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Celtic Names

A service that offers a variety of boy & girl baby names, including Celtic boy & girl baby names with name, meaning, origin and gender.


 

Here are some Celtic names that we went over when we were naming our baby. We had a hard time but were happy when we found the perfect Celtic name.

  • Ailín — (A-lin or ay-LEEN)(Gael) derived from Old Irish ail "noble". Alan, Allen.
  • MacBride — from the Irish meaning "son of the follower of St. Brighid". Mcbride, McBride, Macbride).
  • Cas — name of the son of Seidi in legends.
  • Gwalhaved — name of one of Gwyar's sons in old legends.
  • EVAN While Evan has been a go-to name in Wales for centuries, it's only recently become one of the "in" names in the US. The Welsh...
  • Niocol — (NEE-col)(Gr) "victory of the people". Nicol.
  • Mairtin — (MAHR-teen)(L) "warlike one". Martin, Martain.
  • Gilcolm — (gil-KAWLM) "servant of Saint Columba".

  • Eonan — (YOE-wun or YOH-nuhn) "youth"; from Old Irish name Adamnan, "little Adam". St. Adamnan (d. 704) was abbot of a monastery of Iona in Scotland; his writings contain the first mention of the Loch Ness Monster.
  • Irv — "handsome". Irving.
  • Kendrick — from a word meaning "son of Henry"; or "royal chieftain". Keondric.
  • Gweltaz — (GWAYL-tahs) Probably several early Breton saints.
  • Gael — (GA-el) Popular Breton name that may have originated as a nickname for Judikael.
  • Anynnawg — legendary name of the son of Menw.
  • Seith — "seven". Saith.
  • Aillig — "from the stony place". Ail.
  • Merril — "bright sea". Meryl.
  • Hicca — (HIK-uh) Cornish nickname for Richard.
  • Menw — name of Teirwaedd's son in old tales.
  • Eachan — (eh-kawn?) "horseman".
  • Éimhin — (EH-veen) from eim "prompt" or "ready" or "swift, active"; male or female. Evan, Evin.
  • Luchtaine — god of carpentry for the Tuatha De Danann and a member of the trio of smiths. Luchta.
  • Tudual — (TOO-dwahl) Prob. from the same source as the Welsh name Tudor: Celtic teutorigos "king of the land or tribe". St. Tudual was a 6th C. Welsh-born saint who founded several monasteries in Brittany. Tugdual.
  • Erbin — legendary name of Custinhin's son.
  • Coinneach — (KON-yokh or KUH-nyuhx) Fr. Old Irish Cainnech, derived fr. cain "good, beautiful"; "handsome face or head". St. Cainnech founded monasteries in Ireland and Scotland in the 6th C.; city of Kilkenny (Cell Coinneach) in Ireland takes its name from him. Identical to Irish name Cainnech; anglicized as Kenneth.
  • Diarmaid — (DEER-mit) "free man"; legendary member of the warrior band of Finn mac Cumaill. He had a beauty mark on his forehead that made any woman who saw it to fall madly in love with him. Diarmait, Diarmuid, Dermot, Dermod.
  • Adair — (Gael) place name meaning "from the oak tree ford" or "oak tree settlement". From a surname, maybe derived from an early Scottish pronunciation of English Edgar. Adaire, Athdar, Edgar.
  • Cianán — (KEE-nahn) dim. of Cian. Kienan, Kenan.
  • Callan — (KAH-luhn) from Old Irish name Ceallachan, derivation uncertain; may mean "someone who frequents churches" or "someone who is warlike".
  • Madoc — (MAH-dog) from British mad "fortunate, lucky". In legend, Madog ap Owain Gwynedd colonized N. America in the late 12th C.
  • Marrek — (MAHR-ek) Cornish for "horseman".
  • Broc — from an Old English word for "badger".
  • Kevyn — "from the ridge", or from Irish Gaelic Caoimhin, "gentle, lovable".
  • Barri — (BAHR-ee) prob. from Welsh bar "mound, summit, dune"; perhaps from the word for "boar". Island of Barry off Glamorgan coast is named for the 6th C. hermit, St. Barri, who took refuge there. The island became a popluar pilgrimage destination after his death.
  • DREST m Ancient Celtic Variant of DRUST
  • Peadair — (PED-dur or PAY-tuhr) "(the) stone"; Gaelic form of Peter. Peadar.
  • Rodhlann — (ROH-lan)(L) "fame of the land"; Irish version of Roland. Rowland, Rowland.
  • Calcas — name of the son of Caw in legends.
  • Connaghyn — (KAWN-a-huhn) from Old Irish cu (con) "hound, wolf" + cenn "head". Name of an early saint commemorated in the parish of Onchan.
  • Gobrwy — name of Echel Pierced Thighs in old stories.

