<link rel="stylesheet" href="../../../css/skel.css" /> <link rel="stylesheet" href="../../../css/style.css" /> <link rel="stylesheet" href="../../../css/style-desktop.css" />

Celtic Names

A service that offers a variety of boy & girl baby names, including Celtic boy & girl baby names with name, meaning, origin and gender.


 

Here are some Celtic names that we went over when we were naming our baby. We had a hard time but were happy when we found the perfect Celtic name.

  • Maelwys — name of Baeddan's son in old tales.
  • Llwyd — (LHOO-eed) from Welsh llwyd "grey, holy". Lloyd.
  • Baldie — Scottish pet from of Archibald.
  • Peadar — (PA-der)(Gr) "stone". Peter, Peadair.
  • Cadwallen — "battle dissolver".

  • Gawen — (GOW-en) Cornish form of Gawain. Popular through late 17th C.
  • Ewen — (AY-ven) Popular since earliest times; a saint's name. Even.
  • Garnock — "dwells by the alder tree river".
  • Ceithin — name of the uncle of Lugh in old tales.
  • Bradwen — name of the son of Moren in ancient legends.
  • Ysgawyn — name of Panon's son in old tales.
  • Piaras — (PEER-as or PEE-a-ras) "stone"; Irish form of Peter, from French-Norman namePiers. Peter, Perais, Ferus, Pierce, Piers.
  • Korneli — (kohr-NAY-lee) St. Korneli is revered in the region of Carnac as the protector of horned beasts.
  • Aeddan — Welsh form of Aidan.
  • Gaelic: Ruler of all
  • Sithny — (SITH-nee) from Celtic sith "peace". Patron saint of mad dogs. In tradition, god revealed to him that he was going to be the patron saint of girls. The saint was unhappy with this, so God threatened to make him the patron saint of mad dogs instead. St. Sithny replied "I'd rather have mad dogs than women any day!" Sick dogs are taken to drink at his well on his feast day, August 4.
  • Séamas — (SHAY-muhs or SHEE-a-mus) from James (H); "the supplanter, one who supplants". Seamus, Seumus, Shemus, Shamus.
  • Kyle — from a surname based on the Gaelic word caol "narrow", the name of a strait in Ayrshire.
  • Kerwin — "small and dark" or "little jet-black one". Kervin, Kerwyn.
  • Elowen — (el-OH-wan) from elew Cornish word for "elm".
  • Síomón — (SHEE-mohn)(H) "god is heard"; Irish version of Simon.
  • Dywel — legendary name of the son of Erbin.
  • Crofton — "a small town with little houses and fields".
  • Llwydeu — name of Nwython's son in old stories.
  • Muirfinn — "dweller by the shining sea".
  • Kelyn — name of one of Caw's sons in old tales.

  • Dubhghlas — from dubh "black" + glas "blue". More popular in Scotland than Ireland. Douglas.
  • Faolán — (FEH-lahn or FAY-lawn) from Old Irish faol "wolf" + dim. -an. Faolan was the name of fourteen saints, and ten warriors in Finn mac Cumhaill's band. Source of the surnames Phelan and Whelan. Anglicized Fallon, Faelan, Felan..
  • Mawgan — (MAW-gan) from British maglo "prince" + ci (cun) "hound, wolf". Name of a 6th C. Cornish saint. Popular in 17th C. Cornwall.
  • Fionnbharr — (FYUHN-var or FIN-ver) from Old Irish finn "bright, fair" + barr "hair". Eight Irish saints by this name. Best known is 6th C. St. Finnbarr, patron of Cork and of Barra in the Outer Hebrides. Anglicized as Finbar, Finnbarr, Barram, Bairrfhoinn; nicknames Barra, Bairre.
  • Annraoi — (AHN-ree)(Teut) "ruler of an estate". Henry, Harry.
  • Melkin — a pre-Merlin prophet and poet mentioned in the Annals of Glastonbury Abbey.
  • Edern — (AY-dern) from Welsh edyrn "great". St. Edern was a Welsh hermit who went to Brittany in the 9th C. He welcomed to his hermitage a deer that was being chased by a hunter. It is said the deer never left his side.
  • Flynn — (Gael) "son of the red-haired man". Flin, Flinn.
  • Ferghus — (FER-uhs) from Old Irish name Fergus.
  • Giolla Dhé — (GIL-a DEH) "servant of god". Gildea.
  • Logan — from Gaelic place word lag "hollow" + dim. suffix -an; "from the little hollow". Logan is used as the name of several places in Scotland, and has been a surname since the 12th C. and a very popular name in recent years.
  • Ithel — "generous lord".
  • Leod — Norse-Viking name adopted by Scots, meaning "ugly". The Clan MacLeod claims the Viking Chief Leod as their ancestor.
  • Baird — (BAYRD) "bard, poet, ballad singer, traveling minstrel". Bairde, Bar, Bard, Barr.
  • Gwencalon — (gwayn-KAH-lohn) Old Breton name, fr. gwenn "bright, shining" + calon "heart".
  • Margh — (MAHR) Cornish word for "horse", and name of the King of Cornwall in the tale of Tristan and Isolde.
  • Keenan — "little Keene" or "little ancient one". Keanan, Kienan.
  • Culvanawd — name of the son of Gwryon in old tales.
  • Feoras — (FEE-uh-rus)(Gr) "stone". Pierce.
  • Finlo — (FIN-loh) from Old Irish name Finnlug: finn "bright, shining" + lugh, the name of a Celtic god.
  • Glen — (Celt) "glen or narrow valley" or "a secluded, woody valley". Glyn, Glynis, Glenn.
  • Bricriu — (bree-cri-oo?) a mischief-maker at the court of Conchobar, where he instigated a rivalry among the heroes Cu Chulainn, Conall, and Loegaire.

  • Ragallach — king of Connacht, he abandoned his infant daughter because of a prophecy that he would die at his daughter's hand.
  • Tomos — (TOHM-ohs) Welsh version of Thomas, "twin". Nickname Twm (Tom) (TOOM). Twm Sion Cati (1530-1609) was an antiquarian, poet and outlaw, and known as the Welsh Robin Hood.
  • Eiddoel — name of Ner's son in old tales.
  • Jowan — (JOO-an, JOH-an) Cornish form of John.
  • Dabhaidh — (DA-ee-vee or DAEE-vee) "beloved"; Gaelic form of David. St. David, son of King Malcolm III and Queen Margaret, was King of Scots from 1124-53. Daibhidh.
  • Uilliam — (UHL-yahm, or WIL-yam)(Teut) "resolute protector"; from Old German Wilhelm. William, Liam.
  • Vaughn — "small one". Vychan.
  • Vaddon — "from Bath".
  • Laegaire — (LEERY) possibly "calf-herd". Laoghaire.
  • Donnan — (DUN-ahn) "brown".
  • Hen Was — "old servant".
  • Withell — (WITH-el) Cornish word for "lion".
  • Tormey — Irish adaption of the Viking god Thor, "thunder spirit". Tormaigh.
  • Meallan — (MAHL-an) from Old Irish mall "lightning" + dim. suffix -an. Three early saints whose Feast days are Jan. 28, Feb. 7, and Oct. 26.
  • Cathbad — (kah-bad?) legendary name of the druid and son of Conchobar mac Nessa who prophesied Cu Chulainn's warrior valor and the sorrow that Deirdriu would cause Conchobar of Ulster.
  • Logan — (Gael) from a word meaning "meadow" or "from the (little) hollow".
  • Gilmore — (Gael) from words meaning "devoted to the Virgin Mary".
  • Faing — "from the sheep pen". Fang.
  • Juan — (JOO-uhn) Manx nickname for John.
  • Olwydd — "tracker".
  • Mael — legendary name of Roycol's son.
  • Tormod — (TOR-ro-mit) "from the north"; Scots-Gaelic form of Teutonic Norman.
  • Barram — version of Barrfhionn.
  • Lochlainn — (LOCH-lan, LOKH-lan or LOCK-lin) from Old Irish word for the land of the Vikings, Lakeland. In fairy tales, Lochlainn was the imaginary abode of the princess-who-must-be-rescued. Popular in Middle Ages. Lochlain, Lochlann, Lakeland, Laughlin, Lochlyn, Lochlynn, Loughlin.
  • Murdach — (MUHR-dahx) from Old Irish muir "sea".
  • Tegvan — name of Cerridwen's son.
  • Heilyn — name of Gwynn's son in old legends.
  • DONOVAN Celtic: Dark-haired
  • Raghnall — (RAN-al) "wise or mighty power"; from the Norse-Vikings. Reginald, Reynald, Randal, Randall, Reynold.
  • Dacey — "southerner".

