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Celtic Names

A service that offers a variety of boy & girl baby names, including Celtic boy & girl baby names with name, meaning, origin and gender.


 

Here are some Celtic names that we went over when we were naming our baby. We had a hard time but were happy when we found the perfect Celtic name.

  • Maoilios — Scottish form of Myles.
  • Morven — (Celt) "mariner". Morvin.
  • Carr — "from the marsh"; derived from the Norse word for "marsh". Cathair, Cary.
  • Gelvinak — (gel-VIN-ak) Cornish name for the bird "curlew", and bardic name of Richard Gendall, editor and activist for Cornish language revival.
  • Bret — "from Britain". Brit.
  • Alor — (AH-lohr) Name of 6th C. bishop of Quimper who signed a peace treaty with the Roman Empire. St. Alor is the patron saint of Tremeoc.
  • Ailean — (AY-luhn) "handsome"; also from Old Irish ail "noble" + dim. -an. Anglicized as Alan, related from the Breton language.

  • Caw — a name from old legends.
  • FÁELÁN m Ancient Irish Older form of FAOLÁN
  • Maitias — (muh-THY-uhs)(H) "gift of god"; version of Mathias. Matthias, Maithias.
  • Sithchean — a druid who disguised himself as a smith and tested all the sons of the King of Tara to see who was fit to be the next king; only Niall completed the test satisfactorily.
  • Carlin — (kar-lin)(Gael) "little champion". Carley, Carlie, Carling.
  • Howell — "remarkable" or "attentive"; "alert one". Howell.
  • Camden — "from the winding or crooked valley". Camdin, Camdan.
  • Gilmore — (gil-MOHR) "servant of Mary".
  • Séarlas — (SHAHR-las)(OFr) "full-grown, manly"; Irish version of Charles. Searlus.
  • Pilib — (PEE-lib)(Gr) "lover of horses". Philip, Filib.
  • Adam — (H) "son of the red earth". Adhamh (A-thuhv). Anglicized version of Irish Gaelic Ádhamh; Scottish Gaelic Ádhamh. Pet form: Adie.
  • Elphin — name of the son of Gwyddno in old legends; in Taliesin stories, he rescued the infant Gwion Bach, later named Taliesin, from a salmon weir.
  • Rory — Gaelic Ruairidh (ROO-uh-ree) from Gaelic ruadh "red".
  • Cadwaladr — (kahd-WAHL-ah-der) from Welsh cad "battle" + gwalar "ruler, leader". 7th C. saint and ruler of northern kingdom of Gwynedd.
  • Uinseann — (WIN-shen)(L) "conqueror"; Irish version of Vincent. Uistean, Uisdean.
  • Adwr — "coward".
  • Fionan — (FIN-ee-ahn) "fair". Finnian, Fionn.
  • Teithi — name of one of Gwynnan's sons in old tales.
  • Herve — (HAYR-vay) Name of a popular saint, son of the bard Hyvarnion and is wife Rivanone. Patron saint of bards. Harvey.
  • Ffodor — son of Ervyll in old tales.
  • Adda — Welsh version of Adam, "of the red earth".
  • Albanwr — "one from Scotland".

  • Ruadan — (ROO-an) from Old Irish ruad "red-haired". Son of Bress and Brighid, and fought with the Fomorians against the Tuatha De Danann. Ruadhan, Rhodan.
  • Guaire — common name of early Ireland meaning "noble or proud".
  • Conor — "wise aid"; form of Connor.
  • Gwyr — "from Gower".
  • English: Popular variant of Brian
  • Dunlop — "muddy hill".
  • CAOMH m Ancient Irish Masculine form of CAOIMHE
  • Nodens — variant of the sea god Llud Llaw Ereint.
  • Lludd — "from London" or from the god Llud Llaw Ereint (similary to Irish Nuada and Greek Neptune). Llundein.
  • Anwir — "liar".
  • MADDOX Celtic: Beneficent
  • Ennissyen — a giant Welshman related to Bran the Blessed and started the war with the Irish, which led to the death of Branwen and her son.
  • Gwenole — (gway-NOH-lay) Name of a 6th C. saint who founded the monastery of Landevennec.
