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Celtic Names

A service that offers a variety of boy & girl baby names, including Celtic boy & girl baby names with name, meaning, origin and gender.


 

Here are some Celtic names that we went over when we were naming our baby. We had a hard time but were happy when we found the perfect Celtic name.

  • Gwern — "old". The name of Branwen's son by Irish King Matholwch; the infant was thrown into a fire and killed by Branwen's half-brother Ennissyen.
  • Hagan — "youthful" or "young".
  • Eideard — (AE-jard) "wealthy guardian"; Gaelic form of Edward.

  • Jammes — (JAM-uhs) Cornish forms of James. Jamma (JAM-uh).
  • Mackinnley — "son of the learned ruler". Mckinnley, McKinnley, MacKinnley, McKinley, MacKinley, Mackinley, etc.
  • Parry — (PAHR-ee) from Welsh ap Harri "son of Harry or Henry".
  • Eoghan — (oh-GAHN or OHN) from Old Irish name Eogan "born of the yew tree": eo "yew" + gein "birth"; "god's gracious gift". Name of several early kings and saints. Eogan mac Damthacht was a celebrated Ulster hero. Earliest St. Eoghan was a 6th C. bishop of Tyrone, and uncle of St. Kevin. Eoin, Eogan, Egan.
  • Boyd — from Gaelic buidhe "yellow-haired".
  • Maddock — "generous".
  • Connlaoi — (kon-lee?) "chaste fire". Conley, Conleth, Connolly.
  • Helori — (hay-LOH-ree) Old Breton name derived from hael "generous".
  • Aedan — (EH-thahn) dim. form of Aed. St. Aodhan of Fern performed many miracles, including healing the lame and blind son of a British king.
  • Laird — "wealthy landowner".
  • Kea — (KAY) Prob. from Latin name Caius. Name of a 6th C. Cornish saint, and also King Arthur's right-hand man. According to early biography, St. Kea went to see Guinevere after King Arthur's death and persuaded her to become a nun.
  • Meriadec — (may-REEAH-dek) Name of a 7th C. saint and bishop of Vannes. Meriadeg, Meriadoc (may-REE-AH-dohk).
  • Adair — (Ah-dare) "from the ford by the oak trees". Adare.
  • Cai — (KAY) Usu. derived from Latin name Caius, poss. similar with Irish cai (coi) "path, way"; other sources say it means "rejoicer". Cai was described as King Arthur's closest companion. In the 10th C. poem, Pa gur yw y porthawr, Cai killed nine witches and rid the island of Anglesey of a fierce monster call the Palug Cat. Cei, Caius, Caw.
  • Moss — shortened form of Maurice or Morris.
  • Macsen — (MAK-sen) from Latin name Maximus. Maxen Wledig (Lord Maxen) was a 4th C. Spanish-born general who led the remnants of the Roman army out of Britain to claim the emperorship and was briefly successful. Maxen.
  • Uscias — master of wisdom who lived in Findias, one of the four cities the Tuatha De Danann came from. He gave Nuada the sword that killed all enemies.
  • Guy — "sensible".
  • Brett — (Celt) "native of Brittany". Britt.
  • BRIAN This Celtic name is widespread in Ireland, partially due to the renown of Brian Boru, a high king and great national hero...
  • Séafra — (SHEE-a-fra or SHE-fra) "god's peace"; Irish form of Jeffrey, brought by the Anglo-Normans. Sheary, Geoffrey, Seafraid, Seathrun.
  • Argyle — taken from the old placename Arregaithel, "from the land of the Gauls".
  • Charles — (OFr) "full-grown, manly". Teàrlach.
  • Murphy — (MUR-fee) "sea warrior". Murphey.
  • Banner — "flag bearer".
  • Meredith — (me-RED-ith) from mawr "great, big" + udd "lord"; other sources give the meaning "guardian from the sea". It was also the name of many medieval Welsh princes.
