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Scottish Names

For your baby, but Scotland has given us plenty of brave, creative, and inventive names to choose from. Check out these Scottish baby names


 

Here are some Scottish names that we went over when we were naming our cute little baby. We had a hard time but were happy when we found the perfect Scottish name. Boys and girls Scottish names are below:

  • Dabhaidh: scottish gaelic form of hebrew david, meaning "beloved."
  • Magnus: scandinavian name derived from the latter part of french charlemagne ("charles the great"), from latin magnus, meaning "great." used infrequently by the irish and scottish. Compare with another form of magnus.
  • Cam: short form of scottish unisex cameron ("crooked nose"), and other names beginning with cam-.
  • Eallair: scottish contracted form of gaelic ceallair, meaning "superior of a church cell."

  • Sìleas: scottish gaelic form of latin cæcilia, meaning "blind."
  • Cliamain: scottish gaelic form of latin clementius, meaning "gentle and merciful."
  • Ellar: modern form of scottish eallair, meaning "superior of a church cell."
  • Eamhair: scottish form of gaelic éimhear, possibly meaning "ready, swift." 
  • Crìsdean: scottish name derived from crìosd, meaning "christ." used as a form of english christopher, meaning "christ-bearer."
  • Eudard: dialectal variant of scottish gaelic eideard, meaning "guardian of prosperity."
  • Màiri: scottish form of greek maria, meaning "obstinacy, rebelliousness" or "their rebellion."
  • Kirsty: pet form of scottish kirstine, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."
  • Aithbhreac: old scottish gaelic name meaning "new speckled one."
  • Ishbel: scottish form of latin isabella, meaning "god is my oath." 
  • Devorgilla: variant spelling of scottish diorbhail, meaning "true testimony."
  • Irving: scottish surname transferred to english forename use, composed of the welsh elements ir/yr "fresh, green" and afon "water," hence "fresh water" or "green water."
  • Lochlainn: variant spelling of scottish gaelic lochlann, meaning "lake-land."

  • Fife: scottish surname transferred to forename use, meaning "from fife," a place said to have gotten its name from the legendary pictish hero fib.
  • Muireall: scottish gaelic form of irish gaelic muirgheal, meaning "sea-bright."
  • Iona: scottish name derived from the name of an island in the hebrides, ultimately from old norse ey, meaning "island." compare with another form of iona.
  • Ainslie: variant spelling of scottish unisex ainsley, meaning "hermitage meadow." 
  • Kylee: feminine form of scottish unisex kyle, meaning "slender." compare with another form of kylee.
  • Maxwell: scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from the place name maxwell, meaning "the stream of mack." 
  • Lauchlan: variant spelling of scottish gaelic lachlan, meaning "lake-land."
  • Eòghan: scottish form of irish gaelic eóghan, meaning "born of yew."
  • Ruairi: scottish equivalent of irish ruairí, meaning "red king."
  • Alaister: variant spelling of scottish gaelic alastair, meaning "defender of mankind."
  • Suibhne: irish and scottish gaelic name meaning "well-going." 
  • Frang: scottish gaelic form of latin franciscus, meaning "french."
  • Mìcheal: scottish gaelic form of greek micha?L, meaning "who is like god?"
  • Fenella: scottish anglicized form of irish gaelic fionnghuala, meaning "white shoulder." 

  • Kirsteen: variant spelling of scottish kirstin, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."
  • Teasag: pet form of scottish gaelic seonag, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Pàl: scottish form of latin paulus, meaning "small."
  • Donnag: feminine form of scottish gaelic domhnall, meaning "world ruler."
  • Graham: scottish name derived from the surname grantham, from a place name composed of the old english elements grand "gravel" and ham"home," hence "gravel home."
  • Ceanntighern: scottish gaelic name composed of the elements ceann "head" and tigern "lord," hence "head lord."
  • Annabelle: scottish variant form of english amabel, meaning "lovable." compare with another form of annabelle.
  • Murron: scottish form of irish gaelic muireann, meaning "sea-fair."
  • Callum: variant spelling of scottish calum, meaning "dove."
  • Normanna: scottish form of english norma, meaning "northman."
  • Ewart: scottish surname transferred to forename use, possibly originally an anglo-norman form of english edward, meaning "guardian of prosperity."
  • Greer: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, derived from a contracted form of gregor, meaning "watchful; vigilant."
  • Greig: pet form of scottish gregor, meaning "watchful; vigilant."
  • Gavina: scottish feminine form of celtic gavin, meaning either "may hawk" or "white hawk."
  • Dolaidh: pet form of scottish gaelic domhnall, meaning "world ruler." 
  • Rona: variant spelling of english/scottish rhona, meaning "wise ruler."
  • Dàniel: scottish gaelic form of hebrew daniyel, meaning "god is my judge."
  • Clyde: english name derived from the name of the scottish river cledwyn, of uncertain origin, but probably having a similar etymology to irishclodagh, meaning "muddy."