  • Carrick — "rock" or "dweller of the rocky cape". Caroq, Carraig.
  • Mael Coluim — (MAL KOL-um) "servant or devotee of Colm". Maeolcholuim.
  • Gearóid — (GAHR-ohd) Irish form of Gerald, from ancient name Gelgeis, from gel "shining". May also mean "spear-mighty" and come from the Anglo-Normans. Gearalt, Garalt, Gerald, Garret.
  • Brevalaer — (bray-VAH-layr) Fr. Old Breton bran "raven" + uualatr "prince". Name of an early bishop, about whom little is known.
  • Wren — "ruler".
  • Conroy — (Celt) "wise man". Conn.
  • Evrawg — "from York".
  • Darcy — "dark".
  • Kitto — (KIT-oh) Cornish nickname for Christopher.
  • Trevelyan — "from Elian's home".
  • Prydwen — "handsome".
  • Briec — (BREE-ayk) from British name Brigacos, fr. Celtic brig "high, mighty". Born to a pagan family in Wales in 5th C., St. Brieg was converted by St. Germain of Auxerre, France. Briec founded several monasteries in Brittany, including * Saint-Brieuc. Brieg, Brieuc, Brieug.
  • Darren — (Gael) "great". Daron, Darrin, Darrion.
  • Eveny — (ehv-en-ee) name used in Derry County. Aibhne.
  • Sleibhin — (SLE-veen) from Old Irish sleib "mountain", meaning "mountain man", "mountaineer" or "man of the mountain". St. Slebine was abbot of Iona in Scotland in the 8th C. Slevin.
  • CUNOBELINUS m Ancient Celtic Possibly means "hound of Belenus" from the old Celtic element koun "hound" combined with the name of the god BELENUS... 
  • LUGUBELENUS m Ancient Celtic Older form (possibly) of LLYWELYN
  • Donal — (DAWN-uhl) from Old Irish name Domnall: domun "world" + gal "ardor, valor". Nicknames: Dolen, Dolyn (DAW-luhn).
  • Davis — "son of David"; variant of Dafydd.
  • Desmumhnach — "man of Muman" which was a tribe or territory in the Cork area of Munster before the Anglo-Norman invasion.
  • Lorne — from a place name in Argyll; Loarn was the name of one of the three sons of the legendary first Gael to arrive in Scotland from Ireland.
  • Raghnall — (REU-ull or RUHLL) "wise power"; Scottish form of Teutonic Ronald.
  • Brieg — "esteem".
  • Zethar — (ZETH-ahr) Cornish word for "seagull".
  • Eion — from of Ian. Eann, Ein.

  • Nedeleg — (nay-DE-lek) Breton word for Christmas, the equiv. of the French or English name Noel.
  • Donahue — (Gael) "dark hued" or "dark warrior"; related to Don, the Irish god.
  • Geraint — (GER-iint) from Celtic Gerontios similar to Greek gerontius "old". Geraint mab Erbin was hero of a medieval Welsh romance. A knight of the Round Table, renowned for his prowess in tournaments, the way he won his wife Enid. Also said to have beeen the king of Cornwall. A Welsh elegy to Geraint mab Erbin dates c. 900, and also mentioned as a warrior in the Gododdin.
  • Gillivray — "servant of judgment".
  • Harkin — from an old word for "dark red".
  • Birk — "birch tree".
  • Eóin Baiste — (OH-en BAHSH-chuh) John the Baptist.
  • Tor — natural son of King Pellinore, who was raised by a cowheard. The truth of his ancestry came out when he asked to be a Knight of the Round Table.
  • English Origin
  • Finneces — poet who lived by the River Boyne and guarded the Salmon of Knowledge for seven years. He planned to eat it himself to gain the knowledge, but his student Fionn mac Cumhail tasted it first. Finegas.
  • Dillus — legendary name of the Eurei's son.
  • Ector — Ector of the Forest Sauvage was Arthur's foster father in the Arthurian sagas.
  • Kynon — name of Clydno's son in ancient tales; possibly a variant of Kynan.
  • Carlton — from the Old English words Carla-tun "farmers' settlement".