  • Ehangwen — a name from old legends.
  • Paol — (PAOHL, POHL) Breton forms of Paul. Breton St. Pol Aurelian (492-572) was known as a slayer of dragons and a founder of monasteries, notably Saint-Pol-de-Leon. Pol.
  • Ailbhe — (AL-vee) from Celtic albho "white". Ailbe, Alby, Albert, Ailbhis (AL-vis).
  • Fingal — from Old Irish finn "bright, fair" + gall "stranger". J. Macpherson transformed the Irish and Scottish folk hero Finn mac Cumaill into a Scottish king named Fingal in his Ossianic poems.
  • Gwydion — (GWID-yon) from Welsh gwyd "knowledge" + -on, divine ending. Gwydion ap Don was a powerful magician in the Mabinogi. In Welsh, Caer Gwydion (Gwydion's Castle) is the Milky Way.
  • Garwyli — name of Gwyddawg Gwyr's son in old legends.
  • Nechtan — (neck-tahn) husband of the goddess Boann and keeper of a magic well of knowledge which had nine hazel trees around it.
  • Powell — "son of Howell"; name of one of the Welsh kings.
  • Nikolaz — (nee-KOH-lahs) Breton form of Nicholas. Kolaz (KO-lahs), Kolazic, Kolazig (koh-LAH-zeek).
  • Iona — name of a French king in old legends; also the Celtic name for the Isle of Anglesey off the northern Wales coast.
  • Mellan — possibly derived from an early word meaning "lightning".
  • Anrai — Irish Gaelic form of Henry. Einrí.
  • Ahern — "lord of the horses".
  • Ieuan — (YAY-an) from Latin Johannes. Ieuan is the Welsh version of John, "god is gracious". Ioan (YOH-uhn), Iwan.
  • Miach — (MEE-ahk?) son of the Tuatha De Danann physician Dian Cecht; he was slain by his fther when he and his sister Airmid restored Nuada's physical hand.
  • Dunham — from the Gaelic word for "brown".
  • Gordon — (Gael) "hero"; a Scots-Irish name used in Ulster. Gordain.
  • Macmahon — (MAK-MAN)"son of Mahon". Mcmahon, McMahon, MacMahon.
  • Albert — (OGer) "noble, bright". Ailbe, Alby.
  • Galehodin — Lancelot's brother; he became the Duke of Saintongue.
  • Hafgan — (HAHV-gahn) from Welsh haf "summer" + can "song"; male or female name. Name of an Otherworld deity who annually fights Arawn for rulership of the Underworld.
  • Eanruig — "rules the home". Scottish form of Henry. Eanraig.
  • Fallon — variant of Faolan. Fallamhain.
  • Conchor — (KAWN-uhr) from Old Irish name Conchobar: cu (con) "hound, wolf" + cobar "desiring".
  • Iuchar — a brother of Brian mac Tuirenn, who killed Lugh's father Cian.
  • Donnelly — "brave, dark man, a brave black man".
  • MATHGHAMHAIN m Ancient Irish Means "bear" in Irish Gaelic... 

  • Blair — "plain" or "field". Blaire, Blayre.
  • Sulien — (SIL-yen) from Welsh sul "sun" + geni "born". Originally the name of a Celtic sun god. 11th C. Welsh bishop of St. David's named Sulien was reputed to have been the most learned man in all Wales.
  • Glendower — "one ofr Glyndwer". Glyndwer.
  • Larkin — "rough and fierce".
  • Cradelmass — a king of north Wales whom Arthur defeated at tge start if his reign.
  • Keefe — (KEEF)(Gael) "cherished, handsome, lovable". Keeffe.
  • Meryn — (MER-uhn) Old Cornish name. Merryn.
  • Labhrás — (LAU-rahsh)(L) "a laurel bush". Labhras, Labras, Laurence.
  • Math — (MAHTH) from Celtic math "bear". According to the Mabinogi, Math ap Mathonwy (MAHTH mahth-ON-oo-ee) was king of N. Wales and a powerful magician; and helped creat a flower-wife for his great-grandson Llew.
  • Réamonn — (RYEH-mon or RAY-moon)(Teut) from ragan "counsel" + mund "protection"; "mighty protector"; Irish version of Old German Raymond, brought by the Anglo-Normans in the invasion. Reamonn, Remann, Raymond, Mundy.
  • Ren — "ruler". Ryn.
  • Artúr — (AR-toor) "noble, bear man". Irish form of Arthur, first recorded in Ireland in the 9th C. Artair, Arthur, Artus, Arth, Art, Atty.
  • Creighton — "near the creek".
  • Garmon — (GAHR-muhn) from Latin name Germanus "a German". Saint of the early 5th C., served as bishop on Man. Jarmon, Jarman (JAHR-muhn).
  • Gow — (Gael) "a smith".
  • CHAD Celtic: Defence
  • Fife — from a surname der. from the name of ancient kingdom in eastern Scotland. Some claim the name is from Fib, the name of one of the seven sons of Cruithne, the legendary ancestor of the Pictish race. Fyfe, Fibh.
  • Machonna — (mah-XAW-nuh) from Old Irish ma "my" + cu (con) "hound, wolf". 6th C. Manx St. Machonna's Feast day — Nov. 12.
  • Evan — "young warrior"; Irish form of John. Ewan, Ev, Evin.
  • Caeoimhin — (kwee-veen?) "gentle". Caemgen.
  • Caedmon — "wise warrior".
  • Glyn — (GLIN) "one who lives in the glen or valley"; from Welsh glyn "valley".
  • Celtic Male Names of the Isle of Man
  • Ainsley — (AYNS-lee) "one's own meadow"; occasionally used as a female name; probably originally a local name, either Annesley in Nottinghamshire, from Old English An "one, only" + leah "wood or clearing"; or Ansley in Warwickshire, from OE ansetl "hermitage" + leah. Ainslee.
  • Damhlaic — (DAW-lik)(L) "like the Lord". Dominic, Doiminic (DOH-min-ic).
  • Dyvynarth — legendary name of the son of Gwrgwst.
  • Mores — (MAW-ruhs) from Old Irish name Muirgius.
  • Dooley — "dark hero".
  • Drew — "wise". Dru, Dryw.