  • Dermid: variant spelling of scottish gaelic diarmad, meaning "without envy."
  • Sìle: scottish gaelic form of latin cæcilia, meaning "blind." 
  • Arabel: scottish form of english amabel, meaning "lovable."
  • Gormlaith: old irish and scottish gaelic name composed of the elements gorm "illustrious, splendid" and flaith "lady, princess," hence "illustrious princess" or "splendid lady."
  • Hamilton: scottish surname transferred to english forename use, composed of the old english elements hamel "blunt, crooked, flat-topped" and dun"hill," hence "flat-topped hill."
  • Tàmhas: scottish gaelic form of greek th?Mas, meaning "twin."
  • Sìoltach: scottish gaelic name derived from a byname meaning "sowing," i.E., "fruitful, seed-bearing, producing many offspring."

  • Alyth: from the scottish place name alyth, from gaelic aileadh, meaning "ascending, rising."
  • Lockie: pet form of scottish lùcas, meaning "from lucania." 
  • Alasteir: variant spelling of scottish gaelic alastair, meaning "defender of mankind."
  • Ìmhear: scottish gaelic form of old norse ívarr, meaning "bow warrior."
  • Wiley: variant spelling of irish/scottish wylie, meaning "will-helmet." compare with another form of wiley.
  • Somerled: scottish gaelic form of old norse sumarlíðr, meaning "summer traveler."
  • Liùsaidh: scottish form of roman latin lucia, meaning "light."
  • Rabbie: pet form of scottish raibeart, meaning "bright fame."
  • Deòiridh: scottish gaelic name meaning "pilgrim."
  • Gordon: scottish surname transferred to forename use, from the name of a place in berwickshire composed of the welsh elements gor "spacious" anddin "fort," hence "spacious fort." 
  • Adaire: scottish surname derived from the irish place name athdare, composed of the elements ath "a ford" and dare (from darach), hence "the ford of the oaks." click here to read a tradition concerning the origin of the sur name.
  • Glenna: feminine form of scottish glen, meaning "valley."
  • Cináed: scottish gaelic name, meaning "born of fire." kenneth is an anglicized form. 
  • Murdann: feminine form of scottish murdoch, meaning "sea warrior."
  • Muireach: modern contracted form of scottish gaelic muiredach, meaning "sea warrior."

  • Màrtainn: scottish gaelic form of latin martinus, meaning "of/like mars."
  • Arabela: variant spelling of scottish arabella, meaning "lovable."
  • Kyle: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the name of various places derived from the gaelic element caol "narrow," hence "slender." compare with strictly feminine kyle.
  • Gregg: short form of english gregory, and scottish gregor, meaning "watchful; vigilant."
  • Pòl: scottish form of greek paulos, meaning "small."
  • Tòmachan: pet form of scottish gaelic tòmas, meaning "twin."
  • Alestair: variant spelling of scottish gaelic alastair, meaning "defender of mankind."
  • Forbes: scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from the gaelic word forba, meaning "district, field." 
  • Ainsley: scottish habitational surname transferred to unisex forename use, composed of the old english elements ansetl "hermitage" and leah"meadow, pasture," hence "hermitage meadow."
  • Lachina: feminine form of scottish lachlan, meaning "lake-land."
  • Ally: scottish pet form of norman french alison, meaning "noble sort."
  • Ciorsdan: pet form of scottish gaelic cairistìona, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."
  • Pàdraig: scottish gaelic form of irish gaelic pádraig, meaning "patrician; of noble descent."
  • Sawney: pet form of scottish gaelic alaisdair, meaning "defender of mankind."
  • Jessie: pet form of scottish jean, meaning "god is gracious." compare with other forms of jessie.
  • Alastair: scottish gaelic form of latin alexandrus, meaning "defender of mankind."
  • Mairead: scottish form of greek margarites, meaning "pearl."
  • Amhlaibh: scottish gaelic form of scandinavian anlaf (o.N. Ánleifr), meaning "heir of the ancestors."
  • Cairistìona: scottish gaelic form of latin christiana, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."
  • Jockie: pet form of scottish jock, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Ronalda: feminine form of english/scottish ronald, meaning "wise ruler."
  • Sìneag: scottish gaelic form of french jeanette, meaning "god is gracious." 
  • Ina: english and scottish short form of longer names ending with -ina, such as christina and dolina. Compare with another form of ina.
  • Ranulf: scottish form of old norse randulfr, meaning "shield-wolf." compare with another form of ranulf.
  • Alickina: scottish form of latin alexandra, meaning "defender of mankind."
  • Muir: short form of scottish gaelic muireach ("sea warrior"), and other names beginning with muir-, from muir, meaning "sea." 
  • Duff: scottish name derived from the gaelic byname dùbh, meaning "black, dark." compare with another form of duff.
