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Funny Golf Terms

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Funny Golf Terms 2019

 

  • Squirrel: When playing either a "Par 4" or a "Par 5" and your Tee shot does not land in the Fairway but instead ends up in the rough, it is to be considered "With-The-Squirrels"!
  • Actually it really means the player probably hit a good shot, but it wasn't quite "Good enough"!
  • Duffer: The derogatory term, "Duffer" is a Golf Slang term for an "inexperienced" or mediocre golfer. Another term similarly used is a "Hacker"!
  • Saddam Hussein: A Slang term associated with going from bunker to bunker. (Criminal-In-Hiding)
  • Tote (Golfer's): This Slang term is referring to an all-purpose bag that is designed to hang on the motorized Golf Cart. This is a weatherproof hand bag for carrying small personal items when on the golf course.
  • Duck Hook: A "Duck hook" is considered a severe "hook" to the left (usually caused by a closed clubface) and "ducks," sharply to the ground, running off to the golfer's left. Another term associated with a Duck Hook, is a "Snap Hook".
  • Jerk: The Golf Jargon term "Jerk" is expressed when a golfer who pulls a Putt left of his intended line or "Jerks" the golf shot left of the target.
  • Nuked: You have "Nuked" it when hitting a golf shot with a particular club and achieve your maximum distance for that particular club. (This is when you obtain a greater distance than your average or typical distance).
  • Greenies: Hitting a green in regulation: One shot on a par 3, two shots on par 4, three shots on a Par 5. Or the amount of Benjamins you win when you’re playing lights out.
  • Hosel Rocket: When golfers use the Golf Jargon words "Hosel Rocket", they are referring to a golf shot that takes off straight like a rocket and severely to the right. The shot is a "shank" which means the point of impact with the ball was directly on the "Hosel" of the club.
  • A Game: A golfer's best game which he/she is able to execute on a consistent basis.
  • Knife: The "Knife" is known otherwise as the "One Iron", probably the most difficult club in the bag to hit properly on a consistent basis. Usually, only Pro Golfers have this club in their bag.
  • Dance floor: Golf Terms relating to "Dance Floor" is commonly referring to the "Green" which has a very smoooooth surface!
  • Kitty Litter: The term "Kitty litter" is referring to a sand bunker. Also known as a "Cat Box".
  • Waggle: As part of their Pre-Shot Routine, some Golfers will move the club head back and forth above the ball before beginning the takeaway. This action is commonly known as a "Waggle".
  • Dew Sweepers: "Dew sweepers" is a reference to players in a Professional Tournament who, in the third or fourth round of the tournament, have the earliest Tee times when the "Dew" is still on the Golf Course!
  • Whiff: A term used to describe a complete miss of the ball with a very poor golf swing.
  • Jungle: In Golf Language terms, "Jungle" is referring to a ball hit into the deepest and rough area on the golf course.
  • Gimme: In non-tournament play, a "Gimmie" refers to a Putt that playing partners agree can count automatically without actually being played. A (Tap-In") Therefore, conceding the score for that Putt.
  • Lag: The term "Lag" denotes the occasion when a player has a very long Putt to the Hole, and is hoping to get the ball within "Tap-In" range (1-2 feet). Actually, I think a player should believe they can make even the longest Putt, rather than to just "Get-It-Close"!
  • Pin high: A Golf Language term relating to the final resting place of the ball relative to the Flagstick. Even if your ball lands off the Green to the left or right, you can still find your ball even (front to back) with the Hole, which is known as "Pin High".
  • Knockdown: The "Knockdown" golf shot is executed when a low-trajectory is required, like hitting from the rough and having to clear low-hanging branches. Normally the ball is positioned towards the back foot, and an abbreviated follow-through is utilized.
  • Swing Oil: Beer.
  • Sunday Ball: A "Sunday ball" is considered the same thing as a "Do-Over" or a "Lunch Ball", and similar to taking a "Mulligan".
  • Goat Track: When a golf course is in poor condition, the derogatory term "Goat track" is sometimes used for that course. It is also known as a "Dog track".
  • Lorena Bobbitt: A really bad slice (makes the fellas cringe just thinking about it).
  • Quick: Rushing your swing or trying to hit too hard is known as being "Quick". This usually ends of being a poor golf shot.
  • Ugly: A slang term used when bad things happen during a poor golf shot. These shots are known as being quite "Ugly". Those shots are first cousins to Mr. "Skank" and Mr. "Flub"!
  • Lay up: To "Lay Up" is a term applied when it is much safer to hit a drive or fairway shot short of the Green, because trying to reach the Green could be a risky shot. (Like when there is a sandtrap or creek running near the front of the Green).