  • Eireamhon — (AY-ra-vohn) from Old Irish name Eremon. In legend, Eremon led the expedition of the Sons of Mil to Ireland to avenge his uncle Ith, who was slain by the Tuatha De Danaan; which would make Eremon the chief ancestor of the Irish people.

  • Kian — possibly Welsh version of Irish Cian, "ancient". Name of Lugh's father in old legends.
  • Kevern — (KEV-ern) 6th C. Cornish saint.
  • Alaois — (A-leesh)(Teut) "mighty battle". Aloys, Aloysius, Alabhaois.
  • Lloyd — "one with gray hair". Loy, Llwyd, Loyde.
  • Kacey — (kay-see) alternate spelling of Casey.
  • Naomhan — (NAU-ahn) "holy". Nevan.
  • Gowther — a hero in Arturian tales who tames his savage disposition by penances.
  • Conán — (KOH-nawn) from Celtic cuno "great, high"; "hound, wolf" or "wisdom"; "wisdom, intelligent". Of legend, Conan mac Morna was a member of Finn mac Cumaill's band. Six Irish saints also of this name. Conann, Conn.
  • Aodhan — (EH-dawn or AY-dawn) version of Old Irish Aedan, dim. of aed "fire". Aedan was the name of 21 early Irish saints. Popular name, often anglicized as Aidan (AY-dahn).
  • Tangi — (TAHN-gee) from Old Breton tan "fire" + ki "hound, wolf". Name of a 6th C. saint, the brother of St. Heodez. Tanguy.
  • Mannix — from a word meaning "monk". Mainchin (MAN-e-kheen).
  • Brasil — (Celt) "battle, brave, strong in conflict". Breasal, Basil, Brazil.
  • Keary — (keer-ee) "dark or dark-haired".
  • Taliesin — (tahl-YES-in) from Welsh tal "forehead, brow" + iesin "radiant, shining". A 6th C. poet who composed pems in praise of the heroes Owein, Urien Rheged and others.
  • CATHASACH m Ancient Irish Means "vigilant" in Irish.
  • Cynbal — "warrior chief". Cynbal.
  • Silyen — (SIL-yen) from British sul "sun" + genos "born". Patron saint of Laxulyan.
  • Carey — (Welsh) "stoney, rock island".
  • Brengy — (BREN-gee) from Cornish bren "noble" + gi "hound, wolf". A name found in the Bodmin Manumissions.*
  • Gronw Pebr — lover of Blodeuwedd, and rival of Llew.
  • Ifor — Welsh version of a Teutonic name meaning "archer".
  • Gandwy — a name in ancient legends.
  • Bairrfhionn — (BAR-fin)(Celt) "fair-haired" or "good marksman". Barrfind, Barram, Barre, Barra, Bairre, Barry.
  • English Origin
  • Timotheus — Welsh version of Timothy, "honors god".
  • Derek — (OGer) "people's ruler". Dirk, Derrick.
  • Moncreiffe — "from the hill of the sacred bough".
  • Kilydd — legendary name of Kelyddon's son.
  • Bartel — (Aramaic) "ploughman". Bartholomew.
  • Dolan — from a word meaning "dark-haired". Dolin, Dolyn.
  • Brice — "alert".
  • Gilroy — "devoted to the king". Gildray.
  • Dwayne — derived from "dark"; or "from the dunes". Duwain, Duane.
  • Braen — "corrupt".
  • Damh — "ox". Daimh.
  • Uileog — (IH-lig) dim. of Uilliam and Liam. Ulick.
  • Gwarthegydd — name of one of Caw's sons in old legends.
  • BRENDAN Celtic: Prince
  • Oengus — variant of Aonghus. Aengus.
  • Rhun — name of one of Beli's sons.
  • Melan — (MAY-lahn) 5th C. saint and bishop of Reenes. Melen, Melaine (MAY-len).
  • Duff — "dark". Dubh.
  • Yspadaden Pencawr — named as the father of Olwen in the story Culhwch and Ol.