  • Lamont: scottish surname transferred to english forename use, from the medieval swedish personal name lagman, meaning "lawman."

  • Drummond: scottish habitational surname transferred to forename use, derived from gaelic druim, meaning "ridge."
  • Maoilios: scottish gaelic name meaning "servant of jesus." 
  • Kyleigh: feminine form of scottish unisex kyle, meaning "slender." compare with another form of kyleigh.
  • Greg: short form of english gregory, and scottish gregor, both meaning "watchful; vigilant."
  • Jamie: english and scottish pet form of james, meaning "supplanter." compare with feminine jamie.
  • Aodhagán: irish double diminutive form of irish/scottish gaelic aodh, meaning "tiny little fire." 
  • Mackenzie: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from an anglicized form of gaelic mac coinnich "son of coinneach," hence "comely; finely made."
  • Lorraine: french surname transferred to forename use, from the name of a french province, lorraine, from latin lotharingia, meaning "land of the people of lothar." in use by the english and scottish.
  • Eubh: short form of scottish gaelic eubha, meaning "life."
  • Ealasaid: scottish gaelic form of greek elisabet, meaning "god is my oath."
  • Aileen: scottish anglicized form of gaelic aibhilín, meaning "little eve." 
  • Jeanie: pet form of scottish jean, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Wilkie: pet form of scottish gaelic uilleam, meaning "will-helmet." 
  • Ìomhair: variant spelling of scottish gaelic ìomhar, meaning "bow warrior."
  • Athol: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, derived from the name of a district of perthshire, scotland, composed of the gaelic elements ath "ford" and al "rock, stone," hence "ford of the rock; rock-ford." 
  • Stu: english and scottish short form of french stuart, meaning "house guard; steward."
  • Griogair: scottish gaelic form of latin gregorius, meaning "watchful; vigilant."
  • Kyla: feminine form of scottish unisex kyle, meaning "slender." compare with another form of kyla.
  • Cait: short form of irish caitríona and scottish caitrìona, meaning "pure."
  • Steafan: scottish gaelic form of french stéphane, meaning "crown."
  • Blair: scottish unisex name derived from any of a number of places in scotland called blair, derived from the gaelic word blàr, meaning "field, plain," most often referring to a "battlefield." 
  • Grizel: scottish form of german griselda, meaning "grey battle maid."
  • Sinclair: scottish surname transferred to forename use, from a norman baronial place name in france called "saint-clair."
  • Alaistair: variant spelling of scottish gaelic alastair, meaning "defender of mankind."
  • Murdina: feminine form of scottish murdoch, meaning "sea warrior."
  • Leslie: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the place name lesslyn in aberdeenshire which got its name from gaelic leas cuilinn, meaning "garden of hollies."
  • Tam: short form of scottish gaelic tàmhas, meaning "twin." compare with another form of tam.
  • Mysie: pet form of scottish mairead, meaning "pearl."
  • Willie: pet form of scottish gaelic uilleam, meaning "will-helmet." compare with another form of willie.
  • Tocuil: scottish form of old norse þorketill, meaning "thor's cauldron."
  • Slàine: scottish form of irish gaelic sláine, meaning "health."
  • Blair: scottish unisex name derived from any of a number of places in scotland called blair, derived from the gaelic word blàr, meaning "field, plain," most often referring to a "battlefield." 
  • Ainslie: variant spelling of scottish unisex ainsley, meaning "hermitage meadow." 
  • Ìomhar: scottish gaelic form of old norse ívarr, meaning "bow warrior."
  • Columb: scottish form of latin columba, meaning "dove."
  • Iòseph: scottish gaelic form of greek ioseph (latin josephus), meaning "(god) shall add (another son)." 
  • Anstace: variant spelling of english/scottish anstice, meaning "resurrection."
  • Pàrlan: scottish gaelic form of irish gaelic parthalán, possibly meaning "son of talmai."
  • Huchon: medieval scottish form of french hugon, meaning "heart," "mind," or "spirit."
  • Lyall: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the old norse personal name liulfr, meaning "shield wolf."
  • Kirstie: pet form of scottish kirstin, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."

  • Dugald: variant form of scottish dùghall, meaning "black stranger."
  • Isla: feminine form of scottish islay, meaning "island."
  • Lennox: scottish surname transferred to forename use, meaning "place of elms." 
  • Frangan: pet form of scottish gaelic frang, meaning "french."
  • Aodh (pronounced ee): modern irish and scottish gaelic form of old gaelic áed, meaning "fire." in celtic mythology, this is the name of a sun god. 
  • Ruairidh: scottish equivalent of irish gaelic ruaidhrí, meaning "red king."
  • Ùna: scottish gaelic form of irish gaelic úna, probably meaning "famine, hunger." 
  • Ramsey: variant spelling of scottish ramsay, meaning "wild-garlic island."
  • Lillias: variant spelling of scottish lilias, meaning "lily."