  • Achaius — form of Eochaidh.
  • Saoirse — (SHAHR-sha?) "freedom" or "liberty"; male or female name.
  • ALAN Celtic: Handsome
  • Lynch — from a word meaning "mariner". Linch.
  • Merritt — (MAIR-it or MEHR-it) from a word meaning "valuable" or "deserving". Meritt.
  • Teague — "bard" or "poet, philosopher". Teagan.
  • Ol — legendary name of Olwydd's son.
  • Fionn — (FYUHN or FIN) from Old Irish finn "bright, fair". Anglicized as Finn. Finn mac Cumhaill was a hero, poet and sometime outlaw who led a band of warriors known as the Fianna. Fiann, Finian.
  • Mallolwch — name of the legendary king of Ireland who married Branwen.
  • Tulley — "at peace with God". Taicligh.
  • Doncan — (DAWNG-kuhn) from Old Irish Donnchad: donn "brown" or "chief" + cath "warrior".
  • Struan — (STROO-uhn) Prob. from Gaelic struan "stream". Once a common name among the men of Clan Donnchaidh (Robertsons), who owned lands of Struan in Perthshire.
  • Owney — old Irish name meaning "elderly". Oney.
  • Gobban — (GOH-ban) from Goibniu, the ancient god of smithcraft who worked for the Tuatha De Danann. Goban.
  • Sulyen — variant of Sulien; and name of one of Iaen's sons in old tales.
  • Pennar — (PEN-ahr) from Welsh pen "head" + ardd "hill, height".
  • Glendan — (Gael) place name for "settlement in the glen" or "fortress in the glen". Glendon, Glenden.
  • Gavin — "white hawk"; popular in the Middle Ages, as Gawain in England, and Gauvain in France; in Arthurian legends and literature, Gawain was one of the boldest knights of the Round Table; Gavin Dunbar was Archbishop of Glasgow and Chancellor of Scotland in the 16th C., and est'd the first National Court of Justice. Gilchrist Fr. Gaelic Gille Criosd (gil-yuh-KREE-uhst) meaning "servant of Christ"; esp. popular in the Middle Ages. Gawain, Gawen, Gaven.
  • Eryi — "from Snowdon".
  • Gwres — name of Rheged's son in old tales.
  • Anyon — from the Welsh word for "anvil".
  • Brian — legendary name of the son of Turenn.
  • Rhain — (RHIIN) from Welsh rhain "spear, lance". Rhainallt (RHIIN-alht) "hill".
  • Pembroke — "headland".
  • Beli — name of an Irish sun god (Bel), also known in Wales. In later tales, Beli was the brother-in-law of the Virgin Mary. The original Beli was connected closely with the druids and their rituals. Beltane is his festival, May 1. Beli Mawr, Belenus, Belinus.
  • Renny — (REN-ee) Irish version of the French Rene, "small but strong". Raighne.
  • Briac — (BREE-ahk) Breton form of Irish name Brian. 6th C. Breton St. Briac.
  • Dónal — (DON-al or DOH-nal) from domun "world" + gal "ardor" or "valor"; "world-mighty". Popular since the earliest times. Domnall was the name of five high kings including Domall Ilchelgach (Donal of the Many Treacheries), ancestor of the O'Neills and MacLoughlins. Domhnall, Domnall, Donall, Donald.
  • Laurys — (LEOO-ruhs) Manx form of Lawrence.
  • Bearchan — (BAR-uh-kawn or BAR-uh-hawn) Dim. of Bearach. Common name in early Ireland; name of numerous saints, including Bearchan of Inishmore in Galway, whose feast day is April 6.
  • Tearlach — (TCHAR-lokh or CHAR-luhx) Gaelic "well-shaped", "full-grown" or "manly". Popular name among the Stewarts. Often anglicized as the unrelated name Charles, which means "strong and manly".
  • Nentres — one of eleven kings who revolted against Arthur; he later married Elaine and became the King's ally.

  • Macadam — "son of Adam".
  • Madron, Madern — (MAD-ruhn, MAD-uhrn) from British mad "lucky, fortunate". Name of an early Cornish saint whose well was the source of miraculous cures until the 1800s.
  • Emhyr — "ruler". Emyr.
  • Mac Dara — (mahk-DAH-ra) from Old Irish mac "son" + dara "oak" = "son of the oak". St. Mac Dara of Connemara is the patron of fisherman.
  • Ewan — Gaelic Eoghann (YOH-uhn) Fr. Old Irish name Eogan "born of the yew tree": eo "yew" + gein "birth" = "born of the yew tree". Traditional clan name, including Clan Campbell and Clan Chattan. Ewen of Locheil, chief of Clan Cameron, was a celebrated opponent of Oliver Cromwell. Ewen, Euen, Euan, Ewhen, Owen, anglicized as Hugh.
  • Gildas — (GIL-dahs) 6th C. monk and saint Gildas was the author of De excidio Britanniae (The Destruction of Britain), in which he blamed his fellow Welsh for allowing Anglo-Saxons to overrun Britain. St. Gildas venerated in Brittany as St. Gweltas and credited there for performing numerous miracles.
  • Cairell — (KAHR-el or KAIR-el?) name of several Irish saints. Carroll?.
  • Urien — traditional name of the king of the land of Gorre who was associated with the Round Table. He married Morgan le Fay, their son was Owain.
  • Malvern — "bare hill".
  • Wynne — (WIN)(Celt) "white, fair". Winn, Wynn.
  • Kim — "leader".
  • Gillean — (GIL-yan) Gaelic Gilla Eoin (gil-yuh YOWN), "servant of (St.) John". The Clan Maclean (son of Gillean) takes its name from the 13th C. warrior, Gillean of the Battle Axe; Gillean is not to be confused with the English woman's name Gillian (Jillian), fr. Juliana.
  • Achaius — "friend of horses".
  • Masek — (MAHZ-ek) Cornish form of the Welsh name Madog, meaning "lucky, fortunate".
  • Cadarn — "strong".
  • Quinlan — "strong" or "well-shaped, athletic". Quinlin.
  • Gowerr — "pure".
  • Cearbhall — (KAHR-e-val or KEE-a-ruhl) "full-grown, manly"; from Old Irish name Cerball or Cerbhall. Name of early kings of Ossory and Leinster; traditional among O'Dalys. Cearbhall O Dalaigh was a president of the Irish Republic; anglicized as Carroll.
  • Kelvin — "a narrow river" or "from the narrow river". Kelvyn.
  • Pedr — (PEDR) Welsh form of Peter, "rock". Pedran (PED-rahn), Petran (PET-rahn).
  • Glewas, Glewyas — (GLOO-ahs, GLOO-yahs) from Cornish glew "clear, bright". Name of an early saint, nephew of St. Petroc.
  • Einion — "anvil". Einian.
  • Dow — "dark-haired. Dubg.
  • Aindréas — (AHN-dree-ahs) "manly"; Irish form of Andrew. Aindrea, Aindrias, Aindriú.
  • Cain — "clear water".
  • Gregory — (Gr) "vigilant".