  • Dalziel — "small field". Daziel, Dalyell.
  • Kenyon — "white or blond hair". Kenyan.
  • Nevan — "holy". Naomham (NAU-ahn).
  • Uchdryd — name of Erim's son in ancient tales.
  • Conan — (KAH-nan) from Celtic kuno "great, high". Name of a legendary Cornish king and a real 18th C. bishop of Cornwall. Kenan (KEN-an).
  • Benedigeidfram — "blessed"; applied to the god Bran. A giant in Welsh mythology, Bran the Blessed was brother to the goddess Branwen.
  • Romney — "dwells near the curving river". Rumenea.
  • Seren — (SER-en) Welsh word for "star". Sirona, from the same Celtic root, was an ancient Gaulish goddess of hot springs. Male or female name.
  • Riocárd — (REE-kard)(OGer) "powerful ruler"; Irish form of Richard, brought by the Anglo-Normans. Richard, Risteard (REESH-tyard).
  • Bwlch — name of the son of Cleddyv Kyvwlch in old tales.
  • Llwybyr — legendary name of one of Caw's sons.
  • Nessan — "stoat".
  • English Origin
  • Kiernan — (KEER-nan) "dark-skinned".
  • Evan — (EV-ahn) Welsh form of John. Ioan (YOH-ahn); Ianto (YAHN-toh); Iwan (YEW-ahn); Eoin, Ieuan (YAY-ahn).
  • Uther — (OOTH-er) Name of King Arthur's father, Uther Pendragon. Popular in the 16th C. and 17th C.
  • Lennox — "with many elms" or "from the field of elm trees".
  • Batt — from Bartley (Aramaic) "ploughman". Bat.
  • Árón — possibly "high mountain"; Irish version of Aaron.
  • Cassidy — (kass-ih-dee)(Gael) from a word meaning "clever"; or "curly hair".
  • Douglas — "from the dark water"; "dark river or stream" or "dark blue-green". Scotland, Ireland, and Wales all have a river of this name. Dubhghlas (DOOG-lass). *see Dougal.
  • Rónán — (ROH-nawn) from Old Irish ron "seal" + dim. suffix -an; or "a pledge". Ten saints, including Ronan of Lough Derg and Ronan of Lismore had this name. Ronan.
  • Shane — (SHAYN)(H) "gracious gift of god, god is gracious".
  • Dubhdara — (doov-DAW-ra) from Old Irish dub "dark" + dara "oak" = "dark man of the oak".
  • Culley — possibly "woods".
  • Scrymgeour — "fighter".
  • Steafán — (STEF-ahn)(Gr) "crowned with laurel". Stephen, Stiofan.
  • Mil — name of Dugum's son in old tales.
  • Gwydre — name of one of Arthur's sons in old legends.
  • Leachlainn — (LEKH-len) "servant of St. Secundinus". Laughlin, Lochlainn, Lanty.
  • Keller — from a word meaning "little companion".
  • Erin — (EHR-in)(Gael) "peace". An alternate name for Ireland, from the goddess Eriu. Eryn.
  • Mata — Scottish form of Matthew.
  • Auliffe — (AW-lif) Irish anglicized form of Amhlaoibh.
  • Irish: Dark-haired
  • Neal — (Celt) "champion". Neil, Neill, Neale, Nealon.
  • Reilly — "valiant". Riley.
  • Rhuvawn — name of Deorthach's son in legends.
  • Roibhilín -(ROH-ve-lin) "shining fame"; Old Irish name, dim. of Robert and Irish version of Robin. Roibin, Roibeard, Ravelin, Ravelyn, Revelin.
  • Sinnoch — name of one of Seithved's sons in tales.
  • Greer — from a Scottish surname, a contraction of the name Gregor.
  • JODOCUS m Dutch (Archaic), Ancient Celtic (Latinized) Latinized form of Judoc (see JOYCE).
  • Doran — "stranger" or "exile". Deoradhain.
  • Diancecht — (DI-an-ket) the great physician of the Tuatha De Danann; father of Miach, Cian, Cethe, and Cu, daughter Airmid. Dian Cecht.

  • Nyle — (Celt) "champion".
  • Kennedy — from Old Irish name Cennetig: cenn "head" + etig "ugly"; ; or "helmeted chief"; mostly associated with Ireland, it has been used consistently in Scotland as a family name and first name since the 12th C.
  • Erc — (EHRK) possibly "battle boar". Earc.
  • Cú Uladh — (koo-ULL-uh) "hound of Ulster". Cooley, Cullo, Cooey, Covey.
  • Trevedic — (tre-VED-ik) from a Cornish word meaning "country dweller".
  • Thady — (Aramaic) "praise"; Irish version of Thaddeus.
  • Peredur — (per-ED-eer) Derivation uncertain, perhaps from Welsh peri "spears" + dur "hard". Peredur mab Efrawc was the hero of a Welsh Arthurian grail romance.
  • Barra — (Celt) "good marksman". Bearach (BAHR-akh), Bearchan, Barry.
  • Medyr — legendary name of Medyredydd's son.
  • Cathal — (KOH-hal, KA-hal or KOH-al) "strong in battle, battle-mighty". from Old Irish cath "battle". Popular in the Middle Ages. Cathal Crobderg (Red-Handed Cathal) was a king of Connacht in the 13th C. Traditonal in the MacManus, Maguire and MacDonagh families. Cahal (KA-hal).
  • Tarlach — (TAHR-lak) "abettor" or "instigator". From Old Irish Tairdelbach, prob. meaning "one who assists or aids". Popular during Middle Ages. Two kings: Tairdelbach, King of Munster, and Tairdelbach O'Connor, King of Ireland. Tairdelbach, Toirdhealbhach, Turlough..
  • Lulach — (LOO-luhx) An old Scottish royal name, meaning "little calf" in Gaelic, borne by the stepson of Macbeth, who lived in the 11th C.
  • Caolán — (KWEE-lahn) "slender". Kealan, Kelan.
  • Morven — from a Gaelic word meaning "mariner". Morvin.
  • Calder — "brook or stream".
  • Comán — (KOH-mahn) "bent".
  • Dylan — (DIL-un or DUHL-an) Welsh word for "ocean, sea, the deep". In Mabinogi, Dylan eil Ton (Sea Like a Wave) was a son of Arianrhod. Welsh-born 20th C. poet Dylan Thomas was one of the finest English language poets. Dillan, Dillon.
  • Mackenzie — "son of Kenzie". Mckenzie, McKenzie, MacKenzie.
  • Marrock — a knight who was secretly a werewolf.
  • Goraidh — from a Celtic word for "peaceful".
  • Dubhán — (DUH-ven, or DUH-wen) "dark, black". Dowan, Duggan, Duane, Dwayne, Dubhagain.
  • GENOVEFA f Ancient Celtic Gaulish form of GENEVIÈVE
  • Cormac — (KAWR-mak) from corbaid "defile" + mac "son"; or "charioteer". Cormac mac Airt was a legendary high king of Ireland, ancestor of the O'Neills. Also the name of many kings, bishops and saints.
  • Giolla Bhríghde — (GIL-a BREED) from words meaning "servant of St. Brighid" or "Saint Brigid". Gillbride.
  • Naw — name of Seithved's son in legends.
  • Tarrant — variant of Taranis, a thunder and storm god, similar to Jupiter. Tarran, Taryn, Taren, Terrant.
  • Gorsedd — "from the mound".
  • Maruna — (mah-ROO-nuh) from Old Irish ma "my" + the name Ronan.
  • Bogart — "bof" or "marshland"; a name in both Ireland and Wales.
  • Giolla Chríost — (GIL-a KREEST) "servant of Christ". See Gilchrist.
  • Mark — Marc.
  • Cosgrove — (koz-grohv) derived from a word meaning "victor" or "champion".
  • Trent — "dwells near the rapid stream". Trynt.
  • Caradawg — name of Eudav's father in old tales.
  • Price — "son of Rhys" and "son of the ardent one".
  • Hen Wyneb — "old face".
  • Daibhéid — (DEH-vid or da-VEECH)(H) "beloved". Daighi, David, Daibhead (same pronun.)
  • Rhett — "enthusiastic".
  • Dremidydd — the father of Drem in old tales.
  • Gillis — Gaelic Gille Iosa (gil-yuh EE-uh-suh) "servant of Jesus"; traditional first name in the Hebrides.
  • Keegan — (Gael) "little and fiery". Keagen, Kegan.
  • Derry — (Gael) "red-headed"; "great lover", "an ancient hero". Also a city in Northern Ireland.
  • Blathaon — legendary name of the son of Mwrheth.
  • Custenhin — legendary name of Erbin's father.
  • Goibniu — god of blacksmiths known in Ireland and Wales, he forged all weapons for the Tuatha De Danann, they never missed their mark and the wounds inflicted were always fatal.
  • Niels — "champion"; from Niall. Neil.
  • Colwyn — name of a Welsh river.
  • Macaulay — "son of righteousness"; from a surname derived fr. the first name Aulay "son of Aulay".
  • Nynnyaw — legendary name of one of Beli's sons.
  • Renfrew — "dwells near the still river" or "raven wood". Rhinfrew.
  • Eamon — (EH-mon or AY-mon) "wealthy guardian". Irish version of Anglo-Saxon name Edmund. American Eamon de Valera (1882-1975) served as both president and prime minister of the Irish Republic. Aimon, Eamonn.
  • Meryasek — (mer-YAZ-ek) Name of an important early Breton saint, also known as Meriadek or Meriadoc, who was the subject of a medieval drama Bewnans Meryasek, one of the few remaining pieces of early literature in the Cornish language.
  • Selyv — name of Kynan's son in old legends.
  • Gwynek — (GWIN-ek) Cornish for "little fair one". Name of an 8th C. saint associated with the parish of Saint Winnoc.
  • Nab — from a Gaelic word for "abbot".
  • Luthias — "famous warrior".
  • Dagda — a god called the Good God. Daghda.
  • Ruairi — (ROO-e-ree) from Old Irish name Ruaidri: ruad "red" + re "king". Ruaidre Ua Conchobair, last high king of Ireland died in 1170. Ruaidhri, Rory.
  • Chullain — (KUHL-in) a mythic name coming from Cu Chullain.
  • Morfessa — a master of great wisdom who lived in Falias, one of the cities the Tuatha De Danann came from. He gave the Tuatha the Stone of Fal, the inauguration stone for making a king.
  • CARA Celtic: Friend
  • Nolan — (NOH-luhn)(Gael) "famous" or "noble". Noland, Nolin.
  • Irish: Little seal
  • Mordwywr — "sailor".
  • Beartlaidh — (BEHRT-lee)(Aramaic) "ploughman". Bartley.
  • CARATACUS m Ancient Celtic (Latinized) Latinized form of CARATACOS
  • Iolo — (YOH-loh) Nickname for Iowerth. Iolo Morganwg (Iolo or Glamorgan) was the bardic name of Edward Williams (1747-1826), stonemason, poet, scholar, and initiator of the National Eisteddfod.
  • Alick — Scottish variant of Alec, which has gained popularity on it own. The form Ellic is in use in the Highlands. Gaelic form is Ailig.
  • Allister — (Gr) "defender of mankind". Alastar, Alistair, etc.