  • EÓGAN m Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology Older Irish form of EOGHAN
  • Bryn — (BRIN) from Welsh for "hill". Popular for boys. Brynn, Brynley, Brinley (BRIN-lee).
  • CYNBEL m Ancient Celtic Derived from Welsh cyn "chief" and bel "war".
  • Barclay — Scottish, Irish; transferred use of the Scottish surname, which was taken to Scotland in the 12th C. by Walter de Berchelai, who became a chamberlain of Scotland in 1165. Probably derived from Berkeley in Gloucestershire, which is from OE beorc "birch tree" + leah "wood or clearing". In Ireland, its been anglicized in the form of Parthalán.
  • Talan — (TAHL-an) from Cornish tal "forehead". Name found in the Bodmin Manumissions*.
  • Laughlin — (LOFF-lin or LOCK-lin) "servant of St. Secundinus". Lanty, Lany, Leachlainn, Loughlin.
  • Mal — Irish shortened version of names starting with "mal".
  • Anghus — (AHN-guhs) from Old Irish oen "one" + gus "vigor". Manx equiv. of the Scottish and Irish name Angus.
  • Kerron — (KER-uhn) Manx version of Old Irish name Ciaran.
  • Rob Roy — anglicized form of Rob Ruadh, "red Rob".
  • Rhyd — "from the ford".
  • Conan — "wise"; Scottish form of the Irish name. Connor, Conon.
  • Iago — (EE-ah-goh) Welsh version of James, "god's gift" or "supplanter".
  • Mac — "son of..."; used as a nickname for names beginning with Mac or Mc. Mack, Max.
  • Ofydd — Welsh version of Ovid, a Roman poet.
  • Neacal — (NEK-uhl) "victory of the people". Nicholas, Nicol, Niocal (NIK-ul).
  • Twrgadarn — "tower of strength".
  • Blaine — (BLAYN) "thin" or "lean". Blain, Blane, Blayne.
  • Eanna — (eh-nah?) possibly "birdlike". Ennae.
  • Morvran — name of Tegid's son.

  • Sheridan — "wild one" or "untamed". Seireadan.
  • Payl — (PAHL) Manx form of Paul.
  • Esras — (EHS-ras) master of wisdom in Gorias, one of the the four cities that the Tuatha De Danann came from; he later gave Lugh the victory spear, one of the Tuatha's treasures.
  • Neven — (NAY-ven) Name of an early saint.
  • Dunham — (Celt) "dark man; black man".
  • Peder — (PAYD-er) Cornish form of Peter.
  • Bryce — "quick-moving". From name of 4th C. St. Bricius of Tours, France, name is Celtic origin. Bricius' cult was brought to Scotland by the Normans. Brice.
  • Cillian — (KEEL-yan) "war or strife"; variant of Ceallach. Keallach, Killian.
  • Keir — from a clan name, der. from the Old Irish ciar "dark".
  • Gwrddywall — legendary name of Evrei's son.
  • ÁEDH m Ancient Irish Variant of ÁED
  • Gerallt — (GER-alht) Welsh form of Gerald.
  • Merlin — "by the sea". the great sorcerer of the Arthurian sagas; his father was from the Otherworld, his mother was earthly. Legend says he learned all his magic from Nimue (also known as Morgan, Viviane, Lady of the Lake, and Queen of the Fairies); old legend says he is guardian of the Thirteen Treasures of Britain that he locked in a glass tower on Bardsey Island. Welsh tradition says Myrddin still sleeps in a hidden crystal cave. The Welsh name Myrddin means "hawk".
  • Quigley — from a word meaning "from the maternal side".
  • Alar — (AH-lahr) Name of the patron saint of goldsmiths and blacksmiths, and the protector of horses. Alaric (ah-LAH-reek), Laric (LAH-reek).
  • Seumas — (SHAY-muhs) "the supplanter" or "substitute"; Gaelic form of James. See also Hamish, derived from the genitive case of Seumas.
  • Donovan — "dark or brown warrior". Donvan.
  • Colm — (KUHL-uhm) from Latin columba "dove". 6th C. St. Colm Cille (Columba) "dove of the church" is one of the most important Irish saints, with Patrick and Brigid. Born in Donegal to a branch of the royal Ui Neill clan, Colm Cille was banished to Scotland for allegedly copying a book without its owner's permission. Founded the monastery on Iona and converted pagan kings of Scotland to Christianity. Colum, Columba, Colman.