  • Nineteenth Hole: Within Golf Terminology this is a term referring to the "Clubhouse Bar" visited after an 18-Hole round of golf. This is where golfers can talk about the one that "Got Away"!
  • Big Dog: A slang term for the "Driving" club. Golfer's use this expression, "Time to let the big dog eat", when they finally decide to use the driver instead of a higher lofted and shorter club.
  • Mud Ball: A devilish situation where mud has caked itself onto your golf ball making it nearly impossible to tell which direction it will go.
  • Grow teeth: This is a Slang term used for when a golfer begs the ball to "stop quickly"! 
  • OB: This Slang term stands for "Out-Of-Bounds". (Definitely a place to avoid)
  • Teel-Putt: A Slang term used when the players third putt also fails to fall in the "Cup". So named after a Mr. Kevin Teel.
  • Dance Floor: Also known as the green, it’s that place you want your golf ball doing a tango with the pin. If your ball is on the very edge of green, you are on the dance floor, but cannot hear the band.
  • Halve: In the match play format, when opponents tie a hole or a bet (front nine, back nine or overall), the opponents split the point resulting in each side earning ½ point. Sharing sucks.
  • Iffy lie: The term "Iffy Lie" is referring to a ball that is in a poor lie, and is questionable as to whether the ball can be struck well for a good golf shot.
  • Knockdown: A golf shot with a lower ball flight, usually played to keep it out of the wind.
  • Tips: The back tees, where the PGA pros play from and where your alter ego thinks it plays from.
  • Reload: To "Reload" is akin to taking a "Mulligan" from the Tee Box. It means taking a second shot from the Tee after a poor first shot. These shots are also known as a "Do-Over".
  • DNF / DFL: The first is an acronym for not finishing a hole or tournament (Did Not Finish) while the second is a way to say you finished last (as in Dead F@&$ing Last).
  • On fire: Remember that one day a few months ago when you were "In-The-Zone" and the game was easy and you couldn't miss? Well golf language says that you were "On Fire"! 
  • Launched: A Golf Term commonly used while driving off the tee; the golfer "Kills" the ball with a smash that causes it to take off like a "Cruise Missile".
  • Fan: A "Slang Term" meaning to miss the ball completely. Also known as a "Whiff" (this in tournament play, counts as a stroke).
  • Army Golf: Going from the left side of the hole to the right, then back to the left again (left, right, left… get it?).
  • Watery Grave: Better known in Slang terms as a final resting place for your "Miss-Hit" shot over a water hazard.
  • Victory lap: A slang term for the "Circle" a Putt makes around the rim of the "Cup" before actually falling in!
  • Pin-seeker: Hitting a ball straight for the flagstick is hitting a "Pin-Seeker". The ball acts like a "Heat-Sensing" guided missile.
  • Tee Way Back: Chinese for a long yardage Golf Hole. Usually the Professional Tee Box location.
  • Knee-knocker: The Golf Jargon term "Knee-Knocker" is denoting a nervous reaction of the golfer when they have a short putt (3 to 4 feet) remaining for the next Putt.
  • Valleys: A slang term referring to relatively flat areas between mounds on a green with sharp undulations.
  • Short stick: The term "Short Stick" is in reference to the "Putter", as it is the shortest club in the bag.
  • Banana Ball: A golf slang term for a very sharp fade shot known as a "slice". The ball travels in a "banana-shaped" curve.
  • Cuban: A term relating to the putting action where the ball stops just short of dropping into the "Cup". The ball "Needs One More Revolution"!
  • Flop shot: A golf shot which is hit quite high and short, which upon contact with the Green, rolls very little and stops. The ball is "Flopped" onto the putting surface.
  • Wormburner: A golf shot that never leaves the ground. Also known as a Snakeraker or Bughugger.
  • Duck hook: A really, really, really bad snap hook often accompanied by your golf buddies’ quacking sounds. As Lee Trevino once said, “You can talk to a fade, but a hook won’t listen.” The duck hook even talks back.
  • Texas wedge: In Texas, where hard, dry conditions make it less risky to putt from off the green, a golfer will tend to utilize their Putter for the stroke at hand. The Putter is then considered a "Texas Wedge".
  • Double Eagle: A hole played three (3) strokes under Par. Also known as an "Albatross". Double eagles almost always occur on par five holes when a golfer "Holes" their second shot.
  • Press: When a golfer chooses to open a new bet if they are down two or more holes on a current bet. If the golfer starts playing better after they press, the bets will cancel out and he or she will lose less money. Only used in match play formats, like Nassau.