  • Mostyn — "fortress in a field".
  • Conary — (KOH-ner-ee) ancient Irish name. Conaire.
  • Caley — (KAY-lee) "slender"; alternate Irish form of Caleb.
  • Dallas — Scots-Gaelic for "from the waterfall"; name of a town in Scotland and used as a personal name. Dallieass, Dallis, Dalys.
  • Leary — variant of Laoire and Laegaire.
  • Devin — (Celt) "a poet". Dev, Devon.
  • Kado — (KAH-doh) from Welsh cad "battle". Breton form of the name of early Welsh saint, Cadoc. Kadeg, Kadec (KAH-dek).
  • Art — (ART) from Old Irish art "bear". Ancient Irish name, not a nickname for English Arthur (but both derive from a common Indo-European bear word arth). In legend, Art Oenfer (Art the Lonely) was a high king of Ireland and father of Cormac mac Airt. A later, historical Art, Art McMurrough, was a medieval king of Leinster who fought the English. Both Irish and Scottish, now as an informal shortening of Arthur. Artagan.
  • Zephan — (ZEF-ahn) listed as a name of an Irish saint.
  • Aulay — from Norse Olaf. Source of surname (and first name) MacAulay; Scottish anglicized form of Amhla(i)dh. See Amhlaoibh.
  • Bleiddian (BLATH-yahn): blaidd "wolf" + -ian, verbal ending, "one who goes wolfing, i.e. looting, raiding".
  • Cystennin — from the word "constant".
  • Nadelek — (nah-DEL-ek) Cornish word for Christmas.
  • Bress — son of Elathan of the Fomors who married the goddess Brighid. The Fomors were a sea-dwelling race who opposed the Tuatha De Danann over Ireland and lost.
  • Uaine — (OON-yuh) old Irish name, form of Owen; "young warrior". Owain, Owen, Oney, Owney, Hewney.
  • Loegaire — (LOH-geer?) Cu Chulainn's charioteer who went to Mag Mell with him to rescue its queen from abductors; another tale says he died from a spear meant for the hero.
  • Waljan — "chosen".
  • Nissyen — (NESS-yen) "lover of peace"; brother of Evnissyen and his total opposite in morals and temperament. He was also a half-brother to the god Bran.
  • Cu Chulainn — (KOO KUHL-in) Name of the hero of the early Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley. Cu Chulainn's birth name was Setanta, and was given his adult name after he killed a watch dog of the smith, Culann. He then assumed the dog's place and duties and was renamed Cu Chulainn "hound of Culann". Other early names that begin with cu are Cu Maige (Hound of the Plain); Cu Mara (Hound of the Sea); and Cu Coigriche (Hound of the Border). Cu was a common title of Celtic chieftains.
  • BRYANT Celtic: Popular variant of Brian
  • Lyall — "loyal".
  • Roparzh — (ROH-pers) Breton form of Robert. St. Roparz of Arbrissel (1045-1116) was named bishop of Rennes, but chose to live as a hermit.
  • Raegan — (ray-gehn) "little king" or "royal". Reagan, Reegen, Regan.
  • Adie — Scottish pet form of Adam, and less commonly Aidan. Adaidh is the Gaelic spelling of Adie, hence surname MacAdaidh, Anglicized McCadie..
  • Ranald — from Gaelic Raghnall (RUHLL), from Norse name Rognvaldr "power, might". A traditional name among the men of the MacDonald clan. Ronald.
  • Padern — (PAH-dern) from Latin paternus "father". Name of an early Cornish chieftain.
  • Carey — "from the castle". Cary, Caerau.
  • Pony — "small horse".
  • Amlawdd — name of the father of Goleuddydd in Welsh tales.
  • Keith — "wood-dweller" or "dwells in the woods". Keath, Keithon.
  • Milyan — (MIL-yahn) Prob. from Latin aemilianus "flattering". Name found in the Bodmin Manumissions*. Also a legendary king of Cornwall and an early saint.
  • Crist — from the word "Christian".
  • Carroll — (Gael) "champion". Carly, Carolus, Cairell(?).
  • Padrig — (PAH-dreek) Breton form of the Irish name Padraig (Patrick). St. Patrick.
  • Fychan — "small".
  • Andreas — Welsh form of Andrew. Andras.
  • Pelles — known as the Wounded King of the Grail Castle after he was wounded through both thighs; his daughter Elaine bore Galahad, Lancelot's son.
  • Beacán — (BE-kawn or BA-kawn) from Old Irish bec "little, small" + dim. -an. St. Becan founded a monastery in Westmeath in the 6th C. Becan.
  • Gilmartyn — (gil-MAHR-tuhn) "servant of Saint Martin".
  • Manius — form of Norse-Viking Magnus, meaning "great". Manus.
  • Bryson — from a surname meaning "son of Bryce".
  • Kavan — "handsome". Kavenaugh.
  • Dougal — Gaelic Dubhghlas (DOO-luhs) Fr. Old Irish dubh "dark" + glas "green or blue". Common Celtic river name surviving as the rivers Douglas in Ireland and Scotland, Dulas in Wales, and Dawlish, Dowles and Divelish in England. Douglas, Dugall, Doughald, Dougald (DOO-gald), Dùghall (DOO-ull), Dùghlas (DOOG-lass).
  • Drummond — (Celt) "unclear".
  • Digby — "a town with a ditch or dike".
  • Galahad — illegitimate son of Lancelot and Elaine; a pure knight who surpassed his father's deeds of valor and died when he saw the Holy Grail.
  • Baird — from a clan name, derived fr. Old Irish bard "a bard, poet". Bard.
  • Desmond — (DEZ-mond) "man of the world"; from a surname based on an old name for the territory of South Munster. Demond.
  • Kynan — "chief".
  • Gilchrist — "servant of Christ". Ghilchrist, Giolla Chriost, Gilvarry, Gil, Gilley.
  • Colin — (KAW-lin)(Gael) "child"; "victory of the people"; or "young cub". Cailean, Colan, Collin, Coll.
  • Chalmers — "son of the lord". Clamer, Chalmer.
  • Siencyn — Welsh version of Jenkin, "god is gracious".
  • Devine — "ox". Daimhin.
  • DRUSTAN m Ancient Celtic Older form of TRISTAN... 
  • Maelcoluim — from Old Irish mael "devotee" + Colm, fr. Latin columba "dove"; or "servant of St. Columba". Colm Cille was the Irish name of the most important early St. in Scotland, known also by the Latin name Columba, who founded the monastery on Iona, and converted the Pictish kings of Scotland; three medieval kings of the Scots bore the name Malcolm. Malcolm.
  • Fitzroy — "son of Roy".
  • Corey — (kohr-ee) "raven", "from the hollow" or "helmet". Cori, Cory.
  • Perth — "thornbush" or "thicket".
  • Calhoun — (KAHL-hoon) "warrior" or "narrow woods". Coillcumhann, Colquhoun.
  • Midir — (MY-tir) a fairy king and another god of the Underworld, connected with the Isle of Falga (Isle of Man) where he had his palace. Midhir.
  • Cawley — from the Gaelic word for "relic". Camhlaidh, Cauley.
  • Roibeárd — (ROH-bahrd)(Teut) "of shining fame". Robert, Roibart.
  • Caswyn — (KAZ-win) from Celtic cad "battle" + gwen "shining, holy".
  • Ronat — (ROH-naht) "seal".
  • Goreu — legendary name of one of the sons of Custinhin (or Custennin) and an unnamed woman who was Igraine's sister.
  • Gilandrew — (gil-AHN-droo) from Old Irish gilla "servant, devotee" + Andrew "of Saint Andrew".
  • Konan — (KOHN-ahn) from Celtic kuno "high, mighty". 7th C. St. Konan. Conan.
  • Casswallawn — according to legends, the name of the son of Beli.
  • Ear — derived from the Gaelic meaning "from the east".
  • Bleidd — (BLAYTH) "wolf".
  • Joseph — (H) "god will add".
  • Lomán — (LO-man) from the word lomm "bare". Lomman.