  • Neasán — (NESH-ahn) Irish saint name; variant of Nessa. Nessan.
  • Manus — (MAH-nuhs) Traditional Manx name, from Latin name Magnus "great".
  • Mabsant — legendary name of one of Caw's sons.
  • Bodb — (BOVE) Bodb the Red was a son of The Dagda and suceeded his father as king of the Tuatha De Danann. At Lough he had a sidhe, underground fairy palace.
  • Wyndham — "village near the winding road".
  • Angawdd — name of the son of Caw in legends.
  • Rhisiart — (RHISH-art) Welsh form of Richard, "strong ruler".
  • Erskine — "from the height of the cliff" or "dweller of the top of the cliff"; from a clan name based on the name of a place on the banks of the Clyde, near Glasgow. Derivation is uncertain. Kinny, Kin.
  • Maolruadhan — (mal-ROO-ahn) "servant of St. Ruadhán". Melrone.
  • Conway — (Gael) "hound of the plain".
  • Nerth — name of Cadarn's son in old tales.
  • Conwy — (CON-oo-ee) personal name from the river in northern Wales, from the Irish Gaelic name Connmhaighe, "hound of the plain".
  • Barris — "son of Harry". Barrys.
  • Piran — (PEER-an) "prayer"; the Irish saint of miners had this name.
  • Daigh — (DEHV or DAVE?) "flame or fire".
  • Odgar — name of one of Aedd's sons.
  • Ionhar — (YOWR, or YO-ver)(Teut) "archer". Ivor.
  • Fearghus — (FAHR-gus or fay-REES) from Old Irish fer "man" + gus "strength, vigor"; "super-choice". Fergus mac Roich, foster-father of Cu Chulainn, was a hero of the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley. Renowned for his strength and stamina both on the battlefield and the bedroom. Fergus Finbel (Fergus Wine-Mouth) was a poet of the Fianna. Classic, anglicized Fergus (FER-guhs).
  • Cathaoir — (KAH-heer)(Celt) "battle lord" or "warrior". Cathair (KA-heer).
  • Blaez — (BLAYS) from Old Breton word for "wolf". Bleiz.
  • Gorman — from a word meaning "dark" or "swarthy"; male or female name. Gormain.
  • Gormant — name of Rica's son in old tales.
  • Lugh — (LOO) from Celtic lugu "bright". Name of a Celtic god found in Irish and Welsh mythology.
  • Celtic Male Names of Cornwall

  • Phelan — from a word meaning "wolf"; variant of Faolan.
  • Flinn — form of Flynn; "son of the redhaired man".
  • Rylie — form of Riley; "valiant".
  • Hefaidd Hen — name of Rhiannon's fahter in ancient legends, he ruled part of the Underworld.
  • Macallister — "son of Alistair". Mcallister, McAllister, MacAllister.
  • Shanley — (SHAN-lee) "small", "ancient", or "child of the old hero". Seanlaoch (SHAWN-loch?).
  • Flann — (FLAHN) from Old Irish flann "blood red" or "redhead, ruddy". Flann has been the name of poets, scholars, abbots, saints, queens and kings. Flann Feorna was king of Kerry in the 8th C., and an ancestor of the O'Connors. Male or female name. Flainn, Floinn, Flannan, Flanagan, Flannagain, Flynn, Flannery.
  • Deniel — (DAY-nyel, day-NOH-el) Breton form of Daniel. Deniel was the name of a founding saint of Brittany. Denoel.
  • Neil — (Celt) "champion". Neal, Niall, Neill, Neale.
  • Myrddin — (MUHR-din or MUHR-thin) from British moridunon "sea fortress". Welsh source of the name is from the sorcerer Merlin.
  • Teryrnon — (TAYR-non) from Celtic tigernonos "divine prince". In the Mabinogi, Teyrnon Twrf Fliant was Pryderi's foster father.
  • Brian — (ONorse) "strong" or "virtuous"; brought from Ireland, King Brian Boru. Briant, Brion, Bryan, Bryant.