  • Allie: scottish pet form of norman french alison, meaning "noble sort."
  • Errol: scottish surname transferred to forename use, from a place name possibly meaning "to wander." 
  • Murchadh: scottish gaelic name composed of the elements muir "sea" and cath "battle," hence "sea warrior."
  • Erskine: scottish surname (originally spelled eriskine) transferred to forename use, derived from eriskyne, a contracted form of the old gaelic phraseair an sgian, meaning "upon the knife." 
  • Eubha: scottish gaelic form of greek eva, meaning "life."
  • Dolag: pet form of scottish gaelic donnag, meaning "world ruler."
  • Tòmag: pet form of scottish gaelic tòmas, meaning "twin."
  • Cameron: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the name of the great highland clans whose ancestor had an ungraceful proboscis, composed of the gaelic elements cam "bent, crooked" and sròn "nose," hence "crooked nose."
  • Nicol: scottish form of latin nicolaus, meaning "victor of the people."
  • Ualan: variant spelling of scottish gaelic valan, meaning "healthy, strong."
  • Alec: short form of scottish gaelic alestair, meaning "defender of mankind." compare with other forms of alec.
  • Lachie: pet form of scottish gaelic lachlann, meaning "lake-land."
  • Beitris: scottish form of latin viatrix, meaning "voyager (through life)."
  • Beileag: pet form of scottish iseabail, meaning "god is my oath."
  • Bhaltair: scottish gaelic form of old high german walthere, meaning "ruler of the army." 
  • Óengus: scottish form of gaelic aonghus, meaning "excellent valor."
  • Innis: scottish unisex name derived from gaelic inis, meaning "island."
  • Summerlad: variant spelling of scottish somerled, meaning "summer traveler."
  • Hew: scottish form of old french hugues, meaning "heart," "mind," or "spirit." 
  • Sachairi: scottish form of greek zacharias, meaning "whom jehovah remembered."
  • Uailean: variant spelling of scottish gaelic vailean, meaning "healthy, strong."
  • Lùcas: scottish gaelic form of latin lucas, meaning "from lucania." 
  • Glenn: variant spelling of scottish glen, meaning "valley."
  • Goraidh: scottish gaelic form of english godfrey, meaning "god's peace."
  • Uilleam: scottish gaelic form of german wilhelm, meaning "will-helmet."
  • Dand: pet form of scottish aindrea, meaning "man; warrior."
  • Seòras: scottish form of greek georgios, meaning "earth-worker, farmer."
  • Jocky: variant spelling of scottish jockie, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Heckie: scottish pet form of latin hector, meaning "defend; hold fast."
  • Thorburn: scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from old norse þorbiorn, meaning "thor's bear."

  • Mór: irish and scottish gaelic name meaning "great."
  • Diorbhail: variant spelling of scottish diorbhorguil, meaning "true testimony." used as a scottish anglicized form of dorothy ("gift of god").
  • Elspie: pet form of of scottish elspeth, meaning "god is my oath."
  • Boyd: scottish surname transferred to forename use, meaning "yellow," as in yellow-haired.
  • Maighread: scottish form of english margaret, meaning "pearl."
  • Lachlan: variant spelling of scottish gaelic lachlann, meaning "lake-land." 
  • Leslie: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the place name lesslyn in aberdeenshire which got its name from gaelic leas cuilinn, meaning "garden of hollies."
  • Ronnie: pet form of english/scottish ronald, meaning "wise ruler." compare with feminine ronnie.
  • Jamesena: variant spelling of scottish jamesina, meaning "supplanter."
  • Neilina: pet form of english neile, meaning "champion." in use by the scottish.
  • Gilchrist: scottish gaelic name derived from the phrase giolla chríost, meaning "servant of christ."
  • Sìne: scottish gaelic form of french jeanne, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Anstey: pet form of english/scottish anstice, meaning "resurrection."
  • Irvine: scottish surname transferred to english forename use, from the celtic name of a river, composed of the welsh elements ir/yr "fresh, green" and afon "water," hence "fresh water" or "green water."
  • Sheumais: older form of scottish gaelic seumas, meaning "supplanter."
  • Mhairi: variant spelling of scottish màiri, meaning "obstinacy, rebelliousness" or "their rebellion." 
  • Steenie: pet form of scottish steaphan, meaning "crown."
  • Brenda: old irish and scottish name believed to be of scandinavian origin, from old norse brandr, meaning "sword." 
  • Davie: pet form of scottish gaelic dàibhidh, meaning "beloved." compare with another form of davie.
  • Seonag: scottish gaelic form of english joan, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Finella: scottish anglicized form of irish gaelic fionnghuala, meaning "white shoulder."
  • Dearbhorghil: variant spelling of scottish dearbhfhorghaill, meaning "true testimony."
  • Logan: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the name of a place in ayrshire, meaning "hollow, lowland." 
  • Iain: variant spelling of scottish gaelic ian, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Edmé: scottish feminine form of french unisex esmé, meaning "esteemed, loved."