  • Gaelic: Prince
  • Duncan — Gaelic Donnchadh (DOO-nuh-xuh) from Old Irish donn "brown" or "chief" + cath "warrior" = "dark-skinned warrior". Fr. a surname based on a clan name. Duncan was the name of two early Kings of the Scots: Duncan I in the 11th C. was immortalized by Shakespeare's MacBeth; Clan Donnchadh (the Robertsons) claims Donnchadh Reamhar (Duncan the Stout) as its name ancestor. Donnchadh, Donnachadh, Dunn, Dune.
  • Gwynn ap Nudd — began as a deity, Lord of the Underworld and leader of the Wild Hunt. He kidnapped Creiddylad, causing a battle with Gwythyr ap Greidawl, her betrothed. Later, he was known as King of the Fairies and the Plant Annwn, subterranean fairies. Medieval tales say the entrance to his kingdom is in Galstonbury Tor.

  • Penn — "from the peak".
  • Banning — "fair and small".
  • Alpin — Prob. derived from Latin albinus "white, fair". Borne by at least two Pictish kings, source of surname MacAlpin. Scottish anglicized form of Gaelic Ailpein, a name widely given in the Highlands from the time of earliest historical records. There is no obvious Gaelic etymology, and is often taken to be of Pictish origin. Alpine.
  • Antoine — (AN-ton)(L) "inestimable". Anntoin, Antoin.
  • Trefor — (TREV-ohr) from Welsh tref "home, town" + mor "great". Name used since the 10th C.
  • ALANNA Celtic: Fair
  • Lugh — (LOO) Name of a Celtic sun god, from lugu "light". Lugh is also known as the god Lleu in Welsh myth. Lughan (LOO-awn), Lughna (LOO-na).
  • Lavaine — in old Arthurian legend, he was a young Knight and son of Sir Bernard of Astolat. He was knighted by Lancelot and became one of the greatest Knights of the Round Table.
  • Earwine — "white river". Erwyn.
  • Ceallachan — (KAL-a-kawn) Meaning uncertain: may mean "someone who frequents churches" or "someone who is warlike". Name of a 10th C. king, and a saint. Anglicized as Callaghan.
  • Kane — (Gael) "tribute, warrior". Kayne, Kaine.
  • Benen — (BEH-non)(L) "blessed". Beineón (BEH-non), Bineán (BIN-ahn).
  • Ceri — (KER-ee) Name of two rivers, one in Dyfed and on in Glamorgan. May come from Welsh caru "to love"; male or female name.
  • Idris — "eager lord". Idriss, Idriys.
  • Jones — "son of John". Joenns.
  • Cant — "white".
  • NECHTAN m Irish Mythology, Ancient Celtic Celtic name of uncertain meaning, possibly meaning "damp" (cognate with NEPTUNE)... 
  • Jestin — Welsh version of Justin.
  • Tywysog — "prince".
  • Duff — (Celt) "dark-faced; black-faced".
  • Hugh — (HYOO) Widely used as an English version of Manx name Aedh. Huchon (HUH-chuhn), Hugen (HUH-guhn).
  • Miles — Several derivations, including Latin miles "soldier". From the 17th C. on, Miles was used to anglicize names beginning with mael "servant or devotee," such as Mael Muire. Myles.
  • Brandubh — (BRAWN-doov) from Old Irish bran "raven" + dubh "black". Name of a medieval king of Leinster and 2 saints.
  • Ap- — one of the prefixes used to denote "son of", as is "O" in Ireland and "Mac" in Ireland and Scotland.
  • Eoin — "young warrior"; form of Evan.
  • Gwitart — name of Aedd's son in ancient stories.
  • Gabhran — (GAHV-ruhn) Gaelic for "little goat"; an ancient Scottish name, borne by a grandson of Fergus mac Erc.
  • Kyndrwyn — legendary name of Ermid's son.
  • Greid — legendary name of Eri's son.
  • Cúmheá — (kuhm-EH) "hound of the plains". Cooey, Cuulagh, Cooley, Cullo, Covey.
  • Parthalán — Scottish Gaelic form of Bartholomew.
  • Amhlaidh — Scottish Gaelic form of Olaf, an Old Norse name introduced to Ireland by Viking settlers. Aulay.