  • Lumberjack: When a golfer hits a ball into the woods among the trees several times during a round, and particularly when they continue to hit more trees trying to escape the wooded area, they are considered a "Lumberjack".
  • Carpet: A common term referring to the "Green".
  • Breakfast ball: An unofficial rule of golf that gives you a free mulligan on the first tee. For many golfers, it’s the most important meal of the day.
  • Die It in the hole: On the putting green, when putting the ball towards the hole and it loses the last of its momentum, but still drops into the "Cup", it is referred to as "Die It in the Hole"
  • Hung it out: When a golfer attempts to hit a draw but instead hits a straight shot, he is said to have "Hung It Out".
  • Skank: The Slang term "Skank" refers to a very poor golf shot. This term is similar to a "Flub".
  • Dribbler: A shot that "Dribbles" forward only a few feet, usually without getting airborne. (This is commonly termed a "Fat Shot" as well.
  • Sharkie: Hitting the ball in the water, and still managing to make a par. The great white ain’t scaring you.
  • Hosel Rocket: The most violent of shanks where a player hits the golf ball off the hosel (the rounded base of the shaft) instead of the clubface, and it flies off in an unpredictable, and often disastrous, direction.
  • Air mail: When a golf shot travels (like a jet airliner) and flies much further than planned.
  • Jaws: When a player says "He left it right in the jaws", he means his Putt stopped just short of falling in the "Cup". That yearning chasm between the final resting place of the ball and the Hole can sometimes be devastating to a player when high stakes are involved.
  • Dog Track: When a golf course is in poor condition, the derogatory term "Dog track" is sometimes used for that course. It is also known as a "Goat track".
  • Ted Kennedy: A golf shot that’s hit way to the left.
  • Coast-to-Coast Flight: A ball that is hit from one green-side bunker to a bunker on the opposite side of the putting green.
  • Dammit: Nothing clever here, but undoubtedly the most common and beloved golf term.
  • In the Leather: The Golf Slang phrase "In the Leather" is denoting that a putted ball is close enough to the hole to be conceded by the other players. That distance from the Hole, is the length between the "Hosel" of the club head and the beginning of the hand grip on the end of the Putter.
  • Velcro: When used as a slang term in golf, "Velcro" refers to the speed of the Putting Green on a golf course. "Velcro Greens" are ones that are very slow, like maybe a 5-6 Stimp-speed rating. 
  • U-turn: A slang term referring to a Putt that rolls almost all the way around the edge of the "Cup" before actually coming out and around without falling in.
  • Adolf Hitler: Two shots in the bunker
  • In his bag: A golf term meaning that a golfer has a "Go-To-shot" capability under certain circumstances with a particular club. The golfer considers this shot "In His Bag". Maybe we should say in his bag of "Tricks"!
  • Three Jack: The dreaded 3-putt. Hey, it beats a four jack.
  • Cabbage: A term referring to hitting the ball into very deep and inescapable thick rough. Also called spinach.
  • Robbed: The Slang word "Robbed" is commonly used by a player who has just barely missed making a successful golf shot. The player contends that "Lady Luck" bailed out on him.
  • That Dog Will Hunt: A complement given to a well-struck tee shot.
  • Up and down: The term "Up-And-Down" is referring to being able to come out of a difficult or "tricky" situation in your Short Game, and still finish with a Par Score.
  • Auto-Press: Same thing as a press, but the bet is automatically started when the golfer is down two holes to his or her opponent. Things can get messy if you start playing poorly and multiple presses open!
  • Rush Limbaugh: A golf shot that’s hit way to the right.
  • Twigs: A set of golf clubs sometimes are referred to as "Twigs" or "Sticks".
  • Weekend warriors: This slang term refers to Golfers who play infrequently, so called because the only time they can play is on "Weekend".
  • Scratch: A Slang term meaning a golfer who has a Handicap of "Zero".
  • Kick: When a golfer asks for a good "Kick", they are hoping for a positive "Bounce" of the ball into a good position for the next golf shot.
  • Mulligan: The term "Mulligan" is referring to a second shot from the Tee, after a poor first shot. These shots are also known as a "Do-Over". These 2nd shots are not legal in tournament play. Sometimes amateur players will agree before hand to have one Mulligan per each nine holes on a Tee shot.
  • Short grass: Better known as the "Fairway". Just outside the fairway is the "First Cut" (a little longer grass), and further outside yet is the "Rough" (much longer grass and weeds).
  • Stiff: When you hit your approach shot very close to the pin, you’ve stiffed it. Stiffing an iron is applauded, stiffing the cart girl is not.
  • Foot Wedge: Golf Terms referring to "Foot wedge" is slang for a way to assist a golfer in cheating his way out of trouble! It is where the golfer uses his "foot" to nudge the ball into a better lie.
