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Quizzes

Take the latest and most popular trivia quizzes


Questions and answers for trivia quizzes and pub quizzes.

  • Name the world’s largest ocean. Pacific.
  • What is the first letter on a typewriter? Q
  • In which shop can you buy books in England? bookshop
  • What is rum distilled from? Sugar cane.
  • Name the Spartan king who married Helen of Troy. Menelaus.
  • How many avenues radiate from the Arc de Triomphe in Paris? 12
  • Name the Chinese game played with small tiles. Mah-jong.
  • How many coloured balls are there in billiards? 15
  • What are the four types of teeth? Molars, pre-molars, incisors and canine.
  • Name the French blue cheese made from ewe's milk. Roquefort.
  • What did the 7 dwarves do for a job? miners
  • Which hormone controls the supply of sugar between muscles and blood?Insulin.
  • How many squares are there on a chess board? 64
  • What is the Chinese system of medicine called, which uses slender needles inserted into the body at specific points? Acupuncture.
  • Which common household item, usually found in a kitchen or utility room, did Hamilton Smith invent in 1858? Washing machine.
  • What nation was bounced from the Organisation of American States in 1962? Cuba.
  • How many days does a cat usually stay in heat? Five.
  • What is the main language in Albania? Tosco
  • What are the Sun, the Independent and the Guardian? newspapers
  • The Shatt-el-Arab (River of Arabia) is the confluence of which two other rivers? Tigris And Euphrates
  • In which city is Hollywood? Los Angeles
  • What have been cooked in syrup and glazed to make the sweetmeat Marrons Glaces? Sweet Chestnuts
  • Who invented a system of shorthand based on sounds, not letters? Sir Isaac Pitman.
  • the popular piano piece known as Claire de Lune was composed by whom? Debussy.
  • Did Neil Armstrong put his l. or his r. foot on the moon first? left
  • How many colours are there in a rainbow? 7.
  • In which war was the Battle of Bunker Hill fought? American War Of Independence
  • What does the roman numeral C represent? 100
  • Name the craft of knotting threads to create decorative yet useful objects.Macrame.
  • In which 1979 film was the spaceship called Nostromo? Alien
  • What in Cornwall is the most southerly point of mainland Britain? Lizard Point
  • If you were eating Dubarry, what would you be eating? Cauliflower soup.
  • Name the train which was designed and driven by George Stephenson?Locomotion No.1.
  • Which fictional character was also known as Lord Greystoke? Tarzan.
  • Which book featured the eloi and the morlocks? The Time Machine.
  • Who invented the jet engine?Frank Whittle.
  • Before pirates used it, whose ships flew the skull and cross-bones flag? Knights Templar.
  • What continent is cut into two fairly equal halves by the Tropic of Capricorn? Australia.
  • In the 1963 film The Great Escape, what names were given to the three tunnels? Tom, Dick, Harry
  • Who composed the music for the ballets Sleeping Beauty and Swan Lake?Tchaikovsky.
  • A palmiped's feet are more commonly called what? Webbed
  • Can Queen Elizabeth the Second vote? no
  • What Great Lake state has more shoreline than the entire U.S. Atlantic seaboard? Michigan.
  • What is Canada's national animal? Beaver
  • What were the names of the two mythological children who were raised by a wolf in Italy? Romulus and Remus.
  • What was Che Guevara's nationality? Argentinian.
  • In which year did Britain start using the decimal currency? 1971.
  • What is the average temperature of the human body, in degrees centigrade?37.
  • What does the Latin phrase 'caveat emptor' mean? Let the buyer beware.
  • In which county is the UK prime minister's official country residence Chequers? Buckinghamshire
  • Who wrote the novel David Copperfield? Charles Dickens.
  • How long is the compulsory military service in England? it doesn't exist
  • What duo survived a 1909 shootout with Bolivia’s cavalry, according to historians? Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.
  • How many American cents make up a dime? 10.
  • What film star who was in 9« weeks is now a boxer? Mickey Rourke
  • What magazine boasts the slogan: “Test, Inform, Protect”? Consumer Reports.
  • In what language does "obrigado" mean "thank you"? Portuguese
  • Whose statue in Red Square was pulled down in 1991? Lenin's.
  • Name the four main human blood groups. A, B, AB and O.
  • What did blind bank robber David Worrell use as a weapon when trying to rob a London bank? His cane.
  • In the song, Heartbreak Hotel is on which street? Lonely Street
  • The Sheffield Shield is competed for in which sport? Cricket (australia)
  • How many prongs are there on a fork? 4
  • Which field of artistry did Louis Daguerre develop? Photography.