  • Anwas — name of the father of Twrch in ancient legends.
  • Meilseoir — (MEL-shyahr)(H) "king". Melchior.
  • Seosamh — (SHOH-sav) "god will add"; Irish form of Joseph. Seosaph.
  • Aodhfin — (EH-fin or AY-fin) "white fire".
  • IODOCUS m Ancient Celtic (Latinized) Latinized form of Judoc (see JOYCE).
  • Cerwyn — (KER-win) possibly means "black" or "white".
  • Blair — from a surname; from Gaelic blar "plain, field, battlefield"; or "child of the fields". Blaire, Blayre.
  • Tad — "father". Tadd.

  • Griflet — name of one of the first Knights; King Arthur accepted him even though he was very young.
  • Raibeart — (RAB-burt or RAH-bercht) "of shining fame"; Gaelic form of Robert. Clan Robertson takes its name from Robert Riach (Grizzly Robert) who lived in the 15th C. Raibert; nicknames are Rab, Rabbie.
  • Ailill — (AL-ill) "sprite"; name of a legendary king of Connacht and husband of Medb.
  • Austeyn — (AWS-ten) Manx form of Augustine.
  • Arthur — of Celtic origin. King Arthur, British king of 5th C. or 6th C. The name was first found in the Latinized form Artorius and its derivation is obscure.
  • Blyth — (BLIITH) from Cornish word for "wolf". Blythe.
  • Efflam — (AY-flahm) Prob. derived from Celtic flamm "flame". In legend, Efflam was a 6th C. Irish prince who took religious vows and travelled Brittany, where he defeated a dragon by invoking God's name and brought forth a sacred spring.
  • Amerawdwr — from a word meaning "emperor".
  • Arianwyn — (ah-ree-AHN-win) from Welsh arian "silver" + gwyn "shining, holy".
  • Arglwydd — from the word meaning "lord".
  • Garanhon — legendary name of Glythvyr's son.
  • Alasdair — (ALL-us-tir) "defender of mankind"; Gaelic evolution of Greek name Alexander. Scottish royal name in 12th C. when Alexander I took the throne. MacAlisters claim descent from Alasdair Mor (d. 1299), son of Donald of Islay, Lord of the Isles. Alister, Alistair, Alastair, Alaisdair, Alisdair, Alastair, Allaster, Alaster, Alasdair (AHL-uhs-duhr), Alexander; pet form Aly; feminine form Alastrina.
  • Olier — (OH-lyay) Breton form of the French name Olivier.
  • Bearnard — Irish, Scots-Gaelic form of Bernard; from the Old German words Beirn-hard "brave as a bear".
  • Conall — (KAW-nal) "strong as a wolf" or "high-might"; from Old Irish cu (con) "hound, wolf". Conall Cernach was a legendary hero of Ulster. Conall Gulban was the great-grandfater of St. Colm Cille and the ancestor of the O'Donnells, O'Gallaghers, and O'Dohertys. Connell.
  • Curran — (Gael) derived from a word for "hero". Currey, Curr, Curney.
  • DRUST m Ancient Celtic Pictish name probably derived from Celtic drest meaning "riot" or "tumult"... 
  • Dearg — "son of the Dagda".
  • Torn — Irish version of Torrence. Toran.
  • Maitiú — (MATH-yoo)(H) "gift of god"; version of Matthew.
  • Teregud — name of one of Iaen's sons in old stories.
  • Shanahan — (SHAN-ah-han) "clever, wise". Seanachan (SHAWN-a-kahn?).
  • Antain(e) — Irish Gaelic cognate of English Anthony.
  • Bernez — (BAYR-nes) Breton form of Bernard.
  • Gerwin — "fair love". Gerwyn.
  • GALL Celtic: Stranger; Saint Gall was one of the numerous seventh-century Irish monks who brought Christianity and learning back to Europe...
  • Avaon — in Welsh tradition, the name of Taliesin's son.
  • Malone — "church-going" or "servant of St. John". Maloney.