  • Ronald — (Teut) "wise power" or "king's advisor"; form of Ranald. Ronal, Ronnold, Ranald, Raghnall.
  • Arranz — (AHR-anz) Cornish word for "silver".
  • Calbhach — (KAHL-vach?) from the word meaning "bald".
  • Padrig — (PAHD-rig) Welsh form of Padraig (Patrick), "noble", patron saint of Ireland.
  • Angor — form the Welsh word for "anchor".
  • Amhlaoibh — (A-leev)(Norse) "ancestral relic"; IrGael form of Olaf, an Old Norse name introduced to Ireland by Viking settlers. Anglicized Auliffe, Olave, Auliff, Humphrey.
  • Hamish — (HAY-mish) Gaelic form of James.
  • Rory — (ROHR-ee)(Teut) "famous ruler"; variant of Ruairi. Ruaidhri, Roderick.
  • Davis — "David's son". Dave, Davidson, MacDaibhidh.
  • Revelin — form of Rolan; "famed throughout the land".
  • Finlayv — (Gael) "little (blond) fair-haired soldier". Finlay, Findlay, Findley, Finlea, Finn.
  • Lunn — "warlike". Lonn, Lun.
  • JUDOC m Breton, Ancient Celtic Breton form of JOYCE
  • Patric — (PAHT-reek) Manx form of Padraig (Patrick), patron saint of Ireland. Nicknames Paden (PAHD-jeen), Paton (PAHT-uhn).
  • Muir — (MYOOR) A surname based on the Gaelic place name muir "a moor" or "marshland".
  • Eudav — son of Caradawg in ancient stories.
  • Leith — "broad river". Leathan.
  • Stratton — "river valley town".
  • Dempsey — (DEM-se) "proud".
  • Gowan — from Gaelic gobha "a smith"; blacksmiths were VIP's in early Celtic culture, often having an aura of magic about them. Gow, Gobha.
  • Marrec — (MAHR-ek) from Old Breton word for "horseman" or "knight".
  • Aghy — form of Eochaidh.
  • Lennan — (LAN-awn) Old Irish work meaning "lover, sweetheart". Leannan.
  • Brody — (bro-dee) "man from the muddy place, ditch".
  • Roarke — (ROHRK) "famous ruler". Roark, Ruarc, Ruark, Rorke, Ruaidhri, Rourke.
  • Donat — "given".
  • Denzel — (DEN-zel) A place name that became a first name. Denzil.
  • Maddox — "the benefactor's son".
  • Teilo — (TAY-loh) A 6th C. saint who founded a church at Llandeilo Fawr in Dyfed. After his death, a dispute arose between the churces of Llandeilo, Llandaf, and Penally on where Teilo's remains were to be kept. His body miraculously triplicated so that no one would be left out.
  • Caer Llion — "one from Caerleon (Castle of the Lion)".
  • Connell — (Celt) "high and mighty".
  • Gilchrist — (gil-KREEST) "servant of Christ".
  • Bowie — (BOO-ee)(Gael) "yellow-haired, blonde". Bow, Boyd.
  • Maghnus — (MAKH-hus) "great"; variant of Manus, or the Norse-Viking Magnus.
  • Cowan — (KOW-uhn) from Old Irish name Comgan. Name of an 8th C. saint who founded churches in Ireland and Scotland and may have been active in Man as well.
  • IUDOCUS m Ancient Celtic (Latinized) Latinized form of Judoc (see JOYCE).
  • ALMA Celtic: Good
  • Irish Origin
  • Cristall — (KRIS-tuhl) Manx form of Christopher.
  • Doire — "from the grove". Dhoire.
  • Rogan — (RO-gahn) "red-headed". Ruadhagan, Rowe, Rowen, Rowyn, Rowin, Rowan, Ruadhan.
  • Jock — (H) "the supplanter"; older Scottish form of James and Seumas. Jack, Seoc.
  • Gwyddawg — name of Menestyr's son in old tales.
  • Neued — legendary name of Tringad's father.
  • Duer — (Celt) "heroic".
  • Mungo — Nickname of Kentigern, patron saint of Glasgow, from Old Irish mo "my" + cu "hound, wolf", also possibly "amiable"; long used as a man's first name.
  • Keene - "wise, learned".