  • Kylie: feminine form of scottish unisex kyle, meaning "slender." compare with another form of kylie.
  • Islay: scottish name derived from the name of the island known as the "queen of the hebrides," meaning "island" in gaelic.
  • Domhnall: scottish gaelic name composed of the celtic elements dubno "world" and val "rule," hence "world ruler."
  • Eithrig: variant form of scottish gaelic oighrig, possibly meaning "new speckled one."
  • Rodina: scottish feminine form of english rodney, meaning "hroda's fen/island."

  • Donaidh: pet form of scottish gaelic domhnall, meaning "world ruler." equivalent to english donnie.
  • Oighrig: possibly a modern variant spelling of scottish gaelic aithbhreac, meaning "new speckled one."
  • Henderson: scottish surname transferred to forename use, meaning "son of hendry."
  • Curstaidh: pet form of scottish gaelic cairistìona, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."
  • Morag: scottish pet form of irish/scottish mór, meaning "great." compare with another form of morag.
  • Jeannie: variant spelling of scottish jeanie, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Pàislig: scottish gaelic name, possibly derived from late latin basilica, meaning "church."
  • Munga: older form of scottish mungo, possibly meaning "dearest friend."
  • Bearnas: scottish gaelic form of latin berenice, meaning "bringer of victory."
  • Sorcha: gaelic name meaning "radiant." in use by the irish and scottish.
  • Lachlann: variant spelling of scottish gaelic lochlann, meaning "lake-land."
  • Tadhg: irish and scottish gaelic name meaning "poet."
  • Annis: scottish form of french agnès, meaning "chaste; holy." compare with another form of annis.
  • Ranulph: variant spelling of scottish ranulf, meaning "shield-wolf."
  • Doileag: feminine form of scottish gaelic domhnall, meaning "world ruler."
  • Seumas: scottish gaelic form of latin jacomus, meaning "supplanter."
  • Muicheachtach: scottish gaelic name composed of the elements muir "sea" and ceartach "ruler, skilled," hence "skilled seaman." 
  • Campbell: scottish surname transferred to forename use, composed of the gaelic elements cam "bent, crooked" and beul "mouth," hence "crooked mouth."
  • Lyle: scottish surname transferred to forename use, from the norman french phrase de l'isle, meaning "from the island."
  • Fyfe: variant spelling of scottish fife, meaning "from fife."
  • Dàibhidh: scottish gaelic form of hebrew david, meaning "beloved."
  • Lyall: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the old norse personal name liulfr, possibly meaning "shield wolf."
  • Iseabail: scottish form of latin isabella, meaning "god is my oath."
  • Raibeart: scottish gaelic form of norman french robert, meaning "bright fame."
  • Labhrainn: scottish gaelic form of latin laurentius, meaning "of laurentum."
  • Ilka: scottish name meaning "of the same class." compare with another form of ilka.
  • Rab: pet form of scottish raibeart, meaning "bright fame." compare with another form of rab.
  • Elspeth: scottish gaelic form of greek elisabet, meaning "god is my oath."
  • Fraser: french surname transferred to forename use, of norman origin, but the derivation has been lost due to corruption of form by association with the french word fraise, meaning "strawberry." in english and scottish use.
  • Grahame: variant spelling of scottish graham, meaning "gravel home."
  • Kester: medieval scottish form of latin crescentius, meaning "to spring up, grow, thrive."
  • Dearbhfhorghaill: variant spelling of scottish diorbhorguil, meaning "true testimony."
  • Kit: pet form of medieval scottish kester, meaning "christ-bearer." compare with another form of kit.
  • Peigi: pet form of scottish maighread, meaning "pearl."
  • Osgar: scottish name composed of the gaelic elements os "deer" and cara "lover," hence "deer-lover." compare with another form of osgar.
  • Valan: scottish gaelic form of latin valentinus, meaning "healthy, strong."
  • Paaie: manx form of scottish peigi, meaning "pearl."
  • Raghnaid: scottish gaelic form of scandinavian ragnhild, meaning "battle counsel."
  • Kenzie: short form of scottish unisex mackenzie, meaning "comely, finely made."
  • Beathan: scottish name derived from gaelic beatha, meaning "life."
  • Vailean: scottish gaelic form of latin valentinus, meaning "healthy, strong."
  • Kirstin: variant spelling of scottish kirstine, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."
  • Beathag: feminine form of scottish beathan, meaning "life."
  • Aindrea: scottish gaelic form of greek andreas, meaning "man; warrior."
  • Maighdlin: scottish name meaning "magnificent."
  • Fib: scottish (pictish) name meaning "poet." in legend, this is the name of a pictish hero after whom the kingdom of fib (later known as fife) was named.
  • Jean: scottish form of french jeanne, meaning "god is gracious." compare with masculine jean.
  • Lenox: variant spelling of scottish lennox, meaning "place of elms." 