  • Comhghall — (KOH-gahn or CO-en) "fellow hostage".
  • ARTHFAEL m Ancient Celtic Welsh form of ARMEL
  • Daimine — (day-min?) derived from word dam "deer" or "ox". Daimhin, Damon.

  • Dirmyg — legendary name of one of Caw's sons.
  • Daniel — (H) "beloved".
  • Cailean — (KAH-luhn) from Old Irish cuilen "pup, cub, kitten" or "child". Favorite of Campbells and MacKenzies; 1st Campbell chief of Lochawe, Cailean Mor, was killed in a battle with the MacDougals in 1294, since then the chief of the clan has been MacCailein Mor "Son of Big Cailean". Cael, Caelin, Callean, Colin, Cailean (CAL-lan).
  • Wella — (WEL-ah) Cornish nickname for William.
  • Glewlwyd — Arthur's gatekeeper in the Culhwch and Olwen myth.
  • Modred — name of King Arthur's son by Morgause, his half-sister. He was raised with his half-brothers, the other children of Morgause and Lot. Arthur killed him at the Battle of Camlan. Mordred.
  • Oisin — (oh-SHEEN) from Old Irish oisin "fawn" or "deer". Finn mac Cumhaill's son, was poet of the Fianna. Two saints by this name (Oissine). Oissine, Ossian.
  • Maelogan — (may-LOH-gahn) "divine prince"; from Welsh mael "prince" + -on, a divine ending. Maelon (MAY-lon).
  • Braden — modern spelling of Bhradain, "salmon".
  • Madawg — name of Teithyon's son in old legends. Madoc.
  • GWRTHEYRN m Ancient Celtic Means "supreme king" from Welsh gor "over" and teyrn "king, monarch"... 
  • Carlus — (OFr) "full-grown, manly".
  • Nioclás — (NEE-klahs)(Gr) "victory of the people". Nicholas.
  • Nele — (NAYL) Manx form of Irish name Niall.
  • Laoire — (LAY-re, LEER-ee, LAIR-ee, L'Heery) from Old Irish name Laegaire, may mean "calf-herder". Name of two saints and a king of Tara. Leary, Laoighaire, Laoghaire.
  • English: Friend of the sea
  • Keelan — from a word meaning "slender" or "little".
  • Dominic — (L) "like the Lord". Damhlaic.
  • Arailt — Scots-Gaelic form of Harold.
  • Daley — (day-lee) possibly "advisor", "an assembly" or "a valley". Dawley, Dale, Daly.
  • Mayo — from the County in Ireland, meaning "yew-tree plain".
  • Montgomery — Name of a Scottish clan descended from Robert de Montgomerie; name comes from a French name which in turn is based on a German name, thus it contains the French mont "hill" and the German guma "man" + ric "power".
  • Sayer — from the word for "carpenter".
  • Trahern — "incredibly strong" or "strong as iron".
  • Tiomóid — (TEE-mohd)(Gr) "honors god". Timothy, Tim.
  • Forbes — (Gael) "prosperous or headstrong".
  • Ceard — from the Gaelic word for "smith". Ceardach.
  • Aedan — (Scot) a King of Scots in 560. see Aidan.
  • Hearn — shortened form of Ahearn, which means "lord of the horses".
  • Andrev — (ahn-DRAY-oh) Breton form of Andre. Drev (DRAY-oh).
  • Aodh — (EH or AY) from Old Irish aed "fire". Another name for the god The Dagda in Irish myth. Borne by six high kings and twenty saints in early Ireland. Name of two Irish rebels in Queen Elizabeth I's time, Aogh (Hugh) O'Neill and Aodh Rua (Red Hugh) O'Donnell. Anglicized as Hugh, Ea.
  • Morann — (MOOR-an) from Old Irish name Morand, derivation unknown. Legendary judge of ancient Ireland who allegedly never gave a false verdict. Also the name of several if Finn mac Cumhaill's warriors. Moran, Morand.