  • Hand Wedge: The term "Hand wedge" is jargon term for a way to assist a golfer in cheating his way out of trouble! It is where the golfer uses his "hand" to nudge the ball into a better lie.
  • Lip out: Within Golfing Terms, "Lip Out" is used when a Putt hits the "Lip" of the Cup, and "spins out".
  • Looping: The term "Looping" is another term denoting "Caddying". To perform a "Loop" is a slang term referring to one 18-Hole circuit around the Golf Course.
  • Milk the Grip: "Milk the Grip" is a description of an action resembling the "Milking of a Cow" as applied to repeatedly tightening and loosening the hand grip on the club prior to executing the Swing. The golfer is trying to get just the right grip pressure.
  • Buzzard: The term "buzzard" is a synonym for a "Double Bogey" or two strokes over Par on any individual golf hole.
  • X (Sorry no "X" terms available)
  • Hooding the Club: The term "Hooding the Club" refers to a golfer who wants the ball to have a much lower trajectory with greater distance. The player tilts the club head forward to reduce the club's loft, and moves the hands ahead of the ball before initiating the golf swing.
  • Cat Box: The term "Cat box" is commonly referred to as a sand bunker. (The sand resembles the "Litter" used in cat boxes).
  • Sandies: Getting up-and-down from the bunker (sand trap).
  • Gardening: When you have to fix a divot or repair a ball mark.
  • Flub: A "Flub Shot" is basically a poor, disastrous golf shot which inevitably causes a loss in scoring!
  • Flyer: A golf shot that literally flies too far. Usually the result of catching a “flyer lie,” when grass gets trapped between the clubface and ball at impact, impeding the grooves on your club to spin the ball. You can spot a “flyer lie” when you see thick rough growing in the same direction as the intended flight of your ball.
  • Mickey Mouse course: Within Golf Glossary terms, "Mickey Mouse Course" is usually associated with a course with numerous short holes, poor maintenance, and a bad example of a Golf Course.
  • Double Cross: When you try to hit a fade but end up hitting a hook and then all hell breaks loose.
  • Barkies: Specifically, a slang term for hitting trees, but obtaining a good score in spite of it. On a drive where the ball travels into the woods and hits the trees, you could say the golfer got a lot of "good wood" on that shot. Oak, elm, pine…….
  • Snowman: The slang term "Snowman" in golf is a score of "8" on any particular golf hole. The connation is for the likeness to a "Snowman", one large ball of snow atop another.
  • Chili-Dip: When you chunk a chip.
  • Zone (In-The): Playing "In-The-Zone" is similar to "Being-In-The-Moment", which means you are completely relaxed, thinking only of the target, and are on "Auto-Pilot" with your swing mechanics!
  • Chicken Stick: A play-it-safe club is known as a "Chicken stick". When faced with a tough or delicate shot, a golfer will choose a club that is within his capabilities to properly execute the shot.
  • Back Door: The term "Back Door" is in reference to the far side of the putting "Cup". When approaching the hole, the putted ball catches the rim of the cup and curls around about half of the hole before falling in the "back" side.
  • Four-jack: A Golf Slang term for taking "four putts" to get the ball in the hole on any given Green.
  • Dawn patrol: The Golf Slang term "dawn patrol" refers to golfers who tend to play at sunrise. "Dawn patrol" is similar to "Dew Sweepers".
  • Hanging: A term denoting a "Lie" when the ball is located above the player's feet.
  • Can: A term referring to the Hole or "Cup" on the Green. Having "Canned" the putt, he won the tournament.
  • U.S.G.A.: Not to be confused with the United States Golf Association, this stands for “ugly shot, go again.”
  • The Tips: "The tips" is a Slang term for the Championship Tees on a golf course.
  • Barkie: Hitting a tree and still making a par.
  • Chunk: "Chunk" refers to a type of contact where the club hits the ground behind the ball before impact. Also known as a "Fat" shot. The club actually digs deeply into the turf behind the ball, taking a rather large divot or "Chunk" of turf.
  • Beach: "Beach" is a golf slang term for a sand bunker.
  • Backhander: Casually striking the ball with the back-side of the putter to "Hole" a very short putt.
  • Muff: A Golf Terms associated with a "Mishit" or a "Flubbed" golf shot.
  • Hot: The Golf Jargon term "Hot" denotes a low-trajectory, high rate of speed golf shot with little backspin.
  • Tap in: A "Tap-In" is a short, easy to make Putt. Usually the Putt partners will concede.
  • Pinseeker: When your golf shot never leaves the pin.
