge of curves and surfaces.
  • Such are the four points of Cartesian method: (1) Truth requires a clear and distinct conception of its object, excluding all doubt; (2) the objects of knowledge naturally fall into series or groups; (3) in these groups investigation must begin with a simple and indecomposable element, and pass from it to the more complex and relative elements; (4) an exhaustive and immediate grasp of the relations and interconnexion of these elements is necessary for knowledge in the fullest sense of that word.4 " There is no question," he says in anticipation of Locke and Kant, " more important to solve than that of knowing what human knowledge is and how far it extends."
  • " I can say with truth," he writes to the princess Elizabeth, 9 " that the principle which I have always observed in my studies, and which I believe has helped me most to gain what, knowledge I have, has been never to spend beyond a very few hours daily in thoughts which occupy the imagination, and a very few hours yearly in those which occupy the understanding, and to give all the rest of my time to the relaxation of the senses and the repose of the mind."
  • There was something else in her gaze, the knowledge that she'd figured out this Deidre wasn't the same one she was yesterday.
  • Twice, though the first time is not common knowledge.
  • Public knowledge noted the arrest resulted from yet another unidentified tip.
  • It's not common knowledge yet, Wynn whispered.
  • Perhaps it was the knowledge they were safe because of her.
  • She suspected part of it was the knowledge that Xander—and Sofi—believed her to be Darian's mate.
  • She hesitated at the head of the stairs, tormented by the knowledge her father was incapable of mercy towards his daughter, let alone a stranger.
  • "How?" he asked, hoping this wasn't secret knowledge she hadn't shared with him.
  • If Ritschl had clearly shown that judgments of value enfold and transform other types of knowledge, just as the "spiritual man" includes and transfigures but does not annihilate the "natural man," then within the compass of this spiritually conditioned knowledge all other knowledge would be seen to have a function and a home.
  • My knowledge of German is poor.
  • His brother was brought in and finally confessed, professing he had no knowledge of Jude's criminal activities.
  • She'd figure out his weakness and hold onto that knowledge for when she needed it.
  • She ached to respond but had to be satisfied with the knowledge he was alive.
  • He greatly increased his political information, and also acquired, from the study of the Bible and Shakespeare, a wonderful knowledge of English.
  • To the best of my knowledge, Tom can't swim.
  • Even if he wasn't directly involved, it's a small high school and booze parties are probably common knowledge.
  • The knight had a limited knowledge of swordplay, made obvious by how badly he was defeated in a duel against his rival.
  • However, his knowledge of us, and especially me, was either limited or incorrect.
  • My knowledge of French doesn't amount to much.
  • She didn't just have the body of a human and the knowledge of the goddess; she wanted to help him enough that she was willing to overcome her fear.
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  • Instead, she concentrated on figuring out what knowledge she could about the souls in the lake.
  • The kitchen was open all the time, but Alex didn't drink - or never had to her knowledge.
  • Revelation is a source of knowledge, rather than the manifestation in the world of a divine life, and its chief characteristic is that it presents men with mysteries, which are to be believed even when they cannot be understood.
  • His lack of technical knowledge kept him from being promoted.
  • To his knowledge, Gabriel never had, and the assassin was not one who would ever allow emotion to cloud his decisions.
  • the three applications of our knowledge to the outward world, to the human body, and to the conduct of life.'
  • To the former he owes his appreciation of exact investigation and a complete knowledge of the aims of science, to the latter an equal admiration for the great circle of ideas which had been diffused by the teaching of Fichte, Schelling and Hegel.
  • He has some knowledge of editing.
  • It seems impossible to deny that the tendency of his principles and his arguments is mainly in the line of a metaphysical absolute, as the necessary completion and foundation of all being and knowledge.
  • In respect cf hospitals and the treatment of the sick his energy and knowledge were of enormous advantage to his country, both in times of peace and of war, and the unrivalled accommodation for medical treatment possessed by Berlin is a standing tribute to his name, which will be perpetuated in one of the largest hospitals of the city.
  • I have no knowledge of the Japanese language, but being a native English speaker I have a great amount of knowledge in my own language. 
  • He acquired some knowledge about Ben.
  • It was general knowledge that Lori had been promiscuous in her youth.
  • The tiny victory felt good, almost as good as the knowledge that the sexy beast every woman on the planet drooled over wanted her.
  • understand theology must familiarize himself with Scripture, the teachings of the fathers, and the decisions of councils, in such a way as to be able to make part of himself, as it were, those channels along which this divine knowledge flowed.
  • I know this ally and arranged for her travel without Sirian's knowledge.
  • Television helps us widen our knowledge.
  • In this way we, as it were, bring the causal or primal term and its remotest dependent immediately together, and raise a derivative knowledge into one which is primary and intuitive.
  • All knowledge is not good.
  • And how would Nota and associates come by this knowledge in the first place?
  • I knew she remained frightened and I sensed his knowledge of the apparent closeness of the Delabama killer gave at least a modicum of comfort.
  • Stronger than his curiosity was the knowledge that he wanted nothing to do with whatever Jonny was planning, no doubt against the White God, his sworn enemy.
  • Albania is perhaps the least-known region in Europe; and though more than a hundred years have passed since Gibbon described it as "a country within sight of Italy, which is less known than the interior of America," but little progress has yet been made towards a scientific knowledge of this interesting land and its inhabitants.