  • Torquil — "Thor's kettle"; from Gaelic Torcaill (THOR-kil) fr. Norse name based on the god Thor. Torquil was the name of the founder of Clan MacLeod of Lewis, and a popular name for the men of that clan. Torcuil, Torkill.
  • Tristram — "sorrowful". The tragic tale of Tristram (Tristan in Arthurian legend) and Isolde; he was the son of King Meliodas and Queen Elizabeth of Lyonnesse and went to his uncle King Mark in Cornwall after his country sand under the ocean. There, he fell in love with Isolde, his uncle's wife, and caused a great scandal. He served King Arthur for a time, but went to Brittany where he was mortally wounded.
  • Nemhglan — the bird-like being who was teh father of Conaire Mess Buachalla by a human woman.
  • Cullen — "young animal, handsome".
  • Andreays — (ahn-DRAY-uhs) Manx form of Greek name Andreas.
  • Giolla Deacair — (GIL-a dah-keer?) an Otherworld champion who owned a horse that could not be ridden. The hero Conan managed to mount the horse, but it carried him away to Tir Tairngire, and had to be rescued by Fionn.
  • Grady — (Gael) from a word meaning "noble" or "illustrious". Gradleigh, Gradey.

  • Bearnárd — (BEHR-nard)(OGer) "having the courage of a bear". Barney; Irish, Scottish Gaelic form of Bernard.
  • Eiladar — legendary name of Penn Llarcan's son.
  • Angus — "unique choice, chosen one, unique strength", from Old Irish Oengus: oen "one" + gus "vigor". Scottish and Irish; anglicized form of Gaelic Aonghus/Aonghas (EUN-eu-uss), composed of Celtic elements meaning "one" and "choice". Name of an old Celtic god, and is first recorded as a personal name in Adomnan's "Life of St. Columba," where it occurs in the form Oinogus(s)ius as the name of a man for whom the saint prophesied a long life and a peaceful death. Almost certainly the name of an 8th C. Pictish king variously recorded as Omnust and Hungus. traditional first name in Scotland, and of the men of clan Donald, whose ancestors include Angus Og of Islay. Short form Gus; pet form Angie; feminine form Angusina.
  • Gilleasbuig — (GEEL-yes-pick) "genuine or bold"; variant of Old German Archibald.
  • Imar — (EE-MAHR?) probably the name Ivarr borrowed from the Norse-Vikings who invaded Ireland. Iomhar (EE-var).
  • Henson — "Henry's son"; surname adopted as a first name. Henderson.
  • Eochaid — (OH-kad) from Old Irish ech "horse". May mean "horse rider". Real and legendary kings bore this name, horses were symbols of kingship and nobility in early Irish culture. Also a St. Eochaid who was bishop of Tallaght, and another who was the abbot of Lismore. Eochaidh.
  • Siawn - name of Iaen's son in old tales.
  • FEIDLIMID m & f Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology Possibly means "beauty" or "ever good" in Irish Gaelic... 
  • Rosse — (Gael) "headland". Rossell.
  • Glew — name of Ysgawd's son in old stories.
  • Judikael — (zhoo-dee-KA-el) from Old Breton iud "lord, chief" + hael "generous". A 7th C. Breton king who left the throne for a life of monastic solitude.
  • BRIANA Celtic: Strong or ascends; feminine form of Brian
  • Ermid — name of the son of Erbin in legends.
  • Vaughn — (Celt) "small". Vaughan.
  • Bowen - "son of Owen".
  • Samzun — (SAHM-zoon) from biblical name Samson. 6th C. St. Samson was born in Wales and led a footloose existence, establishing churches in Britain, Ireland and northern France. In Brittany, he founded the famous abbey of Dol.
  • MÁEL MÁEDÓC m Ancient Irish Means "disciple of Saint MÁEDÓC" in Irish... 
  • Clust — name of the son of Clustveinydd in legends.
  • Addolgar — "devout".
  • Breton Celtic Male Names
  • Syvwlch — legendary name of Cleddyv Kyvwich's son.
  • Ceallach — (KAL-ak?) "bright-headed". Cellach, Kelly.