  • Yank: This term is used when a Putt is pulled sharply to the left.
  • Quail high: A golf shot poorly hit that flies very low to the ground. A "Quail-High" shot flies like a Quail. This type of hit is also referred to as a "Worm-Burner".
  • Bag rat: The term "Bag Rat' is a derogatory comment referring to the Caddy.
  • Wormburner: A poorly hit golf shot that never gets but a few feet off the ground. This term is similar to a "Quail" shot. 
  • Back Nine: The last nine holes on an 18-Hole golf course. Playing the "Back Nine" is referred to as "Heading In" (towards the Clubhouse).
  • Chicken Stick: The one club in your bag that you can always rely on, your go-to safety club.
  • Frog Hair: "Frog hair" is a golf slang term for the Apron or Fringe, which is the closely mown grass surrounding the Green.
  • Mouth Wedge: Sometimes amateur golfers will try to gain an edge by intentionally needling or annoying other players in their group with excessive talking that will affect the other players play. That golfer will earn the "Tag" of Mr. "Mouth Wedge".
  • K P: The Golf Term "K P" is a commonly used abbreviation for "closest to the pin. Really, the abbreviation should be "C P"! But what do I know?
  • Rainmaker: A "rainmaker" is a golf slang term describing a golf shot with a very high trajectory. It is so high it seems to reach the clouds where the "Rain" resides!
  • Lay the Sod: When you take a huge divot.
  • Grain: The direction in which the grass is growing on the greens; putts can be down grain, side grain and/or against the grain all of which affect the roll of your golf ball. Not to be confused with that stuff in your buddy’s flask.
  • Yips: A slang term concerning a nervous disorder that afflicts some players during their "putting stroke" on the green.
  • Platypus: Hitting a ball out of bounds and still making par. Platypuses aren’t normal and neither is making par after hitting one O.B.
  • Afraid Of The Dark: A putted ball which refuses to fall in the hole.
  • Fried Egg: A golf ball buried in the bunker. Upon entering the bunker to hit this shot, we suggest asking your foursome “where’s my side of bacon?”
  • James Joyce: A putt that’s nearly impossible to read.
  • Flusher: A putt that circles the entire cup, then goes in. You might need to wipe after that one.
  • Cart Jockey: "Cart jockey" is a term usually used in reference to a Golf Club staff person whose job it is to manage the course's motorized golf carts.
  • Tight: This is a Slang term for "Hardpan". In other words there is very little grass under the ball, and usually only "Dirt". In this case you have a "Tight Lie".
  • Yanked It: Another way to say you pulled a golf shot.
  • Nip it: The Golf Slang term "Nip It" means to hit an iron shot without taking a divot. This is a "clean" hit which tends to reduce the amount of backspin.
  • Albatross: The rarest of all birds, an albatross is playing the hole three under par (like making a 2 on a par-5, or acing a par-4). For most, it’s an endangered species.
  • Ready golf: "Ready Golf" is a method of playing the game of golf. It means whichever player is "Ready" to play, goes ahead and hits disregarding the "who's away" ruling.
  • Hacker: The derogatory term, "Hacker" is a Golf Jargon term for an "inexperienced" or mediocre golfer. Another term similarly used is a "Duffer"! When using the term "Hacker", it is generally meant as an insult, and therefore harsher and more critical than "Duffer".
  • Ace: Hitting the ball directly from the Tee into the hole or "Cup" with one swing of the club. It is usually executed on a Par three (3). Also known as a "Hole-In-One".
  • Many times a low-lofted club such as a 3-Iron or even the Driver is used on occasion for this type of shot.
  • Sandbagger: Refers to a golfer who is better than his or her handicap would suggest. Beware of thieves.
  • Kill: To "Kill" the ball is a term expressed when a player "Murders" or "Hits" the ball with great force.
  • Chippie: Chipping in from around the green.
  • Flatstick: "Flatstick" is a Slang term for a Putter, because the face of the typical putter has only about a 3-4 degree loft, which is very close to "Flat".
  • Juicy lie: A term indicating that the "Lie" of the ball in the "Rough" is sitting on top of the grass (almost as if it is mounted on a short Tee) and offers an opportunity for a nice clean hit.
  • Sampler: A box of golf balls featuring one sleeve of every type a Ball Manufacturer makes.
  • Inside the Leather: Refers to the imaginary distance that makes a putt a gimmie or not (it can vary depending on how nice your golf buddies are). The more money you have on the line, the smaller the circle of friendship.
  • Tester: A term applied to a situation where a Putt is to too far away for a "Gimmie", but short enough so that a good putting Golfer should hole it, so called because it tends to test a Golfer's skill.