  • Piran — (PEER-an) St. Piran was an Irish monk (prob. named Ciaran in Irish) who traveled to Cornwall and founded a monastery. Feast day — March 5, celebrated as the Cornish National Day. The Cornish flag bears the cross of St. Piran. Popular through 19th C. Pirran, Peran, Perran (PER-an).
  • Colin — "victor". Collin, Cailan, Cailean, CHulainn, Culin.
  • Devlin — (Gael) "brave or fierce". Devlyn.
  • NYNNIAW m Ancient Celtic Meaning unknown, presumably of Welsh origin... 
  • Alastar — (AH-lah-star) Irish form of Greek Alexander, introduced to Ireland via Scotland; modern Gaelic form Alasdair. Alistair, Allister, Alister, Alastir, etc.
  • Cadman — "warrior". Cadmon.
  • Archibald — Scottish of Norman French origin. Composed of elements ercan "genuine" + bald "bold, brave". Equivalent of Scottish Gaelic Gilleasbaig. Pet forms: Archie, Archy (Gaelic Eair(r)dsidh), Baldie.
  • Mian — (MII-uhn) Manx nickname for Matthew.
  • Lir — (LEER) father of Manannan mac Lir, his second wife turned his other four children into swans.
  • Emrys — (EM-rees) Welsh form of English Ambrosius, from Greek Ambrosios "immortal"; Emryus was an epithet of the magician and poet Myrddin (Merlin).
  • Maccoy — "son of Hugh". Mccoy, McCoy, MacCoy.
  • Riordan — (REER-dawn) from Old Irish rigbarddan "royal poet" or "the King's poet".
  • Murchadh — (MUR-kha or MOOR-uh-ka) from Old Irish muir "sea" + cath "warrior" = "sea-warrior". Name of several early kings and warriors. Murrough, Murphey, Murchach, Murphy, Morgan.
  • ROY Celtic Origin
  • Aichlinn — possibly a form of Echlin.
  • Corcoran — (kor-kor-ahn) "ruddy", "red" or "of reddish complexion". Corc.
  • Daveth — (DAH-veth) Cornish form of David, patron saint of Wales.
  • Earnán — "knowing, experienced".
  • ELISEDD m Ancient Celtic Derived from Welsh elus meaning "kind"... 
  • Caradoc — "beloved". Craddock, Cradoc.
  • Crannog — "lake dweller".
  • Munro — from clan name Mac An Rothaich, derived fr. the Gaelic name Rothach meaning "a person from Ro". The Munros are descendants of a family that came from a place near the river Roe in Derry, Ireland. Monroe, Monro, Munroe.
  • Lionel — a Knight of the Round Table, cousin to Lancelot, and brother to Bors.
  • Somairhle — (SOH-uhr-lyuh), from Old Norse summarliethi, "one who goes forth in the summer" (i.e. a Viking), or "a Viking raider". Anglicized as Sorley. Vikings would spend autumn and winter on the Isle of Man, then raid nearby Coasts of Scotland and Ireland in spring and summer. 11th C. chief of Clan Donald, Somerled, Lord of the Isles was half-Gaelic, half-Norse and ruled the Isle of Man, southern Hebrides and Argyll. Somerled, Sorley, Sorely, Samuel.

  • Rewan, Rumon — (ROO-an, ROO-man) Early Cornish bishop and saint. Name found in Bodmin Manumissions*.
  • Galvin — (GAHL-vin) from Old Irish gelbann "a sparrow".
  • Kade — "wetlands".
  • Manus — (MA-nuhs) from Latin magnus "great". Borrowed from the Norse, who in turn borrowed it from Carolus Magnus, Latin name for Charlemagne. Mannuss.
  • Daned — son of Oth in old tales.
  • Lancelot du Lac — son of King Ban of Benoic in France, Galahad's father, Knight of the Round Table and an unbeatable warrior. His affair with Queen Guinevere caused the death of many knights and the destruction of King Arthur's kingdom.
  • Casvelyn — (kaz-VEL-uhn) from British cad "battle" + Belinos, name of a Celtic fire god. Cornish form of Cassivellaunos, father of the British King Caractacus.
  • Beven — "son of Evan" or "youthful".