  • Menguy — (MAYN-gee) Old Breton men "stone" + ki "hound, wolf".
  • Bowen — "son of Owen". Bowie, Bowe.
  • Glaisne — (GLAS-nee) a favored name in Ulster up to modern times. Glasny.
  • Gorthelyk — (gohr-THEL-ik) Cornish for "very beloved". Name found in the Bodmin Manumissions*.
  • Gorneves — (gohr-NEV-ez) from British vornemetos "very holy".
  • Beda — Welsh version of Bede, a famous monk and historian.
  • BRÉANAINN m Ancient Irish Old Irish form of BRENDAN
  • Murdoch — (Murdo-archaic) "sea protector" or "sea fighter". Murdo, Murchadh.
  • Gilbrid — (gil-BREED) "servant of Saint Brigid".
  • Ciarrai — (KEH-ehr-ree) masculine version of the Irish County Kerry.
  • Fiachra — (FEE-uh-khruh) "battle-king" or "eagle". Irish saint name. Fiachna, Fiach, Feary.
  • Baudwin — one of the later Knights of the Round Table, he came from Brittany ans was a very skilled surgeon. He survived the battle of Camlan, and became a hermit.
  • Forbeis — (FOR-bish) "headstrong". Clan name fr. the Gaelic place word forba "field" + suffix of location -ais. Forbes.
  • Aluinn — (AH-loo-in) "handsome" or "cheerful"; Scottish of Celtic origin, possibly a dim. of a word meaning "rock". Ailean, Alan, Allan, Allen (generally only found as a surname in Britain, but equally common as a given name in the USA).
  • Tremayne — "lives in the house by the rock". Tremen.

  • Bedwyr — name of one of King Arthur's companions to whom he sometimes entrusted Excalibur.
  • Ailbe — (AL-vyuh or AL-fe)(OGer) "noble, bright". Ailbhe, Alvy, Albert.
  • Caoimhin — (kwee-VEEN) Old Irish Caemgen: caem "gentle" or "beautiful" + gein "birth". 7th C. St. Caemgen established the monastery at Glendalough in County Wicklow. Anglicized as Kevin. Caoimhghin, Kevin, Kevan.
  • Alec — (Gr) "defender of mankind"; short form of Alexander, now less popular then Alex, possibly because of the term "smart alec". Ailig, Alick.
  • French Origin
  • Cahan — derived from cath "battle" or "warrior".
  • Frang — (FRANG-g) form of the Teutonic name Frank, meaning "free".
  • Gwyn — (GWIN) from Welsh gwen, gwyn "white, shining, holy". Gwyn ap Nudd was the leader of the Wild Hunt and the lord of lost souls.
  • Naughton — "pure". Nachton, Nechtan.
  • Pembroke — (Celt) "bluff, headland".
  • Mirren — Modern form of the name of 6th C. St. Meadhran, who was active in Strathclydel; Mirren is the patron saint of football.
  • Sel — legendary name of Selgi's son.
  • Cairbre — (KAHR-bre or KAHR-bruh) "charioteer". First legendary Sons of Mil to settle in Ireland. Two noted saints by this name: Bishop of Assaroe and Bishop of Moville. Carbry.
  • BOUDICCA f Ancient Celtic Derived from Brythonic boud meaning "victory"... 
  • Ultan — "an Ulsterman".
  • Broderick — "son of the famous ruler". The name ap-Roderick appears often, signifying "son of Roderick".
  • Eòin — Scottish verstion of Jonathan. Johnathan, Jonathon.
  • Hydd — "deer".
  • Loghlin — (LAWX-luhn) from Old Irish Lochlainn, a name for the Vikings' homeland.
  • Donald — from Gaelic Domhnall (DAW-nuhl) derived fr. Old Irish domnan "world" + gal "valor"; "brown or dark"; or "proud ruler". Donald was an early Scottish royal name; Clan Donald, most powerful Highland clan, took the name from a 15th C. Donald, grandson of Somerled, Lord of the Isles. Don, Donn, Donall, Donalt, Donaugh, Donel, Donell, Dòmhnull, Dòmhnall, Dòmhnal (DAW-ull), Donaidh (Donnie).