  • Tigernan — from tigern "lord". Tighearnan, Tiarnan.
  • Muireadhach — (MUR-e-thekh) from muiredach "lord, master"; or "sea-lord". Murry, Murray, Muiredach, Muirioch.
  • Cadeyrn — (KAHD-ayrn) from Welsh cad "battle" + teyrn "prince".
  • Arlen — "pledge". Arland, Arlyn.
  • Gaelic: Stranger
  • Orry, Gorry — (OH-ree, GOH-ree) After King Godred I, Norseman who ruled the Isle of Man as well as parts of Ireland and Scotland from 1079-95. The Milky Way in Manx is known as Raad Mooar Ree Gorry (The Great Way of King Orry). It is said that when Godred landed on Man, people asked where he came from, and he pointed to the stars.
  • Gillean — "servant of St. John". Gillan.
  • Llyr — "of the sea"; a Welsh sea and water god, similar to Irish Lir. Listed as father of Bran and Branwen. Lear.
  • Treasach — (TRAH-sak) from Old Irish Tressach "fierce, warlike". Tracy.
  • Pryderi — (pra-DAYR-ee) In the Mabinogi, Pryderi was stolen by a monstrous claw on the night of his birth and deposited in Teyrnon Twrf Fliant's stable. He renamed the child Gwri Gwallt Euryn (Gwri Golden-Hair) and raised him, until it was clear he was the missing son of Pwyll and Rhiannon. When returned to his mother, her first words were "I would be relieved of my care (pryder) if this were true!" So he was renamed Pryderi.
  • Seanán — (SHAW-nawn or SHAH-nan) from Old Irish sen "ancient". Seanan was the name of 20 Irish saints, including St. Senan of Iniscathy. Seanan, Shannon, Senan, Sinon.
  • FEDELMID m & f Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology Variant of FEIDLIMID
  • Domnall — (DON-al) "world-mighty"; popular in ancient Ireland. Donal, Domhnall.
  • Alan — (AH-lan) Introduced to England by the Breton contingent of William the Conquerer's forces. St. Alan was a 6th C. bishop of Quimper.
  • Kavan — (KAH-vahn) from Old Breton kad "battle". Name of an early saint whose feast day is March 10.
  • Kevin — (Celt) "kind, gentle, lovable".
  • Llyn — "from the lake".
  • Bradwr — "traitor"; variant of Brad.
  • Ailfrid — (AL-frid) Irish Gaelic form of Alfred, from OE ælf "elf, supernatural being" + ræd "counsel".
  • NINIAN m Scottish, Irish, Ancient Celtic Meaning unknown... 
  • Barry — "spearman". Irish anglicized form of Gaelic name Barra (Old Irish Bairre), a short form of Fionnb(h)arr (see Finbar). Pet forms: Baz, Bazza (Australia).
  • Sualtam — husband of Dechtire and foster-father of Cu Chulainn. His severed head warned men of Ulster about Maeve's attack.
  • Proinnsias — (PRON-shee-as)(Teut) "free"; Irish version of Francis (of Assissi). Frank.
  • Ea — (EH)(Celt) "fire" form of Aodh. Hugh.
  • Gwyglet — name of a hero in the epic The Goddoddin; he fought and died in the battle of Catreath (Catterick).
  • Farrell — (Celt) "heroic, courageous". Fearghal (FAHR-gahl), Farr.
  • Celtic Male Names of Wales
  • Farquhar — Gaelic Fearchar (FER-uh-xuhr or FER-a-char) Fr. Old Irish fer "man" + cara "friendly"; "friendly man"; "one especially dear"; "strong man". King Ferchar the Long, of Lorne (d. 697), was ancestor of the Chattan and Farquarson clans. Faarquar, Farquharson, Ferchar.
  • Arzhur — (AHR-zoor) Fr. Celtic artos "bear" or fr. Latin name Artorius. In Breton tradition, King Arzhur (Arthur) was made a saint. Arzhul (AHR-zool).
  • Bradan, Braddan — (BRAH-duhn) from Name of a Cornish saint. Paris of Kirk Braddan on Man is dedicated to him.
  • Corrigan — from a word meaning "spearman". Corey, Corrin.
  • QUINN Compact, striking, and drawn from the Gaelic surname, O'Cuinn, Quinn represents "wisdom and intelligence." The number of...
  • Firth — from the placename, meanings "arm of the sea".
  • MARVIN Celtic: Lives by the sea
  • Connla — "son of Conn". Conlaoch.
  • Ardal — (AHR-dawl) from Old Irish art "bear" + gal "fury, valor"; also from Old German "eagle power". A version of Arnold; Irish anglicized form of Gaelic name Ard(gh)al, from ard "high" or art "bear" + gal "valour". Artegal, Arthgallo.
  • Kenn — "clear water".
  • Flannery — form of Flann; "redhead".
  • Bearach — (BA-rak) from Old Irish berach "pointed, sharp". Berach was the name of many Irish saints, including the patron siant of the O'Hanlys. Berach.
  • Eus — name of Erim's son in legends.
  • Alexander — (Gr) "helper or defender of mankind". Alex, Alick, Alsandair, Alsander, Alastrom, Alastrann.
  • Blane — from Gaelic bla "yellow". Name of an important Scottish saint who was Bishop of Kingarth in late 6th C.; several Scottish churches are named Kilblane in his honor. Blain, Blaine, Blayne.