  • Brendan — (Gael) "raven". Bran, Bram, Broin (bree-AHN), Brennan.
  • FEDLIMID m & f Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology Variant of FEIDLIMID
  • Tristan, Trystan — (TRIST-ahn) from British name Drustan. In Arthurian Romance, the name of the nephew of King Margh (Mark) of Cornwall, and lover of Isolde.
  • Hogan — (Gael) similar to Hagan, meaning "youth".
  • Nevin — (Gael) "worshipper of the saints, nephew". Nevins.
  • Conri — (KAWN-ree) from Old Irish cu (con) "hound, wolf" + ri "king". An early recorded men's name. Conroy.

  • Fransez — (FRAHN-ses, FAHNSH) Breton forms of French name Francois. Fanch, Soa (SWAH), Soaic (SWAH-eek).
  • Criostal — (KREE-uh-stuhl) Gaelic form of Christopher. Produced Scottish surnames, Chrystal, Cristal, and MacCristal.
  • Bran — (BRAN) from Welsh for "raven" or "crow". Famous bearer-Bran Bendigeidfran (Bran the Blessed) in the Second Branch of the Mabinogi.*
  • Celtic Male Names of Scotland
  • Sedric — (SED-rik) form of Cedric; "chief".
  • Craig — from Gaelic place word creag "crag, cliff" or "steep rock"; "crag dweller" or "from near the crag". Also used as a surname. Craigen, Kraig, Craggie.
  • Hen Beddestyr — legendary name of Erim's son.
  • Felix — (L) "fortunate or lucky". Feidhlim (FELL-em).
  • Jocelin — Dim. form of Breton saint's name, Josse. Norman French brought to Scotland in the 12th C. Joselin, Joslin.
  • Cedric — (sed-rick)(Celt) "chieftain".
  • Gleann — (Gael) from gleann "valley"; male or female name. Glen, Glenn.
  • Shannon — (SHAN-ohn) "wise one"; from the River Shannon. Rarely, if ever, used as a name in Ireland.
  • JENNIFER Who doesn't know a Jennifer, or two, or three? And it's no wonder why. Jennifer reigned supreme on the baby name rankings...
  • Quillan — "cub". Quillon.
  • Alphonsus — Irish; Latinized form of Alfonso, used as an equivalent of Gaelic name Anluan. Uncertain origin, could be composed of an intensive prefix + an element meaning "hound" or "warrior". Pet forms Fonsie, Fonso.
  • Cadfael — (KAHD-file or KAHD-vil) either from words cad "battle" + ban "summit", or cad + mael "prince". Cadfan, Cadoc.
  • Aleyn — (AL-uhn) Prob. from the Old Irish name Ailin, derived from ail "noble".
  • Heddwyn — (HETH-win) from Welsh hedd "peace" + gwyn "shining, holy". Hedd Wynn was the bardic name of Ellis Evans (1887-1917), a poet and soldier killed in Flanders during WWI; and posthumously won the chair at the 1917 Eisteddfod. His life has become a symbol of the futility of war.
  • Scully — (SKUHL-ee) (Gael) from a word meanign "town crier". Scolaighe.
  • Bran — (BRAWN) from Old Irish bran "raven". Bran was the name of a pagan Celtic god in both Irish and Welsh myth. Popular in the Middle Ages.
  • Payton — (L) "noble"; dim. of Patrick. Paton, Peyton.
  • Finn — (FIN) Old Irish name meaning "bright, shining". Fynn.
  • Duane — (Celt) "song". Dewain, Dwayne.
  • Tyrone — (teer-OHN) from Old Irish tir "land" + Eoghain "of Eoghan" (man's name). Name of a County in Northern Ireland and used as a first name.
  • Gwevyl — name of Gwastad's son in legends.
  • Tadhg — (TAYG)(Gr) "poet" or "honors god"; form of Timothy. Tadc, Tiomoid, Teague, Taidgh, Tiege.
  • Aneirin — "honorable" or "golden"; of uncertain original derivation. Original form Neirin, with the "A" added in the 13th C; may be derived from Irish Gaelic nári "noble, modest". The name also appears in Welsh mythology. Aneurin (modern form), pet form Nye.