  • My knowledge of Japanese is rather poor.
  • In reason, as in revelation, man can only attain to the lower kind of knowledge; there is a higher kind which we may not hope to reach.
  • Cynthia expressed concern that Fred's newly acquired knowledge that the bone fragment was human might jeopardize his court-imposed decree.
  • This treaty, however, was kept from public knowledge, and Ashley helped Charles to hoodwink parliament by signing a similar treaty on the 2nd of February 1672, which was laid before them as the only one in existence.
  • Verres may not have been quite so black as he is painted by Cicero, on whose speeches we depend entirely for our knowledge of him, but there can hardly be a doubt that he stood pre-eminent among the worst specimens of Roman provincial governors.
  • The conception will be made clearer when it is remembered that Aquinas, taught by the mysterious author of the writings of the pseudo-Dionysius, who so marvellously influenced medieval writers, sometimes spoke of a natural revelation, or of reason as a source of truths in themselves mysterious, and was always accustomed to say that reason as well as revelation contained two kinds of knowledge.
  • Sirian's knowledge of what happened when two demons possessed one host was not one he would dare share.
  • While she denied any knowledge of her phone number being in Shipton's room, Dean questioned if she was telling the truth.
  • This theory, he believed, would afford an explanation of every phenomenon whatever, and in nearly every department of knowledge he has given specimens of its power.
  • Examining next what immediately follows the knowledge of pure intellect, he will pass in review all the other means of knowledge, and will find that they are two (or three), the imagination and the senses (and the memory).
  • The knowledge left him calmer than when he arrived.
  • He has experience as well as knowledge.
  • And he's using that knowledge to his advantage... better disguises, changing his MO, carefully executing his abductions.
  • We've denied, honestly, we have no information or knowledge whatsoever and frankly, we weren't sure such a person existed.
  • The inquirer will find that the first thing to know is intellect, because on it depends the knowledge of all other things.
  • If it is not she I suspect she possesses knowledge of the one I seek, the one who is my target.
  • Knowledge is power.
  • My stomach knotted with the knowledge this might be our last chance.
  • I didn't know that was public knowledge.
  • She almost equalled her husband in knowledge, and infinitely excelled him in talent and in tact.
  • Tom's lack of knowledge was obvious.
  • My uncle has a good knowledge of French.
  • But Ryland's personal knowledge of her was limited to a couple rolls in the hay a dozen years ago.
  • He would do anything to protect her until that time, for only armed with that knowledge could he hope to rule.
  • Desire spiked through him at the knowledge that his mate was in his arms.
  • The mind is not for the sake of knowledge, but knowledge for the sake of the mind.
  • I realized too late I should have prepared her more for this day, when she would need the knowledge Sirian has denied her all these years.
  • There's less time between his killings and he seems to have used his new found knowledge down the road in Arkansas.
  • He will therefore devote all his care to examine and distinguish these three means of knowledge; and seeing that truth and error can, properly speaking, be only in the intellect, and that the two other modes of knowledge are only occasions, he will carefully avoid whatever can lead him astray."
  • The atomic theory has been of priceless value to chemists, but it has more than once happened in the history of science that a hypothesis, after having been useful in the discovery Present and the co-ordination of knowledge, has been aban- position doned and replaced by one more in harmony with later of the discoveries.
  • And loving him all the more with the increased knowledge.
  • She acquired a knowledge of French.
  • Talal says you have no knowledge of our war.
  • When you die and go to heaven, you have universal knowledge and understanding.
  • Second obstacle: surviving her first full day in an unfamiliar job working for someone with the uncanny knowledge that she was there for nefarious reasons.
  • Of the church in Ostia there is no authentic record before the 4th century A.D., though there are several Christian inscriptions of an earlier date; but the first bishop of Ostia of whom we have any certain knowledge dates from A.D.
  • A baby has no knowledge of good and evil.
  • He never questioned if Julie knowledge presented any kind of threat.
  • For during the year that elapsed before he left Swabia (and whilst he sojourned at Neuburg and Ulm), and amidst his geometrical studies, he would fain have gathered some knowledge of the mystical wisdom attributed to the Rosicrucians; but the Invisibles, as they called themselves, kept their secret.
  • This is the reassertion of a principle which the middle ages had lost sight of - that knowledge, if it is to have any value, must be intelligence, and not erudition.
  • Francis, who had been the early friend of Burke, supplied him with the personal animus against Hastings, and with the knowledge of detail, which he might otherwise have lacked.
  • To the best of my knowledge, no.
  • Darian was left out of whatever secret knowledge they shared.
  • He held that there were two sources of knowledge - the mysteries of Christian faith and the truths of human reason.
  • And yet, he couldn't deny that Deidre was back or at least, a woman who had the knowledge of the goddess and the body and heart of a human.
  • If you have the most knowledge on how to fix a car than anyone in your family, you should be the one to look into that weird noise the car is making. 
  • It gives no evidence of science, he remarks, to possess a tolerable knowledge of the Roman tongue, such as once was possessed by the populace of Rome.'
  • He made great contributions to the knowledge of Saadia, and planned a complete edition of Saadia's works in Arabic and French.
  • The only thing that has changed is your knowledge.
  • I have no knowledge about their plans.
  • It's my belief that knowledge is power.
  • My point is, lacking knowledge is sometimes safer than possessing it.