  • Naomhin — (NUH-veen) fr. naomh "saint". This is a traditional first name in Galloway and Ayreshire. Nevin.
  • Fraser — "strawberry fields"; from French surname de Frisselle, brought to Scotland by Normans in 13th C. The French word for strawberries is "fraise", and there are strawberry plants are on the Fraser coat of arms.
  • Kennedy — (KI-ne-dee or KEN-eh-dee) from Old Irish Cennetig: cenn "head" + etig "ugly"; or "helmeted chief". Kennedy became a surname while still used as a first name. Cennetig mac Lorcain was the father of high king Brian Boru. Cennetig.
  • BLAIR Celtic: From the plain lands
  • Corcan — (KAWR-kuhn) from Old Irish corc "heart" + -an, dim. suffix.
  • Caledvwich — the name of Excalibur in Welsh legends.
  • Siseal — (SEE-sil)(L) "blind;" Irish form of Cecil.
  • DONNDUBHÁN m Ancient Irish Composed of the Gaelic element donn "brown" combined with dubh "dark" and a diminutive suffix.
  • Feandan — "from the narrow glen".
  • Manannan mac Lir — (mah-NAN-awn mac leer) chief Irish sea god, son of the sea god Lir. see the Deities page for more info.
  • Coireall — (kohr-EE-ahl)(Gr) "lord". Kerrill, Cyril.
  • Brian — (BREE-uhn) Deriv. uncertain, but may be from Celtic root brig "high, noble". Popular on Man since early times.
  • Weyland — a god of smiths, said to have made Excalibur. His name is still associated with several sites in Wales and Britain.
  • Gillecroids — from the Gaelic word for "Christ-bearer" or "servant of Christ".
  • Pasgen — (PAHS-gen) from Welsh Pasg "Easter".
  • Donn — (DON or DOWN) from Old Irish donn, meaning both "brown" and "chief". Mythological god of the dead, who lived on an island off the of Munster. Popular until the end of the 19th C., esp. with the Maguires and Kennedys. Donnagan, Donnan (DUN-ahn).
  • Kyle — (Gael) "handsome", "near the chapel", "one from the strait", or "a narrow piece of land". Kyele, Kiel.
  • Kermichil — from a Gaelic word meaning "from Michael's fortress".
  • Finnian — (fin-ee-an) from finn "fair, pale-colored". Finnen.
  • Searbhreathach — (SAR-vra-huhkh) "noble judge"; Irish version of Justin.
  • Brad — from the word for "treason".
  • Tiarnan — (TEER-nawn) from Old Irish Tigernan: tigerna "lord, superior, chief" + dim. -an. Popular in early and medieval Ireland; name of several kings and saints, including St. Tigernan of County Mayo. Tier, Tighearnach, Tiernan.
  • Maclean — from "son of Leander". Mclean, McLean, Maclaine, MacLean.
  • Lachlan — "belligerant"; from Lachlann (LAKH-luhn or LAX-luhn) a Gaelic word formerly used to designate the "land of the Vikings" or "land of lakes or fjords"; the Maclachlans take their name from Lachlan Mor (Big Lachlan) a chief who lived near Loch Fryne in the 13th C. Lachlann, Laochailan.
  • Labraid — "speaker". Labhraidh.
  • Conlaed — (kon-lee?) derived from connla "prudent, chaste" + aed "fire". Conlaodh.
  • Tringad — legendary name of Neued's son.
  • Carbry — (KAHR-bree) from Old Irish name Bairbre. Parish of Kirk Arbory on Man is dedicated to an Irish saint by this name.
  • Donnell — related to Donal and Domnall; Doneal, Donnelly.
  • Donald — (Celt) "world ruler, brown stranger". Donal, Doughal, Don.
  • Granwen — name of one of Llyr's sons in legends.
  • Keresyk, Kerezik — (ke-REZ-ik) from British caractacus "amiable", also the name of a king of early Britain. Carasek (ka-RAZ-ek).
  • Gallagher — from the word for "eager helper".
  • NELSON Celtic: Son of Neil
  • Cinnéide — (kih-NEH-juh) "helmeted-head". Kennedy.
  • Mikael — (MEE-kael, MEE-kel) Breton form of Michael. Kaelic (KAEL-eek, KEL-eek).
  • DUBHTHACH m Ancient Irish Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" in combination with a second element of unknown meaning.
  • Arvel — "wept over".
  • Dugan — variants Dubhan, Duggan.
  • Lennon - "little cape".
  • Rhys — (RHEES) from Welsh rhys "ardor, passion, rash". Reece, Rice, Reis, Riess, Rhett.
  • Fagan — (FAY-gan) "little fiery one".
  • Ha* ley — from a word meaning "ingenious".
  • Fearghas — (FER-uh-guhsh) "of manly strength" or "dear one"; fr. Old Irish fer "man" + gus "strength, vigor"; or "first choice". Fergus mac Eirc is considered the ancestor of the Gaels. Fergus.
  • Ysberin — name of Fflergant's son in old tales.
  • Eiryn — name of Peibyn's son in old stories.
  • Vailintín — form of Valentine, Latin for "healthy".
  • Gaelic: Bright
  • Maeleachlainn — (MAL-uh-khlin) "servant of St. Secundinus". Malachy, Milo, Miles.
  • Bairtleméad — Irish Gaelic form of Bartholomew.
  • Michal — (MIK-uhl) Manx form of Michael. Also Mayl (MAYL).
  • Breandan — (BRAWN-dan) Poss. a borrowing of Welsh word brenhin "king or prince". In the medieval Latin tale, The Voyage of Saint Brendann, the 6th C. Irish saint known as Brendan the Navigator explored regions perhaps as far as N. America in a leather-clad boat, or curragh; Brendan; Brendis, Brannon, Bryn, Breanainn (BREH-neen).
  • Cinead — Prob. Pictish in origin; in 843, King Cinead Mac Ailpin united Gaels and Picts in one kingdom, Scotia. Ceanag (KEN-uhk); anglecized as Kenneth; feminine form is Kenna.
  • Morgan — (MOHR-gahn) from Welsh mor "sea" or mawr "great, big" + can "bright" or cant "circle" or geni "born". Could mean "big circle", "bright circle", "bright sea", or "sea-born"; or "dwells near the sea". Male or female name. Most famous Morgan is probably Morgan la Fee, King Arthur's half-sister and famed sorceress. Morcan, Morgant (MOHR-gahnt).
  • Anwar — "wild".
  • Carrow — (CAR-aw) from Celtic cornu- "horned". Cornish word for "deer".
  • Aeducan — common dim. form of Aed in medieval Ireland. Aodhagan.
  • Arthyen — (AHRTH-yen) from Celtic artos "bear" + gen "to bear", hence "bear-borne".
  • Struthers — from a word meaning "brook". Sruthair.
  • Gruffen — "fierce lord". Gruffyn.
  • Cunningham — possibly "village of the milk pail".
  • Graham — from an Anglo-Saxon word for "warlike". Greum, Graeme, Gram "grain".
  • Kynwal — name of one of Caw's sons.
  • Beagan — "small" or "little one".
  • Pwyll — "son of Howell"; in ancient legends, he was the lord of Dyfed when he met Arawn, lord of Annwn, and took his place for a year in the Otherworld.
  • Gaeth — (GAYTH) Old Irish "intelligent, skillful".
  • Alister — (AWL-uhs-tuhr) Manx form of Alexander, introduced by way of Scotland. Alistryn (AWL-is-truhn).
  • Mael Iosu — (MAL YO-shoo?) "devotee of Christ"; at one time it was a name used among clergymen.
  • Amhuinn — "from the alder tree river".