  • Govynyon — a name from old legends.
  • Fflergant — legendary naem of one of Brittany's kings.
  • Cinaed - "handsome". Irish form of Kenneth. Kennet.
  • Evnissyen — (ev-NESS-yen) "lover of strife". Half-brother of god Bran in ancient legends.
  • Conaire — (KAW-ni-re) Ancient Irish name, poss. from cu (con) "wolf, hound" + aire "farmer, landowner". Conor, Conroy, Conlan ("hero").
  • Marzhin — (MARH-zeen) Breton form of Martin.
  • Iestyn — Welsh version of Justin, "one who is just".
  • Cairpre — (KAIR-pre) the legendary Cairpre was the chief bard of the Tuatha De Danann and son of the god Ogma. Cairpre Liffechair wiped out the Fianna at the battle of Gabhra where he killed Fionn's grandson.
  • Jos — (ZHOS) from Old Breton iud "lord, chief".
  • Úistean — (OOSH-tchen, or ISH-tchen)(Teut) "intelligence". Euston, Hugh.
  • Seleven — (ze-LEV-en) An early Cornish saint.
  • JUDOCUS m Dutch (Archaic), Ancient Celtic (Latinized) Latinized form of Judoc (see JOYCE).
  • Monroe — (mun-roh) name derived from the mouth of Ireland's Roe River; or "from the red swamp".
  • Armstrong — Scottish, transferred use of the surname, probably as a nickname for a man with strong arms.
  • Albion — (AL-be-on)(Celt) "mountain".
  • Cubert — lengendary name of the son of Daere.
  • Amren — name of the son of Bedwyr in Welsh Arthurian sagas.
  • Conchobhar — (KON-kho-var or KROO-ar) derived from cu "hound, wolf" + cobar "desiring" = "wolf-lover" or "lover of hounds"; "high will, desire". Conchobhar, Conor, Connor, Conny, Cornelius.
  • Fercetrniu — poet of King Cu Roi, whose wife caused the king's death; when the poet discovered this, he leaped over a cliff taking her with him to her death.
  • Bellieus — a Knight of the Round Table who fought Lancelot over an incident with his wife.
  • Ambrós — Irish Gaelic form of English Ambrose, from Greek Ambrosios "immortal". The surname MacAmbrois is anglicized as McCambridge.
  • Mawrth — Welsh version of Mars, a Roman god of war.
  • Anir — listed as a son of King Arthur in the sagas; vaguely hinted in the stories that he was killed by Arthur and buried in Wales at Licat Amir. Amr.
  • Llywelyn — (lhu-WEL-en) from Welsh llwy "leader, steerer" + eilun "image". Nicknames Llelo (LHE-loh) and Llew (LHE-oo), which is also Welsh for "lion". Llewellyn.
  • Cairns — Gaelic place word that became a surname and first name. Traditionally, a cairn is a heap of stones placed on top of a grave.
  • Cass — (KAHS) from Old Irish cas "curly". Popular name in early Ireland. Name of a legendary ancestor of the O'Briens, MacNamaras and O'Gradys.
  • Blackburn — "black brook".
  • Heulfryn — (HIIL-vrin) heul "sun" + bryn "hill".
  • Kearney — (keer-nee)(Celt) "warrior". Carney.
  • Ervin — (Gael) "beautiful".
  • Cameron — (Celt) from cam + shron "nose", or brun "hill". An important clan name, place name in the old kingdom of Fife. Camar, Camshron, Camero, Camey.
  • Peddyr — (PETH-uhr) Manx form of Peter.
  • Dalldav — son of Cunyn Cov in old legends.
  • Awstin — from the Welsh word for "august"; also a version of Austin, a contracted form of the Latin Augustinus.
  • Llwyr — legendary nae of the Llwyryon's son.
  • Abhainn — "river." Aibne.
  • Heremon — form of Irving; "handsome and fair".
  • Derrien — (DAY-ryen) Early Breton saint. St. Derrien performed miracles and saved a nobleman's son (the future St. Riok) from a dragon after a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Darien.
  • Arawn — (AR-awn) in mythology, the god of Annwn (an-OON), the Underworld, but not associated with terror or eternal punishment. It later became the underground kingdom of the dead.
  • Finghin — (FIN-jin) "fair birth"; variant of Fionn, Fionnbarr. Fineen, Finnin, Fionan, Finian, Finbar.
  • Kelli — "from the wood".
  • Ibor — (EE-bohr?) from iobar "yew tree". St. Ibor opposed St. Patrick because he was a "foreigner". Iobhar.
  • Pawl — (POWL) Welsh form of Paul, "little".
  • Meurig — "dark skinned"; Welsh version of Morris or Maurice.
  • Don — "brown stranger"; form of Donald; Irish lord of the Underworld or Land of the Dead.
  • TEUTORIGOS m Ancient Celtic Older form of TUDOR (1)
  • Ailbeart — "noble"; Scots-Gaelic form of Albert. Ailbert.
  • Cadwr — name of the son of Gwryon in old tales.
  • Irish: Good
  • Penvro — "from Pembroke".
  • Irvin — "white river". Irv, Inek, Irving.
  • Per — (PER) Breton form of Pierre.
  • Thomase — (taw-MAHS) Manx form of Thomas; nickname Thomlyn (TAWM-lin).
  • Tomey — (TA-mahs) Irish form of Thomas. Tomas.
  • Kendrew — Scottish form of Andrew.
  • Garbhán — (GAHR-van) from garb "rough". Garban, Garvan.
  • Connor — (KAW-nor) from Old Irish Conchobar: cu (con) "hound, wolf" + cobar "desiring"'; "wolf-lover". In Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley, Conchobar mac Nessa was king of Ulster. Modern Irish form Conor, Conchobhar (KROO-ar).
  • Arzhel — (AHR-zel) from British artos "bear" + maglos "chief". St. Arzhel was born in Wales in 482, founded a monastery in the Forest of Broceliande in Brittany. Famed as a magician, Arzhel was summoned to King Childebert's court in Paris. After his death, Arzhel's name was invoked to end droughts.
  • Sierra — "black".
  • Ffowc — "of all the people".
  • Doolish — (DOO-lish) Manx form of Douglas, from Old Irish dub "dark, black" + glas "green or blue".
  • BRIANNA Brianna is a super popular girls name, so it's a good thing that it comes equipped with a variety of nicknames ranging from...
  • Barclay — Scottish, Irish; transferred use of the Scottish surname, which was taken to Scotland in the 12th C. by Walter de Berchelai, who became a chamberlain of Scotland in 1165. Probably derived from Berkeley in Gloucestershire, which is from OE beorc "birch tree" + leah "wood or clearing"; "birch tree meadow". In Ireland, its been anglicized in the form of Parthalán. Berkeley.
  • Riddock — "smooth field". Reidhachadh, Riddoc.
  • Dilwyn — "shady place". Dillwyn.
  • Albany — from Fionn, from find "white, fair"; anglicized as Albany from Latin albus "white".
  • Maelduine — (MAL-doon? or MAL-doo-een?) his mother was a nun who was raped by his father, Ailill. He made a skin boat and sailed among the Blessed Islands in search of his father's murderers.
  • Malvin — Irish form of Melvin. Malvyn.
  • Kaourantin — (kaoh-RAHN-teen) Name of a 5th C. saint who was bishop of Quimper. French spelling Corentin (koh-REN-teen). Tin (TEEN), Tinic, Tinig (TEEN-eek), Kaour (KAOHR), Kao (KAOH).
  • Diarmad — (DYEER-muht) from Old Irish Diarmait, "sorrow". Early Irish literature, Scottish and Irish ballads and folktales, Diarmaid was a member of the warrior band of Finn mac Cumaill. Diarmaid had a love spot on his face that made women fall instantly in love with him. Clan Campbell traces its ancestry to one Diarmid O'Duibne. Dermot.