  • Lochlann: scottish gaelic name, originally used to refer to someone from norway, composed of the elements loch "lake" and lann "land," hence "lake-land."
  • Barabal: scottish form of greek barbara, meaning "foreign; strange."
  • Moray: scottish form of english murray, meaning "sea warrior."
  • Athol: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, derived from the name of a district of perthshire, scotland, composed of the gaelic elements ath "ford" and al "rock, stone," hence "ford of the rock; rock-ford." 
  • Goiridh: scottish gaelic form of old high german godafrid, meaning "god's peace."
  • Tasgall: scottish gaelic form of old norse ásketill, meaning "divine kettle."
  • Saundra: scottish diminutive form of latin alexandra, meaning "defender of mankind."
  • Caitr�ona: scottish gaelic form of french catherine, meaning "pure."
  • Maitland: english and scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from a byname for an ungracious person, from anglo-norman frenchmaltalent/mautalent, meaning "bad tempered." 
  • Melville: scottish surname of norman french origin, transferred to english forename use, from the name of various places in normandy calledmalleville, meaning "bad settlement."
  • Ian: scottish gaelic form of greek ioannes (english john), meaning "god is gracious."
  • Jinny: scottish form of english jenny, meaning "white and smooth."
  • Graeme: variant spelling of scottish graham, meaning "gravel home."
  • Ruaraidh: variant spelling of scottish ruairidh, meaning "red king."
  • Normina: scottish form of english norma, meaning "northman."
  • Alistair: variant spelling of scottish gaelic alastair, meaning "defender of mankind."
  • Seònaid: scottish gaelic form english janet, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Aileas: scottish gaelic form of english alice, meaning "noble sort."
  • Mckenna: irish and scottish surname transferred to forename use, from an anglicized form of gaelic mac cionaodha, meaning "son of cionaodh," hence "born of fire."
  • Paisley: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from an anglicized form of gaelic pàislig, possibly meaning "church."
  • Augusulus: scottish form of roman latin augustus, meaning "venerable." in arthurian legend, this is the name of a king who attended arthur's coronation.
  • Chirsty: variant spelling of scottish kirsty, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."
  • Tòmas: scottish gaelic form of greek th?Mas, meaning "twin."
  • Seòsaidh: scottish gaelic form of greek ioseph, meaning "(god) shall add (another son)." 
  • Raibert: variant spelling of scottish gaelic raibeart, meaning "bright fame."
  • Dollag: variant spelling of scottish gaelic dolag, meaning "world ruler."
  • Innis: scottish unisex name derived from gaelic inis, meaning "island."
  • Muiriartach: modern form of scottish gaelic muicheachtach, meaning "skilled seaman."
  • Sìm: scottish gaelic form of greek symeon, meaning "hearkening."
  • Barclay: scottish form of old english berkeley, meaning "birch tree meadow." 
  • Diarmad: scottish gaelic form of irish gaelic diarmaid, meaning "without envy."
  • Annag: scottish gaelic form of latin anna, meaning "favor; grace." 
  • Balfour: scottish surname transferred to forename use, composed of the gaelic elements bail "farm, house, village," and p�ir "grass, pasture," hence "farm pasture; grazing land."
  • Fionnaghal: variant spelling of scottish gaelic fionnghuala, meaning "white shoulder."
  • Ailbeart: scottish gaelic form of english albert, meaning "bright nobility."
  • Filib: scottish gaelic form of french philippe, meaning "lover of horses."
  • Bryce: scottish form of welsh brychan, meaning "pied, spotted, speckled." 
  • Adaminna: variant spelling of scottish adamina, meaning "earth" or "red."
  • Ruaridh: variant spelling of scottish ruairidh, meaning "red king."
  • Torquil: variant spelling of scottish torcuil, meaning "thor's cauldron."
  • Seoc: scottish gaelic form of french jacques (english jack), meaning "god is gracious."
  • Nandag: pet form of scottish gaelic annag, meaning "favor; grace."
  • Ailbert: variant spelling of scottish gaelic ailbeart, meaning "bright nobility."
  • Logan: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the place name in ayrshire, meaning "hollow, lowland." 
  • Diorbhorguil: older form of scottish diorbhail, meaning "true testimony."
  • Nonie: pet form of scottish iona, meaning "island." compare with another form of nonie.
  • Neacal: scottish gaelic form of greek nikolaos, meaning "victor of the people."
  • Jamieson: english and scottish patronymic surname transferred to forename use, meaning "son of jamie."
  • Erroll: variant spelling of scottish errol, possibly meaning "to wander."
  • Simidh: scottish gaelic form of greek symeon, meaning "hearkening."
  • Keith: scottish surname transferred to forename use, probably derived a celtic word meaning "forest, wood."
  • Cam: short form of scottish unisex cameron ("crooked nose"), and other names beginning with cam-.