  • Braigh — from the Gaelic word for "from the upper part".
  • Rhionganedd — name of a prince of Ireland in old legends.
  • Blaise — Merlin's mysterious teacher, he lived in Northumberland.
  • Demne — when Fionn was tutored by Finneces, he took this name.
  • Gordon — (GORSH-tuhn) from clan name based on a place name in Berwickshire, perhaps der. fr. British gor "great" + din "hill-fort"; possibly also "hero" or "from the cornered hill". Geordan, Gordie, Gordy, Gòrdon.
  • Cadfan — (KAHD-vahn) from Welsh cad "battle" + ban "summit". 6th C. saint associated with a healing well.
  • Puw — Welsh version of Pugh, "son of Hugh".
  • Todd — "fox".
  • Sioda — (SHEE-da) may mean "silk" or a pet form of a longer name.
  • Irving — (Gael) "handsome and fair". Earvin, Ervin.
  • Dugal — (DOO-guhl) from Old Irish name Dubhall: dubh "dark" + gall "a stranger". Name of a prince of Man.
  • Sloan — "warrior". Sloane, Slone.
  • BRENNUS m Ancient Celtic (Latinized) Latinized form of a Celtic name (or title) that possibly meant either "king, prince" or "raven"... 
  • Rhyawdd — name of Morgant's son in old tales.
  • Curry - "a marsh or an herb".
  • Garselid — a name from old legends.
  • Yestin — Welsh form of Justin.
  • Keiran — (KEER-an)(Celt) "dark-skinned".
  • Paddy — (pad-ee)(L) form of Patrick; "noble, nobleman".
  • Geordie — (Gr) "farmer"; form of George. Seòras.
  • Yann — (YAHN) Breton form of the French name Jean, equiv. of English John. Yannick or Yannig (YAH-neek).
  • Bideven — (bi-DEV-en) from Cornish word for "hawk".
  • Fionnlagh — (FYOOHN-ee-loo or FYON-lax) fr. Old Irish finn "bright, fair" + laoch "warrior"; "fair hero". Finlay, Finley, Findlay.
  • Fercos — name of Poch's son in old legends.
  • Sion — (SHON) Welsh form of John. Sioni (SHON-ee), Sionyn (SHON-een).
  • Jarlath — (JAR-leth) Name of 6th C. saint, teacher of St. Brendan the Navigator. Brendan told Jarlath to drive his chariot east and build a church where his wheel broke; it broke in Tuam, and he founded a church that became a great center of learning and art. Modern Irish Iarlaith (YAR-lath or YAHR-le).
  • Mabon — "the son"; name of a mysterious child in the Arthurian sagas; he was stolen from his mother at three days old and imprisoned at Gloucester. His story is told in Culhwch and Olwen.
  • Ardwyad — "protector".
  • Bercelak — known as the Green Knight in Arthurian stories.
  • Blathmac — (BLAW-vak) from Old Irish blath "flower" + mac "son". Popular in early Ireland. Blathmacc mac Con Brettan was an 8th C. poet.
  • Gwythyr — son of Greidyawl in old legends; also the name of the lord of the Upperworld.
  • Murchadh — (MOOR-uh-choo or MOOR-uhx) from Old Irish muir "sea" + cath "warrior"; also possibly "wealthy sailor", "sea protector" or "sea fighter". Murdo, Murdoch, Murtagh, Murtaugh.
  • Gamon — a name from old stories.
  • Rhodri — (RHOD-ree) from Welsh rhod "circle" + rhi "ruler". Rhodri Fawr (Rhodri the Great) was an important 9th C. king He was a renowned warrior, as well as the ancestor of many of the later dynasties of Wales.
  • Lonan — (LYO-nawn) from Old Irish lon "blackbird" + dim. suffix -an. Eight early saints had this name, including St. Lonan Finn.
  • CYNWRIG m Ancient Celtic Derived from Welsh cyn meaning "chief" and gwr meaning "hero, man", plus the suffix -ig indicating "has the quality of".
  • Innes — from Gaelic word for "island"; first a surname and clan name, then first name, male or female.
  • Drystan — Welsh version of Tristan, "full of sorrow".
  • Talek — (TAHL-ek) from Cornish tal "forehead". Bardic name of E.G.R. Hooper, third Grand Bard of the Cornish Gorsedh.
  • Niece — (NEES)(Celt) "choice". Aonghus, Neese.
  • Regan — see Raegan. Riagan.
  • Rhydderch — (RHUHTH-erx) from Welsh rhi "king" + derchafu "ascending". Rhydderch Hael (Rhydderch the Generous) was a king of the Old North in the 6th C. He fought alongside Urien Rheged and Morcant against the incursions of Anglians into the area that is now southern Scotland.
  • Malachy — (MA-la-kee)(H) Used in Ireland as an anglicization for Irish names beginning with mael "servant or devotee" such as Mael Maedoc and Mael Sechlainn. St. Malachy of Armagh was a church reformer in the 12th C. Maelachlainn, Milos.
  • Crìsdean — "Christ-bearer". Gaelic form of Christopher.
  • Amargein — (aw-VEER-een) from Old Irish ama "singing, song" + gein "birth". Most celebrated bearer of the name was the druid poet and judge of the Sons of Mil, legendary ancestor(s) of the Irish. He pronounced the first judgment given on Irish soil, and his magic ensured that the Sons of Mil would triumph over the Tuatha De Danann. A traditional name in the O'Cleary family.
  • Nairn — "river with alder trees".
  • Bret — (Celt) "from Brittany".
  • Gillespie — "son of the bishop's servant". Gillis.
  • Lúcás — (LOO-kahsh)(L) "bringer of light". Lucan.
  • Muirios — (MEER-ees) from Old Irish Muirgius: muir "sea" + gus "strength, vigor". Muirios was the name of several kings of Connacht.
  • Denholm — place name; prob. Denholm, Scotland, otherwise unknown.
  • Kieran — (KEER-an) "small and dark-skinned".
  • Elis — (EL-is) Welsh form of Elijah, from Greek Elias. Ellis (ELHis).
  • Oswallt — Welsh version of Oswald, "strength from god".
  • Dagonet — name of King Arthur's jester, who was made a knight and excelled in bravery during many tournaments.
  • MOCHÁN m Ancient Irish Derived from Irish moch "early" combined with a diminutive suffix.
  • Deverell — "from the riverbank".