  • Hywel — (HUH-wel) from Welsh hywel "eminent". Hywel Dda (Hywell the Good) was a 10th C. king of Wales. Made the druids' oral legal tradition into a written code of law. Anglicized Howell.
  • AVALON Celtic: Celtic for island of the apples, Avalon is the magical island where the old and the new religions of England meet and overlap...
  • Manawydan — name of sea god Llyr's son; equal to Irish god Manannan mac Lir. He was a skilled shapeshifter and keppt the Isle of Man and the Isle of Arran under his protection; and broke the enchantment on Dyfed.
  • Alby — (al-bee) anglicized from of Ailbhe.
  • Yale — "fertile upland".
  • Emlyn — (EM-lin) from Latin aemilianus "flattering, charming"; some sources say "waterfall".
  • Oran — (OH-ruhn) from Old Irish name Odran "otter". St. Odran was the charioteer for St. Patrick.
  • Clyde — "loud voiced", "heard from afar", or "warm". Clywd.
  • Dillon — (Gael) "faithul" or "faithful".
  • Morvan — (MOHR-vahn) from Old Breton mor "sea". Name of a 9th C. Breton king.
  • Artair — (AHR-shtuhr) "eagle-like" or "high, noble"; Gaelic form of Arthur, fr. Celtic artos "bear", or poss. borrowed from Latin Artorius; and the surname MacArtair is derived, and anglicized as McArthur and Carter. Arth, Artus.
  • Laisrean — from laisre "flame". Laisren.
  • Patrick — (L) "noble". Pat, Patty.
  • Ennis — (Gael) "sole or only choice".
  • Ruairidh — (RO-urree) Scottish form of Teutonic name Roderick, "famous ruler". Ruairdh (same pronun.).
  • Genty — from a word meaning "snow".
  • Dallas — (Gael) "wise". Dall.
  • Gwalchmei — "Hawk of May" or "hawk of the battle". Legendary name of Gwyar's son. Gavan, Gaven, Gavin.
  • Grant — (L) "great".
  • Adhamh — Scots-Gaelic spelling of Adam, "of the earth".
  • Huw — (HYOO) Welsh version of Hugh, from Old German hugi "intelligence, spirit". Hew, Hewe, Hu.
  • Gillespie — Gaelic Gilleasbuig (gil-yuh-IS-pik) "servant of a bishop"; traditional first name among the Campbells.
  • Ainsley — (Gael) "my very own meadow or lee".
  • Banning — "blond child".
  • Cymry — (KUM-ree) "from Wales"; the Welsh people's name for themselves.
  • Gareth — (GAHR-eth) from Welsh gwaraidd "civilized, gentle"; other sources have the meaning "powerful with the spear" from an Anglo-Saxon word. Tennyson used the name for a knight of King Arthur's in his Idylls of the King.
  • Somhairle — Irish version of Old Norse-Viking name meaning "summer-farer" or "summer wanderer". Sumerled, Summerled, Sommerly, Somerly.
  • Suibhne — (SHEEV-ne) from Old Irish Suibne, of several early saints and kings. King Suibne Gelt (Mad Sweeney) went insane at the battle of Mag Rath in 637 as a result of a curse put upon him by a saint he had insulted. Spent the rest of his life living in trees and composing nature poetry. Sweeney.
  • VERCINGETORIX m Ancient Celtic Means "king over warriors" from Gaulish ver "on, over" combined with cingeto "marching men, warriors" and rix "king"... 
  • Colum — (KAW-luhm) from name of the Irish saint, Colum Cille, derived from Latin columba "a dove" + Old Irish cille "church".
  • Semias — master of wisdom from Murias, one of the four cities the Tuatha De Danann came from; he gave his cauldron Undry to the Dagda.
  • Pawly — (PAWL-ee) Cornish form of Paul.
  • Brogan — St. Brogan was scribe to St. Patrick during his meeting with the Fianna. Broccan.
  • Connacht — (kon-nocked or kon-naht) from the Irish County of the same name and spelling.
  • Egan — (EE-gan)(Celt) "ardent or fiery". Aodhagán (EH-uh-gahn), Egon, Eagon, Eoghan, Eogan.
  • Oran — (OHR-an) from odran, Old Irish word for "otter". St. Odran is patron of Waterford.
  • Cowan — (kow-an) possibly "hillside hollow".
  • Nicca — (NIK-uh) Cornish nickname for Nicholas.
  • Declan — (DEK-lawn) Name of a 6th C. saint who founded the monastery Ardmore in County Waterford. Déahglán (DEK-lan).
  • Adrian — "of the Adriatic"; from original form Latin Hadrianus. Aidrian.
  • Wilmot — (WIL-muht) Manx form of William.
  • Gofannon — on of the goddess Donn's sons. He was a god of blacksmiths and the equal of the Irish Goibniu.
  • Tomás — (TA-mahs)(H) "twin". Thomas.
  • Deargh — from a Gaelic word for "red".
  • Drudwas — name of Tryffin's son in old tales.
  • Costentyn — (kahs-TEN-tin) Cornish form of Constantine. St. Costentyn was a Cornish king who gave up his throne to become a monk. Popular until 18th C.
  • Evrei — name out of old stories.
  • Oistin — (OHS-teen)(L) "venerable". Austin.
  • Cian — (KEE-an) possibly from Welsh ci (cwn) "hound, wolf", or from Old Irish cian "ancient, enduring". Cian is known as on of the five Cynfeirdd, founding poets of Welsh tradition, although none of his poems have survived.
  • Glenville — "village in the glen".
  • Owein — (OH-wayn) from Latin name Eugenius (Eugene) "well- or noble-born"; some sources list it as "young warrior". Owain, Owen.
  • Dunmore — "fortress on the hill".
  • March — (MAHRX) from Welsh march "horse". Name of King Mark in the Welsh version of the Tristan saga, in which he is known as March ap Meirchion (Horse, Son of Horses). The horse was a symbol of kingship in Celtic culture. Mark, Marc.
  • Scottish: Field of battle
  • Griffith — (GRIF-ith) from Welsh cryf "strong" + udd "lord"; possibly also "red-haired". Gruffudd, Gruffydd.
  • Cnychwr — name of the son of Nes in old tales.
  • Kendrick — from a word meaning "son of Henry"; or "royal chieftain".
  • Clud — "lame".
  • Gilvarry — (gil-very or gil-var-ee) "servant of St. Barry". Giolla Bhearaigh (GIL-a VER-ee).
  • Bleddyn — (BLETH-in) from Welsh blaidd "wolf" + dim. suffix -yn. Related Welsh wolf names: Bledri (BLED-ree): blaidd + rhi "king". The slang name Wolf was applied to both warriors and outlaws in Wales.