  • Comhnall: scottish form of irish gaelic conall, meaning "hound of valor."
  • Nichol: variant spelling of scottish nicol, meaning "victor of the people."
  • Torcuil: scottish gaelic form of old norse þorketill, meaning "thor's cauldron."
  • Cameron: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the name of the great highland clans whose ancestor had an ungraceful proboscis, composed of the gaelic elements cam "bent, crooked" and sròn "nose," hence "crooked nose."
  • Malvina: this name was invented by the scottish poet james macpherson, based on the gaelic term mala mhin, meaning "smooth-brow." 
  • Frangag: feminine form of scottish gaelic frang, meaning "french."
  • Muiríol: scottish gaelic form of irish gaelic muirgheal, meaning "sea-bright." 
  • Isobel: scottish form of latin isabella, meaning "god is my oath." 
  • Arabella: elaborated form of scottish arabel, meaning "lovable." compare with another form of arabella.
  • Foirtchern: irish form of english vortigern, possibly meaning "high lord" or "overlord." in use by the scottish.
  • Leith: scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from the name of a river of celtic origin, meaning "flowing water."
  • Murdag: feminine form of scottish murdoch, meaning "sea warrior."
  • Max: english short form of both latin maximilian "the greatest rival" and scottish maxwell "the stream of mack." 
  • Cormag: scottish form of irish gaelic cormac, meaning "son of defilement."
  • Grant: scottish surname transferred to forename use, from the name of a famous scottish clan, from norman grand, meaning "great, large."
  • Cuddy: pet form of scottish cuithbeart, meaning "bright fame." this name was also used as a byname for a donkey.
  • Bláán: scottish name composed of gaelic blá "yellow" and a diminutive suffix, hence "little yellow one."
  • Lileas: variant spelling of scottish lilias, meaning "lily."
  • Eideard: scottish gaelic form of english edward, meaning "guardian of prosperity."
  • Jaimie: variant spelling of english/scottish jamie, meaning "supplanter."
  • Stuart: french form of english stewart, meaning "house guard; steward." in use by the english and scottish.
  • Eumann: scottish gaelic form of english edmund, meaning "protector of prosperity."
  • Bruce: scottish surname transferred to forename use, possibly meaning "woods; thicket." it was originally a norman french baronial name but the exact location from which it was derived has not been identified and the number of possibilities are numerous. In use by the english.
  • Ross: scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from the gaelic word ros, meaning "headland, promontory."
  • Anstice: english and scottish name derived from latin anastasia, meaning "resurrection." popular in the 13th century. 
  • Laird: scottish name meaning "landowner."
  • Marsaili: scottish gaelic form of latin marcia, meaning "defense" or "of the sea."
  • Iagan: scottish form of irish gaelic aodhagán, meaning "tiny little fire."
  • Eanraig: scottish gaelic form of english henry, meaning "home-ruler."
  • Adair: variant spelling of scottish adaire, meaning "the ford of the oaks." 
  • Lessie: feminine pet form of scottish unisex leslie, meaning "garden of hollies."
  • Kyle: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the name of various places derived from the gaelic element caol "narrow," hence "slender." compare with another form of kyle.
  • Lilias: scottish form of latin liliana, meaning "lily."
  • Eiric: variant form of scottish gaelic oighrig, possibly meaning "new speckled one."
  • Rhona: old scottish name, possibly meant to be a feminine form of english/scottish ronald, meaning "wise ruler." 
  • Artair: scottish form of celtic arthur, possibly meaning "bear-man." 
  • Wylie: irish and scottish equivalent of english willy, meaning "will-helmet."
  • Micheil: scottish gaelic form of greek micha?L, meaning "who is like god?"
  • Muireadhach: scottish gaelic name composed of the elements muir "sea" and cath "battle," hence "sea warrior."
  • Adamina: scottish feminine form of hebrew adam, meaning "earth" or "red."
  • Kirk: english surname transferred to forename use, originally an english and scottish name for someone who "lives near a church," derived from the old norse word kirkja, meaning "church." 
  • Steaphan: scottish gaelic form of french stéphane, meaning "crown."
  • Jamey: variant spelling of english/scottish jamie, meaning "supplanter."
  • Muircheartach: scottish gaelic name composed of the elements muir "sea" and ceardach "skilled," hence "skilled seaman."
  • Ciorstaidh: pet form of scottish gaelic cairistìona, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."
  • Jinty: scottish form of french jeanne, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Senga: scottish name, probably derived from the gaelic word seang, meaning "slender."
  • Carbrey: anglicized form of gaelic cairbre, meaning "charioteer." in irish and scottish use.
  • Jamesina: scottish feminine form of english james, meaning "supplanter."
  • Jennet: scottish feminine form of english john, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Elspet: variant spelling of scottish elspeth, meaning "god is my oath."
  • Còiseam: scottish gaelic form of roman latin constantine, meaning "steadfast."