  • Padraig — (PAH-drig or PAH-dreek) from Latin Patricius "noble". St. Patrick, patron saint of Ireland, was the first successful Christian missionary on the island. Patrick has only been a given name of children since 1700; considered too sacred earlier, children were given names Gilla Patraic "servant of Patrick" or Mael Patraic "devotee of Patraic". Padhraig, Paddy, Padraic, Patraig, Patrick.
  • Darby — (dar-bee) (Gael) "free man".
  • Cane — (KAYN) from Old Irish name Cathan: cath "battle" + the dim. -an.
  • Garrett — (Teut) "brave spearman" or "with a mighty spear". Garret, Garett.
  • Jakez — (ZHAH-kays) Breton form of Jacques.
  • Govan — name of one of Caw's sons in old legends.
  • Driscol — "interpreter". Driscoll.
  • Sweeney — "small hero"; variant of Suibhne. Suidhne.
  • Gaynor — "son of the fair-skinned man" or "son of the fair-haired one". Gainor, Gaenor.
  • Newlin — "dwells near the new pool".
  • Macdonald — "Son of Donald"; an important clan name, often used in Scotland as a first name.
  • Comhghan — (KOH-gahn, or CO-en) "twin". Cowen.
  • Teagan — "attractive".
  • Llacheu — name of one of Arthur's illigitimate sons by Lysanor in ancient legends. Borre, Boare, Lohot.
  • Abram — (A-brahm) "high father"; version of Abraham. Ábraham.
  • Devi — (DAY-vee) Breton form of David, patrion saint of Wales, revered in Brittany as well.
  • DIVA If for some odd reason you really want a high-maintenance daughter, then by all means embrace it and name your girl Diva...
  • Ard-Greimne — "high power"; father of Scathach and Aoife.
  • Sandy — "defender of man". Nickname for Alexander.
  • Patterson — "son of Pat".
  • Dafydd — (DAH-vith) "dearly beloved"; Welsh form of David. St. David is patron saint of Wales. Nicknames: Dafi (DAH-vee); Dai (DII); Deian (DAY-an); Deio (DAY-oh); Dewi (DE-wee).
  • Balfour — "pasture land".
  • Hugh — (Teut) "intelligence, spirit"; English name from German root hugi "heart, mind"; traditionally used in Scotland to anglicize the Gaelic names Eoghann, Uisdeann, Aodh.
  • Anwell — from the word for "beloved". Anwil.
  • Keith — as a personal name it means "the battle place"; from a surname, based on the place name, Ceiteach, in East Lothian.
  • Cador — (KAHD-ohr) from British cad "battle" + wur "man". A legendary ruler of Cornwall in the Dark Ages.
  • Perceval — name of a Knight of the Round Table. Percival, Parzival.
  • Gusg — legendary name of Achen's son.
  • Lug — Welsh version of Luke, "the bringer of light". Luc.
  • Conn — (KOHN) Ancient Irish name, poss. derived from cu (con) "hound, wolf"; "reason, intelligence". Conn Cethchathach (Conn of the Hundred Battles) was a high king of Ireland in legend. Claimed as an ancestor by the O'Connors, O'Donnells, O'Dowds, O'Flahertys, O'Neills, and O'Rourkes. Cuinn (KWIN), Con.
  • Roslin — (Gael) "little redhead".
  • Oidhche — from a word meaning "night".
  • Bogart — "bog" or "marshland".
  • Owain — (Celt) "born to nobility" or "lamb, young warrior". Owen, Uaine, Ewen, Eoin.
  • Colman — (KOHL-mawn) Dim. of Colm. In early records, there were more than 200 Irish saints by this name. Given name of St. Columbanus (c. 543-615), who founded several of most renowned monasteries in Eurpose, including Luxeuil in France and Bobbio in Italy.
  • Nerthach — son of Gwawrddur in legend.
  • Gofraidh — (GO-free-y) "god's peace"; variant of the Old German name Godfrey. Goffraidh, Godfrey, Gorry.
  • Wmffre — (OOM-free) Welsh form of Humphrey, "friend of the Huns". Wmmffre.
  • Loeiz — (LOH-ayz) Breton form of Louis.