  • Carantoc — (ka-RAN-tahk) from Cornish carant "love". Name of an early saint revered in Cornwall, Brittany and Wales.
  • Aonghus — (AYNG-ghus) from Old Irish oen "one" + gus "vigor". In Irish myth, Oengus was a god of youth and love, the son of the goddess Boand and god Dagda Oengus Tirech was the name of a legendary hero, said to be the ancestor of the O'Briens an MacNamaras. Five saints, including Oengus Ceile De bore this name. Angus.
  • Galbraith — (gahl-brayth) Old Irish meaning "Scotsman".
  • Malo — (MAH-loh) from Old Breton mach "hostage" + lon "shining". One of the most important early Breton saints, patron of St. Malo.
  • Uilleam — (OOL-yam or OOL-yuhm) "resolute soldier"; Gaelic form of William, brought to Scotland in the Middle Ages by Norman French companions of William the Conquerer. Liam is the Irish form of the name and popular in Scotland also.
  • Adamnan — "the timid one" or "little Adam"; name of an abbot of Iona. Awnan, Adomnan, Adhamhan.
  • Alun — Welsh; possibly cognate of Alan. Also a river name in Wales spelled Alyn.
  • Delano — (deh-LAH-no)(Gael) "dark" or "a healthy black man".
  • Gralon — (GRAH-lohn) from Old Breton grad "rank" + lon "full". Legendary king of Brittany, hero of the doomed city of Ker-Is, which sank into the Bay of Douarnenez for the wickedness of its people. Gralon escaped with the help of Saint Gwenole.
  • Arlen — "pledge".
  • Nuada — (NOO-ah-dah) a god known in both Ireland and Wales; he lost his hand in battle and had to step down as king of the Tuatha De Danann, since they demanded that a king be perfect. He wore a flexible silver hand made by Dian Cecht, until Miach and Airmid replaced the physical hand by magic.
  • Iowerth — (YOH-wayrth) from Norse ior "lord" + Welsh gwerth "value, worth". Used as the Welsh version of Edward since the Middle Ages.
  • Brastias — originally a knight in Cornwall, he was one of Arthur's captains, and later Warden of the North.
  • SLUAGHADHÁN m Ancient Irish Derived from Irish sluaghadh "raid" and a diminutive suffix.
  • Seán — (SHAWN) "god's gracious gift"; Irish form of John, der. from Norman French name Jehan. Shaun, Shane, Sion, Shawn, Seaghan (SEE-a-gun).
  • Dànaidh — Danny.
  • Govannon — son of the goddess Donn in old legends; he was a smith-god.
  • Lailoken — name of a Scottish prophet who was driven partially mad by his gift; some author's claim Merlin's story was based on his life.
  • Sugyn — legendary name of Sugynedydd's son.
  • Goronwy — (gohr-ON-wee) from Welsh gwr "man". Goronwy Owen (1723-1769) was an 18th C. Welsh language renaissance poet; emigrated to the colonies and died in Virginia. Also Goronw (gohr-ON-oo); Gronw (GROHN-oo).
  • Urquhart — Scottish form of Old English name meaning "from the fount on the knoll".
  • Kerry — (Gael) "manly", "dark hair" or "son of the black one". Form of Carol(l). Keary.
  • English: Son of Maddock
  • Tanet — (TAH-net) Old Breton name meaning "afire".
  • Iarfhlaith — (YAR-lath) Irish saint name; St. Iarlaith was born in Tuam and ordained in 468 and built the first monastery and school at Cloonfush. Iarlaith, Iarlaithe, Jarlath.
  • Culann — variant of Cu Chulainn. Cu Chulainn served the chief Culann in payment for killing his dog. Culin.
  • Garym — a name from old stories.
  • Glythvyr — a name in ancient tales.
  • Cu Roi — (KOO REE/ROY?) name of a king of Munster, Cu Roi mac Daire; he had great Otherworld powers. Because his wife, Blanaid, loved Cu Chulainn, she helped kill Cu Roi.
  • Ainmire — (AHN-meer?) "great lord".
  • Tristan — from an Old Welsh word for "noisy one"; "clamor". Confused with Tristram; Tristan is mentioned as a Knight of the Round Table in the Arthurian sagas.
  • Treveur — (TRAY-vuhr) Name of an early prince and saint, son of St. Trifine. Treveur is the patron saint of Carhaix, Kergloff and Camlez.
  • Mártainn — (MAHRSH-teen or MAHR-shtan) "warlike"; Gaelic form of Martin.
  • Urmen — (OOR-muhn) from Old Irish name Eremon, the legendary leader of the Sons of Mil who went to Ireland to avenge his uncle Ith, who had been killed by the Tuatha De Danaan.
  • Rian — (REE-an) Dim. of Old Irish ri "king"; "little king". Old first name is the source of surname Ryan, since adopted as a first name in N. America. Ryan, Ryanne, Rhyan, Ryne, Riane, Rigan, Rigan (REE-gan).
  • Tigernach — from tigern "lord". Tighearnach, Tiarnach.
  • Cynan — (KUHN-ahn) from Celtic kuno "great, high". Popular in Medieval Wales.
  • Clesek — (KLEZ-ek) from British kluto "fame, renown".
  • Elatha — (AHL-a-hah) An old name meaning "art or craft".
  • Bram — (BRAHM) "raven". Irish form of Abraham. Abracham.
  • Fyrsil — version of Virgil, "bears the staff". Fferyll.
  • Ruaidhri — (RWE-e-ree)(Teut) "famous ruler"; from Teutonic Roderick. Rory, Roderick.
  • MORCANT m Ancient Celtic Old Welsh form of MORGAN (1)
  • Bréanainn — (BREH-neen)(Celt) "sword". Brendan, Breandán.
  • Kennan — "little Ken".
  • MAELEACHLAINN m Ancient Irish Variant of MÁEL SECHLAINN
  • Clach — from the Gaelic word for "stone".
  • Bryok, Breoc — (bree-OHK) from British name Brigacos, derived from Celtic root brig "high, mighty". Name of a 5th C. Welsh saint who was active in both Cornwall and Brittany.
  • Rafer — (ray-fer) from a word meaning "rich, prosperous". Raffer, Rafferty.
  • Arthur — (AHR-thuhr) from Celtic artos "bear", or possibly from the medieval Latin name Artorius. King Arthur, according to tradition, was born at Tintagel Castle on the coast of Cornwall.
  • Gilleabart — "pledge".
  • Cowel — (KOW-uhl) from Old Irish name Comgall. 6th C. Irish St. Comgall was the teacher of many great Irish missionary saints.
  • Morgan — "sea warrior" or "from the sea".