  • Ealasaid: scottish gaelic form of greek elisabet, meaning "god is my oath."
  • Jeane: variant spelling of scottish jean, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Benneit: scottish gaelic form of greek benediktos, meaning "blessed." 
  • Greer: scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, derived from a contracted form of gregor, meaning "watchful; vigilant." 
  • Duibhshíth: old scottish gaelic name composed of the elements dùbh "black" and síth "peace," hence "black peace."
  • Daw: pet form of scottish gaelic dàibhidh, meaning "beloved." compare with another form of daw.
  • Olghar: scottish gaelic form of french olivier, probably meaning "elf army."
  • Ùisdean: scottish gaelic form of old norse eysteinn, meaning "island stone."
  • Arabell: variant spelling of scottish arabel, meaning "lovable." 
  • Ainsley: scottish habitational surname transferred to unisex forename use, composed of the old english elements ansetl "hermitage" and leah"meadow, pasture," hence "hermitage meadow."
  • Tadg: variant spelling of irish/scottish gaelic tadhg, meaning "poet."
  • Cailean: scottish gaelic name meaning "whelp; young pup."
  • Davey: pet form of scottish gaelic dàibhidh, meaning "beloved." compare with another form of davey.
  • Caointean: scottish gaelic form of old french quentin, meaning "fifth."
  • Monroe: scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from irish munro, meaning "from the mount on the river roe," in ireland, where the family came from. 
  • Caoidhean: variant spelling of scottish gaelic caointean, meaning "fifth."
  • Craig: scottish surname transferred to forename use, from the name of various places named from gaelic creag, meaning "rock."
  • Gregor: scottish form of latin gregorius, meaning "watchful; vigilant."
  • Chrìsdean: variant spelling of scottish crìsdean, meaning "christ-bearer."
  • Alaisdair: variant spelling of scottish gaelic alaistair, meaning "defender of mankind."
  • Jamison: variant spelling of english/scottish jamieson, meaning "son of jamie."
  • Teàrlag: feminine form of scottish gaelic teàrlach, meaning "instigator."
  • Alison: norman french form of old high german adalheid, meaning "noble sort." in use by the english and scottish.
  • Eòin: scottish gaelic form of greek ioannes, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Ailith: either a middle english form of anglo-saxon æthelgyth, meaning "noble war," or a variant spelling of scottish gaelic alyth, meaning "ascending, rising."
  • Dina: short form of scottish murdina, meaning "sea warrior." compare with another form of dina.
  • Deòrsa: scottish gaelic form of greek georgios, meaning "earth-worker, farmer."
  • Mungo: old scottish pet name derived from brythonic my-nghu, meaning "dear one." it was recorded in latin in the 6th century as carissimus amicus, meaning "dearest friend." 
  • Hendry: scottish form of latin henricus, meaning "home-ruler."
  • Ramsay: scottish surname transferred to forename use, from a place name composed of the old english elements hramsa "wild garlic" and eg "island," hence "wild-garlic island."
  • Dùghall: scottish form of irish gaelic dubhghall, meaning "black stranger."
  • Jock: scottish form of english jack, meaning "god is gracious."
  • Catrìona: modern scottish gaelic form of greek aikaterine, meaning "pure."
  • Muiredach: variant spelling of scottish gaelic muireadhach, meaning "sea warrior."
  • Shug: pet form of medieval scottish huchon, meaning "heart," "mind," or "spirit."
  • Daividh: variant spelling of scottish gaelic dàibhidh, meaning "beloved." 
  • Eachann: scottish gaelic name composed of the elements each "horse" and donn "brown," hence "brown horse." hector is an anglicized form.
  • Dùbhghlas: scottish gaelic name composed of the elements dùbh "black, dark" and glas "stream," hence "black stream."
  • Cuithbeart: scottish gaelic form of anglo-saxon cuthbeorht, meaning "bright fame." 
  • Ruiseart: scottish gaelic form of old high german ricohard, meaning "powerful ruler."
  • Cairistine: scottish gaelic form of latin christina, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."
  • Ronald: english and scottish name derived from old norse rögnvaldr, meaning "wise ruler."
  • Glen: scottish name derived from the word gleann, meaning "valley."
  • Teàrlach: scottish gaelic form of irish gaelic toirdhealbhach, meaning "instigator."
  • Sgàire: scottish gaelic form of the old norse byname skári, meaning "sea-mew," another name for the common seagull.
  • Eilidh: pet form of scottish aileen, meaning "beauty, radiance."
  • Kirstine: scottish form of latin christina, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."
  • Cuithbrig: scottish gaelic form of anglo-saxon cuthbeorht, meaning "bright fame." 
  • Calum: scottish form of latin columba, meaning "dove."
  • Ciorstag: pet form of scottish gaelic cairistìona, meaning "believer" or "follower of christ."
  • Davy: pet form of scottish gaelic dàibhidh, meaning "beloved." compare with another form of davy.

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