  • Carney — (kar-nee)(Celt) "warrior" or "victorious". Cearnach, Kearn, Karney, Kearney, Car.
  • Breac — from the Celtic word for "speckled". Bryce, Brice.
  • Ergyryad — name of one of Caw's sons in old tales.
  • Iustig — name of one of Caw's sons in old legends.
  • Scanlon — (SKAN-lun) "little trapper".
  • Dillan — "faithful"; form of Dillon, Dylan.
  • Austin — (L) "venerable". Águistín (AH-guhs-teen).
  • Pòl — (PAHL) "little"; Gaelic form of Paul.
  • Lundy — (Scottish) place name for "grove near the island. " Lundie.
  • Edan — (Eh-dan or AY-dan)(Celt) "flame, fiery, zealous".
  • Celtic Male Names of Ireland
  • Drych — legendary name of the son of Kibddar.
  • Meven — (MAY-ven) 6th C. St. Meven founded the abbey of Saint-Meen in the Forest of Broceliande.
  • Austell — (AH-stel) A companion of St. Samson, Austell founded a church in Cornwall.
  • Morgan — (Celt) "sea warrior", "lives by the sea" or "from the sea"; possibly derived from the war goddess Morrigan. Morgun.
  • BRICIUS m Ancient Celtic (Latinized) Latin form of BRICE, probably ultimately of Gaulish origin.
  • English: Son of Neil.
  • CADEYRN m Ancient Celtic Means "battle king" from Welsh cad "battle" and teyrn "king, monarch"... 
  • Gilno — (GIL-noh) "servant of the saints".
  • Micheil — (MEECH-yell or MEE-hyel) "who is like God"; Gaelic form of Micheal.
  • Keeley — "handsome" or "beautiful and graceful". Kealey, Kealy.
  • Griogair — (GRI-kuhr) Gaelic form of the name of St. Gregory of Tours, France; name was brought to Scotland by the Norman French and widely used in the Middle Ages, and meant "vigilant"; derived from greigh "a flock or herd"; all forms of this name were officially banned for most of the 17th and 18th C.'s for alleged misdeeds of some clan members. Gregor.
  • Lovel — one of Gawain's illigitimate sons who was killed by Lancelot.
  • Llevelys — legendary name of Beli's son.
  • BRENNA Celtic: Raven, black-haired; also used as a variant of Brenda
  • Acair — variant of the word meaning "anchor". Acaiseid.
  • Eòghann — (YOE-wun) "youth". Gaelic spelling of Ewan.
  • OWEN There's just something about Owen that sounds sweet and likeable. Another vintage name that's now back in vogue, Owen is...
  • Eadoin — "blessed with many friends".
  • Eachann — (EU-chun) "steadfast". Scottish form of Hector.
  • Skelly — (SKEL-ee) "storyteller"; possibly from Viking influence and their word for bard, skald.
  • Siam — (SHAM) Welsh form of James.
  • Wallace — Origin is Anglo-Saxon word walas or wealas "a Celt" or "a stranger", source also of the words Wales and Welsh. First used as a surname in the border regions of Scotland, then used as a first name in memory of national hero William Wallace, who was executed by British authorities in 1305. Wallis.
  • Donnchadh — (DON-ah-choo) old Gaelic spelling of Duncan, meaning "dark-skinned stranger" or "dark-skinned warrior".
  • Cairn — the Welsh word for a pile of stones used as a landmark. Carne.
  • Breasal — (BREE-sal) "land of the young" or "land of the blessed". Hi Breasil was another name for Tir-na-Nog.
  • Aeneas — rare name; was quite common in Scotland as anglicized form of Aonghas; and in Ireland as anglicized form of Éigneachán, a personal name from éigneach "violent fate or death".
  • Sholto — from Gaelic sioltaich "propagator". A traditional first name among the Douglases.
  • Bevan — (Celt) "youthful warrior".
  • Caddoc — "battle-sharp" or "eager for war".
  • Mercher — Welsh form of Mercury, Roman messenger of the gods.
  • Pellinore — brother of Pelles, King of the Isles, and one of the greatest Knights of the Round Table.
  • Clennan — from a Celtic word for "servant of Finnian".
  • Ascon — (AS-kohn) Name of an early Irish saint active on Man, Easconn.
  • Fechine — possibly from fiach "raven," or from a word meaning "battle". Fechin.
  • Kentigern — from Old Irish cenn "head" + tigern "lord". The 6th C. St. Kentigern is the patron saint of Glasgow; he was said to be the son of Owein ap* Urien, an early Welsh hero of the Old North.
  • Rooney — (ROO-nee) "redhaired". Ruanaidh.
  • Sorley — (SOHR-lee) from Old Norse summarliethi "one who goes forth in the summer", i.e. a Viking.
  • Buchanan — from a surname derived from a place name in Stirlingshire. Source is prob. Gaelic bocan "a young male deer".
  • Doane — "dune dweller".
  • Taran — (TAH-ran) After a statue of an ancient Celtic thunder god with the name Taran inscribed on it was unearthed in Brittany in the 1700s, he was venerated as a saint. Taranis was the name of a deity worshipped by ancient Celtic people from Britain to Yugoslavia.
  • Gwion Bach — original name of Taliesin.
  • Monahan — (mohn-ah-han) "monk". Monohan.
  • GALCHOBHAR m Ancient Irish Means "foreign help" in Irish.