  • What explorer introduced pigs to North America? Christopher Columbus.
  • What is the bluebird of symbol of? Happiness.
  • Which British coin was also known as a bob? Shilling.
  • What do the British call the vegetables that Americans call zucchini? Courgettes
  • What did Joseph Priesley discover in 1774? Oxygen
  • What is the alternative common name for a Black Leopard? Panther
  • Alan Minter was undisputed World boxing champion at which weight? Middleweight
  • Name the gold coin introduced by Henry VII. Sovereign.
  • What nationality of soldiers wear a white kilt? Greek.
  • At which battle of 1314 did Robert The Bruce defeat the English forces? Bannockburn
  • How many children has Queen Elizabeth the Second got? 4
  • Which illness wiped out thousands of people across Europe during the 14th Century? Bubonic Plague.
  • What is the name given to a locked case in which decanters can be seen but not used? Tantalus
  • How many months have 31 days? 7
  • How many people went onto Noah's Ark? 8
  • What are espadrilles? Sandals.
  • What sort of animals feature in the children's book, Watership Down? Rabbits.
  • How many pockets does a snooker table have? 6.
  • What is converted into alcohol during brewing? Sugar
  • How many squares are there on a chess board? 64.
  • What do you call a time span of one thousand years? Millennium.
  • What language has the most words? English
  • Name the type of footwear invented in 1815, which enables the wearer to move very quickly over smooth, flat ground. Roller skates.
  • Which English village, found near Rochester in Kent, gave its name to correctional facilities for young adults? Borstal.
  • Which fictional character lived at 221b Baker Street? Sherlock Holmes.
  • Name the Suffragette who threw herself under King George V's horse in 1913?Emily Davison.
  • How many sets of petals does a Tudor rose have? 5.
  • What country gave Florida to the USA in 1891? Spain
  • In knitting, what is meant by the initials 'psso'? Pass Slipped Stitch Over
  • What did the Montgolfier brothers invent? the balloon
  • What continent has the fewest flowering plants? Antarctica.
  • For which fruit is the US state of Georgia famous? Peach
  • Name the world’s biggest island. Greenland.
  • In what decade was the last execution at the Tower of London? 1940's
  • Vodka, Galliano and orange juice are used to make which classic cocktail? Harvey Wallbanger
  • Who was known as the Welsh Wizard? David Lloyd George.
  • May Queen, Wisley Crab, Foxwhelps and Lane’s Prince Albert are all species of what? Apples.
  • What is the capital city of Spain? Madrid.
  • What do you call the smell which wine gives off? Bouquet.
  • Which historical event is remembered in the nursery rhyme, Ring-a-ring O' Roses? The Great Plague of 1665.
  • What is the only English language single word anagram of the word crouton? Contour
  • Name the two main actors in "The Sting". Paul Newman and Robert Redford
  • How have vegetables been cut which are served Julienne? Thin Strips (or Shreds Or Sliced Lengthways)
  • Which species of mollusc and a planet share a common name? Venus.
  • What is sushi traditionally wrapped in? Edible seaweed.
  • What Elton John album became the first album to enter the charts at Number One, in 1975? Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy.
  • What is the capital of Australia? Canberra
  • What ingredient in fresh milk is eventually devoured by bacteria, causing the sour taste? Lactose.
  • KAR120C was the registration of a yellow Lotus 7, in which 1960s cult UK TV series? The Prisoner
  • What is the third major Balearic Island with Majorca and Minorca? Ibiza
  • What liqueur bearing the letters D.O.M. on the bottle label was developed at Fecamp, France, in the 16th century? Benedictine (dom = Deo Optimo Maximo = To God, Most Good, Most Great.)
  • What is a bouquet garni? Bunch of herbs used to add flavour to food.
  • What is the word used to describe an animal/plant that is both male and female? Hermaphrodite
  • What is infant whale commonly called? Calf
  • Name all four of the Marx Brothers. Groucho, Zeppo, Harpo and Chico.
  • What sort of creature did St George allegedly slay? Dragon.
  • UNHCR is the United Nation's High Commission for what? Refugees
  • What was the name of the Bronte sister's brother? Branwell.
  • What is the national game of the Basques? Pelota (a Form Of Tennis Using Racket Or Hand With A Net Or Against A Wall)
  • Name the dog in a traditional the Punch and Judy show. Toby.
  • Which black mineral, especially popular with Victorians, was used to make jewellery? Jet.
  • TV commercials for Campari launched the career of which actress? Lorraine Chase
  • When did the world celebrate its most recent millennium? Year 2000.