  • Hannraoi — (HAN-ree)(Teut) "ruler of an estate". Henry, Einri (EHN-ree).
  • Frederick — (Teut) "peaceful ruler". Feardorcha (fee-ar-e-DOHR-ekh-e).
  • Gunn — from the Norse-Viking word for "warrior"; possibly "white".
  • Alsandair — (AHL-san-dare) Irish form of Alexander.
  • Macklin — (MAK-lin) "son of Flann". Macland.
  • Harailt — Scottish form of an Old Norse word for "leader".
  • Hoyt — from a word meaning "spirit" or "mind".
  • Floyd — "the hollow".
  • IUDICAEL m Ancient Celtic Old Breton form of JUDICAËL
  • Busby — "village on woodlands" or "village in the thicket".
  • Mochaomhog — name of a priest who cared for the swan-children of Lir. He made silver chains to hang around their necks so people could identify them as enchanted humans.
  • Coinneach — (KUH-nukh or KI-nek) from Old Irish name Cainnech, from cain "good, beautiful" or "fair one". 6th C. St. Cainnech founded monasteries in Scotland and Ireland, including Aghaboe in County Laois. The city of Kilkenny takes its name from him. Anglicized as Kenneth. Canice, Kenny.
  • Wadu — name of one of Seithved's sons in lengends.
  • Amhar — name of a son of Arthur in obscure Welsh legends.
  • Conlaoch — (KON-la) son of Cu Chulainn and Aoife.
  • Guthrie — (guhth-ree) "windy place".
  • Kenyon — "from Ennion's mound".
  • Cadell — from a word meaning "spirit of the battle" or "battler".
  • Aberthol — "sacrifice".
  • Erwan — (AYR-wahn) St. Erwan (1253-1303), also known by French name Yves. Patron saint of lawyers. He gained a lasting reputation as a church judge for his fairness and special attention to the poor.
  • Glastenen — (glahs-TEN-en) from Cornish word for "scarlet oak".
  • Tiarnach — (TEER-nahk or TEAR-nakh) from Old Irish Tigernach, from tigerna "lord, superior, chief". Name of several saints, including St. Tigernach of Clones. Tiarchnach, Tighearnach, Tierney
  • Sullivan — "black eyed". Suileabhan, Sully.
  • Tavish — "a twin"; form of Thomas. Tavis, Tavey, Tevis, Tevish, Tamnais.
  • Petrock — (PET-rok) St. Petrock and St. Piran were the two most important saints of early Cornwall. St. Pedrog founded a monastery at Padstow in the 6th C. He is usuall depicted with a stag, based on legend in which he protects the animal from hunters. Pedrog, Pedrek (PED-rok).
  • Laurence — (L) "crowned with laurel".
  • Angus — "unique choice, chosen one, unique strength". Scottish and Irish; anglicized form of Gaelic Aonghus/Aonghas (EUN-eu-uss), composed of Celtic elements meaning "one" and "choice". Name of an old Celtic god, and is first recorded as a personal name in Adomnan's "Life of St. Columba," where it occurs in the form Oinogus(s)ius as the name of a man for whom the saint prophesied a long life and a peaceful death. Almost certainly the name of an 8th C. Pictish king variously recorded as Omnust and Hungus. Aengus, Aonghus, Aonghas, Enos, Oengus, Ungus. Short form Gus; pet form Angie; feminine form Angusina.
  • Ryan — (Gael) from a Gaelic word meaning "little king; strong".
  • Caolfionn — (Keel-in) from the noun caol meaning "the slender one" + the adjective fionn meaning "fair haired". The masculine noun comes first and no alteration is required and in the Ulster dialect, the "f" naturally elides out to give an approximate pronunciation of Keelin.
  • English: Warrior; a medieval given name from abbreviations of surnames Chadwick and Chadwell. Chad is also a seventeenth-century saint...
  • Donnchadh — (DUN-uh-khuh) "brown lord"; "strong warrior"; from Old Irish name Donnchad: donn "brown" or "chief" + cath "battle". Name of the son of Brian Boru, King Donnchadh Donn (d. 1064). Traditional in O'Brien family. Donaghy, Donogh, Donagh (DOH-na).

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