  • Uisdean — (OOSH-jan or OOS-juhn) "intelligent", "spirit"; Gaelic form of Hugh, also possibly from Austin and/or Augustine.
  • Bledri — (BLED-ree) from Welsh blaidd "wolf" + rhi "king" = "leader of the warriors or outlaws".
  • Sheehan — (SHEE-an) "little, peaceful". Shean, Siodhachan.
  • Lugaid — son of Cu Roi and Blanaid, and known as the Son of Three Dogs because his mother had lain with three men with cu in their name. When Lugaid cut off Cu Chulainn's head, the sword slipped and cut off his own hand.
  • Kincaid — "battle chief".
  • Cedric — "bountiful".
  • Gair — "small". Geir, Gaer.
  • Aidan — (AY-den)(Celt) "flame, fire, fiery"; derived from word aedh "fire". Edan, Aodhan (EH-thahn); anglicized form of Irish Aodán; dim. of Aodh; Edan.
  • Kellen — "mighty warrior". Kaelan, Kael, Kailen, Kallen, Kaylen, Kaylan, Kealan, Kelan.
  • Greidyawl — obscure name from old tales.
  • Riok — (REE-ohk) from Old Breton ri "king". Name of an early Breton saint, disciple of Gwenole. Riec, Rieg (REE-ek).
  • Clyde — (Scottish) name of the famous Scottish river.
  • DUBHSHLÁINE m Ancient Irish Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" and either slán "defiance" or Sláine, the Gaelic name of the River Slaney.
  • Setanta — birth name of the warrior Cu Chulainn.
  • Cadoc — (KAHD-ok) from Welsh cad "battle". Originally a nickname for Cadfael. Cadoc was the name of one of the most important Welsh saints. St. Cadoc was carried on a cloud to Northern Italy, where he became a bishop and was martyred.
  • Galloway — once referred to a Scotsman from Galloway, Scotland. Galway.
  • Kinnon — "fair-born".
  • CUIDIGHTHEACH m Ancient Irish Old Irish byname meaning "helpful".
  • Korey — variant of Corrigan.
  • Goron — (GOHR-ohn) Cornish for "hero". Name of an early saint associated with a sacred cave and well near Gorron.
  • O'Neil — "son of Neil". O'Neal, O'Neill.
  • Gourgy — (GOOR-gee) from British gur "man" + ci (cun) "hound, wolf". Name found in the Bodmin Manumissions*.
  • Edern — name of the son of Nudd in legend.
  • Aeneas — "worthy of praise"; anglicization of Aengus. Aenéas.
  • Leodegrance — name in old tales given as the King of Cameliard, who was Guinevere's father.
  • Kildare — an Irish county.
  • Keddy — Scottish form of Adam.
  • Accalon — a champion from Gaul and the lover of Morgan le Fay in the Arthurian sagas. They plotted to steal Excalibur, but Merlin helped Arthur to beat Accalon in battle.
  • RONAN Celtic: Little seal
  • Nathair — from the Celtic word nathdrack "snake".
  • Lot — king of Orkney and Lothian and husband of Morgause. Lotha.
  • Dinsmore — possibly means "fortified hill".
  • DONALD Celtic: Ruler of all
  • Gilbert — legendary name of the son of Cadgyffro.

 

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