  • How many points does a compass have? 32.
  • How many dots are there on two dice? 42
  • How many players are there in a basketball team? 5
  • What colour is the brandy liquor called Chartreuse? Green or yellow.
  • Who was the very first female Member of Parliament in Britain? Nancy Astor.
  • What is kaolin also known as? China clay.
  • What do the opposite sides of a dice add up to? 7
  • Phyllis Nan Sortain Pechey was as famous for her flamboyant character as for her cookery books and TV show throughout the late 1960s to the mid 1970s. By what name was she more usually known? Fanny Cradock.
  • What make of car was the time-machine in the film Back To The Future? De Lorean
  • Name the two families in Romeo and Juliet? Montague & Capulet
  • What nationality was Chopin? Polish
  • Who wrote a series of novels about orcs, hobbits, goblins and elves? JR Tolkien.
  • How many lanes does an olympic swimming pool have? 8
  • The llama belongs to the family of animals commonly called what? Camels
  • What do you use to take a cork out of a bottle? a corkscrew
  • Which former American President had a popular children's toy named after him? Theodore Roosevelt.
  • How many strings does a cello have? 4.
  • How much does a litre of water weigh? 1kg
  • What does the female praying mantis do after she's made love? eats the male
  • What nation’s military attached dynamite packs to Dobermans before sending them into Palestinian guerrilla hideouts? Israel.
  • What are the five colours of the Olympic rings? r,y,g,blue black
  • What is the colour of the bull of an archery target? Gold
  • What religion was Adolf Hitler? Catholic
  • Which annual English festival of music was founded by the conductor Sir Henry Joseph Wood in 1895? Promenade Concerts.
  • What is 15 metres high, 8 metres wide and 240 kilometers long? Wall
  • In which bay is Alcatraz? San Francisco Bay
  • Chaucer wrote The Canterbury Tales - what was his first name? Geoffrey.
  • What element begins with the letter “K”? Krypton.
  • How many sides does a dodecagon have? 12.
  • Which two numbers are used in binary? 0 and 1.
  • How many legs has a spider got? 8
  • Who became the first female President and Head of State in Latin America?Maria Estela Isabel Peron.
  • How many U.S. states border the Gulf of Mexico? Five.
  • What is allspice alternatively known as? Pimento.
  • Consecrated in 1962, where is the Cathedral Church of St Michael? Coventry
  • Name the historical prince whose name was used by Bram Stoker in his famous novel. Dracula.
  • In Japanese, what is the word for goodbye? Sayonara.
  • On TV, who did the character Lurch work for? Addams Family
  • What colours make purple? red and blue
  • Who was known as The Tramp or The King of Comedy? Charlie Chaplin.
  • What laundry detergent got lots of mileage out of the ad line, “ring around the collar”? Wisk.
  • What life-saving device did Sir Humphry Davy invent? Miner's safety lamp, the Davy Lamp.
  • What activity other than jumping are kangaroos good at? boxing
  • In which Dickens novel was Miss Havisham jilted on her wedding day? Great Expectations
  • The feeling of having already experienced something which is now happening again is known as what? Deja vu.
  • How long is a round in boxing? 3 minutes
  • Also the title of a famous literary work, who were Mrs Page and Mrs Ford? Merry Wives Of Windsor
  • How many gallons of beer are in a firkin? Nine
  • In UK TV's 'Noel Edmund's House Party', the 'house' was situated near to which village? Crinkley Bottom
  • What model appeared topless on the self-penned 1993 novel Pirate? Fabio.
  • What is the diameter of Earth? 8,000 miles.
  • What does a numismatist study or collect? Coins (and/or Medals)
  • What national holiday in Mexico has picnickers munching chocolate coffins and sugar skulls? The Day of the Dead.
  • The word 'bible' comes from the Greek 'biblion' - what does biblion mean? Book.
  • What is the other name for Wildebeest? Gnu
  • If you had Lafite-Rothschild on your dinner table, what would it be? Wine.
  • Name two actors who played James Bond. Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan
  • What do you call the pudding made from ice-cream on sponge, which is covered by meringue? Baked Alaska.
  • How many arms/tentacles/limbs does a squid have? Ten (there Are Varying Definitions Of Tentacles/arms For Squids - Generally A Squid Is Considered To Have Two Tentacles And Eight Arms - Whatever, There Are Ten Of Them In Total)
  • How many players are there in a volleyball team? 6
  • Alastair Burnett, Sandy Gall, Reginald Bosanquet, Alastair Stewart, Carol Barnes and Trevor McDonald were all regular presenters of which TV programme? ITV News at Ten.