  • Mathghamhain — (ma-HOHN) Old Irish word for "bear" and popular in Middle Ages. Brother of High King Brian Boru. Mahon.
  • Ciaran — (KEER-an) from Old Irish ciar "dark" + dim. suffix -an. 6th C. St. Ciaran founded the monastery on Clonmacnoise. Kieran.
  • Doherty — "harmful".
  • Fflam — legedary name of the son of Nwyvre.
  • HAERVIU m Ancient Celtic Breton form of HARVEY
  • Gwyddno — (GWITH-noh) from Welsh gwyd "knowledge" + gno "fame".
  • Dyvyr — name of Alun's son in ancient stories.
  • Benesek — (be-NEZ-ek) from Latin name Benedictus. Found in the Bodmin Manumissions*.
  • Simon — "listener"; Hebrew name long used in Scotland. Associated with Clan Fraser. The chief of Clan Fraser of Lovat is called MacShimi "Son of Simon". Simeon, Symon; nicknames include Sim, Sym, Syme.
  • Cerdic — "beloved". Ceredig.
  • MÁEL SECHNAILL m Ancient Irish Means "disciple of Saint SEACHNALL" in Irish... 
  • Ronan — (ROH-nahn) from and Old Irish name meaning "little seal". St. Ronan, 6th C. Irish-born monk, founded a hermitage in the forest of Locronan in Brittany. Reunan (RUH-nahn).
  • Niall — (NEEL or NYEE-all) An Old Irish name, prob. derived from nel "cloud"; or "champion". Clan MacNeill traces its ancestry to Anrothan, an Irish prince who married a Scottish princess in the 11th C. Anrothan was descended from Irish high king, Niall Naighiallach (Niall of the Nine Hostages), who was claimed as ancestors also by the Irish O'Neill's.
  • Gwallter — Welsh version of Walter, "strong fighter".
  • Seoirse — (SYAHR-sha) "farmer"; form of George. Seorsa.
  • Coyle — (KOYL) derived from a word meaning "leader in battle".
  • Caoilte — (KWEEL-te) In legend, Cailte was a member of Finn mac Cumaill's warrior band. In medieval tale Colloquy of the Ancients, Cailte returned from the otherworld to tell St. Patrick stories of Finn and other heros of old pagan Ireland. Cailte.
  • Gilchrist — modern spelling of Gille Criosd, "servant of Christ".
  • Inek — Welsh version of Irvin.
  • Liam — (LEE-am) "resolute protector, unwavering protector". Irish form of William, short for Uilliam, derived from name Guillaume, introduced to Ireland by Anglo-Normans.
  • Tremain — (Celt) place name for stone house.
  • Niall — (NEE-AL)(Celt) "champion"; or Old Irish name poss. derived from nel "cloud". King Niall Noigiallach of Tara founded Ui Neill dynasty and ancestor to the O'Neills and Scotland's MacNeils. Neal, Neil, Neill, Nyle, Nealy, Niallán (NEE-a-lahn).
  • Trevor — "prudent". Trev, Treabhar.
  • Bain — (BAYN) short version of Bainbridge, "fair bridge".
  • Glen — (GLAYN) from Old Breton glenn "valley". Name of an early Breton saint.
  • Berth — name of the son of Cadwy in legends.
  • Clancy — "red-headed fighter".
  • Kynwyl — name of a very early Welsh saint.
  • Siarl — (SHARL) Welsh form of Charles, "manly".
  • Reese — "ardent one".
  • Pellyn — "from the lake's headland".
  • Gwawl — legendary name of Clud's son; at one time betrothed to the goddess Rhiannon before she married Pwyll.
  • Bainbridge — "fair bridge".
  • Eoin — (YOH-een) Manx form of John. Two early bishops of Man bore this name.
  • Ailein — from a Gaelic word for "from the green meadow".
  • Gwyneira — (gwin-AYR-ah) from Welsh gwyn "shining, holy" + eira "snow".
  • Mazhe — (MAY-zay) Breton form of Matthew.
  • Conan — (KOH-nuhn) from Celtic kuno "great, high". St. Conan of Man was the first bishop of sodor in the 7th C.
  • Dougal — (DOO-gahl) "dwells by the dark stream" or "dark stranger, from the dark water". Dubhghall (DOO-gal, or DOO-ahl), Dubgall, Douglas, Douglass, Duglas.
  • Wynn — "handsome", "fair, white one" or "light complexion". Wyn.
  • Gogyvwlch — a legendary name of unknown meaning.
  • Bartley — (Aramaic) "ploughman". Barclay, Berkley, Parthalan.
  • SUIBHNE m Irish, Scottish, Ancient Irish Means "well-going" in Gaelic... 
  • Craig — (KREG or KRAYG) "a steep rock", "crag" or "from near the crag". Craigen.
  • Glinyeu — name of Taran's son in legends.
  • Cleary — derived from a word meaning "learned".
  • Iddawg — name of Nynyo's son in old legends.
  • Macrea — from the Irish meaning "son of grace". Mccrea, Mccrae, McCrea, MacRea.
  • Brian — (BREE-an or BRI-an) Of uncertain derivation, poss. from Celtic brig "high, noble"; "the strong". In Irish myth, Brian was one of the three sons of the goddess Danu of the Tuatha De Danaan. High King Brian Boru ruled Ireland from 1002-1014 and defeated the Vikings at the battle of Clontarf. Brant, Brien, Bron, Bryon, Bryan, Bryant.
  • Ronson — "son of Ronald". Ronaldson.
  • Aedd — from the Irish aedh "fire"; also a name of a king of Ireland. Shortened form of Aeddan.
  • LUIGSECH f Ancient Irish Derived from the name of the Irish god LUGH.
  • Tremaine — "house of stone".
  • Dinadan — a Knight of the Round Table who had a sense of humor, and loved to play jokes on the other Knights. He was later killed by Mordred.
  • Gwennec — (GWAYN-ek) Dim. Old Breton word meaning "shining, holy". Patron saint of Plouhinec. Gwenneg.
  • Brady — "spirited". Bradaigh.
  • Brac — "free".
  • Brys — legendary name of the son of Brysthach.
  • Baddon — "one from Baddon".
  • Ailbhis — (AL-vis) 6th C. Irish saint; perhaps a form of Ailbhe. Anglecized as Elvis.

 

Celtic Names 1 ... Celtic Names 2... Celtic Names 3 .. Celtic Names 4

Japanese Names

Irish Names

Greek Names

Celtic Names

Italian Names

Last names

One Syllable Boy Names

Unusual Girls Names

Unusual Boy Names

Uncommon Baby Names

French Names

Middle names

Biblical Boy Names 

Biblical Girls Names

German Names

Welsh Names

African Names

Spanish Names

Scottish Names

Hebrew Names

Greek God Names

English Names


Find More