  • Who wrote The Grapes of Wrath? John Steinbeck.
  • Robin Hood & Friar Tuck appear in which well-known novel, by Sir Walter Scott? Ivanhoe
  • How many oscars did Alfred Hitchcock win? none
  • What horoscope sign has a crab? cancer
  • What is the policeman's name in Noddy stories? Pc Plod
  • What colour is Absynth? Green.
  • How many wives did Henry the Eighth have? six
  • How old is a horse when it changes from a filly to a mare? Four Years
  • What are the first three words of the bible? In the beginning
  • For his part in which 1953 film did Frank Sinatra receive a Best Supporting Actor Oscar? From Here To Eternity
  • What did the crocodile swallow in Peter Pan? alarm clock
  • What was a Puffing Billy? Steam train.
  • What are tarot cards usually used for? Fortune telling.
  • What is an otter's home called? Holt
  • Who was the legendary king who was killed at the Battle of Camelford? Arthur.
  • In literature, who was the best known pupil of Greyfriar's School? Billy Bunter
  • In which country did the Mau Mau uprising (1952-60) occur? Kenya
  • Which branch of mathematics deals with the sides and angles of triangles, and their relationship to each other? Trigonometry.
  • Which traditional Scottish musical instrument was once banned under English law? Bag pipes.
  • What money do they use in Japan? yen
  • How many events are there in the decathlon? 10
  • Characters Charlie Allnut and Rosie Sayer appeared in which classic 1951 movie? The African Queen (humphrey Bogart & Katherine Hepburn)
  • What is the minimum number of musicians a band must have to be considered a “big band”? Ten.
  • What is an antonym? A word which is the opposite of another word.
  • Which delicacy is loved by pigs, who dig for it around tree roots? Truffles.
  • In which film did Roger Moore first play James Bond? Live And Let Die (1973)
  • How many colours are there in a rainbow? 7
  • What is the most northerly cricket ground at which a Test Match can (as at 2009) be played? Riverside (chester-le-street, Durham)
  • 'Mace is one of the spices obtained from the tree Myristica Fragrams - what is the other? Nutmeg
  • Who invented Kodak cameras? George Eastman.
  • What nationality was Marco Polo? Italian
  • If cats are feline, what are sheep? Ovine
  • What is the Scottish drink made from whisky and heather honey called?Drambuie.
  • How many lines should a limerick have? 5.
  • What is a large marquee called when used to house a circus? Big Top.
  • Name a famous detective who smoked a pipe and played the violin. S. Holmes
  • How many fingers did Ann Boleyn have? 11
  • In what year was Prince Andrew born? 1960 (19th February)
  • What country saw a world record 315 million voters turn out for elections on May 20, 1991? India.
  • What did Sir Christopher Cockerell invent? Hovercraft.
  • Who was the author of the once-popular Father Brown detective novels? GK Chesterton.
  • What is the name of red earthenware pottery, which remains porous when unglazed? Terracotta.
  • How many eyes are there on a pack of 52 cards? 42
  • What F-word is defined in physics as a “nuclear reaction in which nuclei combine to form more massive nuclei”? Fusion.
  • Complete the name of the American Football team: 'Washington ...........'? Redskins
  • In Roman mythology, Neptune is the equivalent to which Greek god? Poseidon
  • How many symphonies did Beethoven compose? 9.
  • What is the world’s longest river? Amazon.
  • What was the very first women's magazine called? The Ladies Mercury.
  • What colour is a panda? black and white
  • According to Greek mythology, who stole fire for mankind's benefit?Prometheus.
  • What was John Wayne's original name? Marion Morrison.
  • In which State would you find the city of Birmingham? Alabama (or Michigan, Which Has A Smaller City Of That Name)
  • In British mythology, who were Gog and Magog? Giants.
  • At which town did Billy Butlin open his first holiday camp? Skegness (1936)
  • In which English abbey would you find Poets' Corner? Westminster.
  • What railway linked Moscow and Irkutsk in 1900? The Trans-Siberian Railway.
  • What was Mozart's full baptismal name? Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart.
  • Who is Norma Jean Baker more usually known as? Marilyn Monroe.
  • Name the Celtic language spoken in Brittany. Breton.
  • In which year did Foinavon win the Grand National? 1967
  • The Dewey Decimal system is used to categorise what? Books.
  • How many degrees are found in a circle? 360.
  • Name three of the beatles Ringo Starr, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison
  • In which city was Martin Luther King assassinated in 1968? Memphis, Tennessee
  • What are the three primary colours? red, blue and yellow