  • Blair — "place". Blayre, Blaire.
  • Alpin — "attractive".
  • Colgrevance — a Knight of the Round Table who was slain when the Knights tried to capture Lancelot while he was in Guinevere's chamber.
  • Berwyn — the son of Kerenhyr in ancient tales.
  • Branwalather — (bran-wa-LATH-uhr) from Cornish bran "raven" + walather "leader". A saint and son of a Cornish king named Kenen.
  • Eavan — "fair form".
  • Darach — from the Gaelic word for "oak".
  • Gair — from a word meaning "short". Gare.
  • Quinn — "wise"; variant of Conn, and the old spelling Cuinn.
  • Lawler — from an Irish word meaning "mutterer" or "soft-spoken". Lawlor.
  • Maolmuire — "servant of Mary"; or "dark-skinned".
  • Tristan — (TREE-stahn) Popular in Brittany, from the name of the hero of the tale of Tristan and Isolde. Tanick (TAH-neek).
  • Athol — transferred use of the name of a Perthshire district, seat of the dukes of Atholl. The placename is thought to derive from the Gaelic ath Fodla "new Ireland". Atholl, Athole.
  • BRADÁN m Ancient Irish Derived from Irish Gaelic meaning "salmon".
  • Rhychdir — "from the plow land".
  • Hurley — (Gael) from a word for "sea tide". Hurlee.
  • Ronan — from Old Irish ron "seal" + dim. suffix -an. An early St. Ronan, bishop of Kilmaronen in Lennox, was said to have driven out the devil out of the valley of Innerleithen. Renan, Ronat.
  • Kynedyr — name of the son of Hetwn in legends.
  • BRIAN m Irish, English, Ancient Irish The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble"... 
  • Drwst — obscure name from Welsh tales.
  • Cailean — (KAL-lan)(Gael) from Gaelic word for "child". Cailan, Colin.

  • Culloden — personal name from the placename of Culloden, meaning "from the nook of the marsh".
  • Fordyce — from a surname based on a place in Banffshire.
  • Craiftine — (krayf-teen?) harper to Labraid Longseach; his harp was made of wood that had retained a secret about the king.
  • Campbell — (KAM-bel) from cam "crooked" + beul "mouth". A clan name that is also used a first name. Cambeul, Cam, Camp.
  • Collen — (KOLH-en) Welsh word for "hazel tree". Name of a 6th C. saint.
  • Scott — "a Scotsman" or "from Scotland". Scot.
  • Bors — son of the king of Benoic and cousin to Lancelot. He was one of the best Knights of the Round Table along with Galahad and Perceval.
  • Lorcan — (LOR-kawn) from Old Irish lorc "fierce" or "cruel" + dim. suffix -an. Several early kings with this name. St. Lorcan O Tuathail (Laurence O'Toole) was archbishhop of Dublin at the time of the Norman invasion.
  • Dewey — "beloved"; form of David.
  • Gromer — a powerful shapeshifter and magician who captured Arthur in the story of Gawain and Dame Ragnell.
  • Duach — name of Gwawrddur's son in old legends.
  • Alan — "handsome" or "peaceful".
  • Eilig — from a word meaning "from the deer pass".
  • Celyn — (KEL-in) Welsh word for "holly". Celyn ap Caw was a member of Arthur's court in the medievel tale Kulhwch and Olwen.
  • Macarthur — "son of Aruthur". Mcarthur, McArthur, MacArthur.
  • Kane — from a Welsh word for "beautiful".
  • Griffin — (GRIFF-in) from the mythological beast. From Welsh cryf "strong" + udd "lord". Several medieval rulers bore Gruffudd, a variant.
  • Tyree — from a Gaelic word meaning "island dweller". Tyrae, Tyrai, Tyrea.
  • Fionntan — (FIN-tan or FYUN-tawn) from Old Irish finn "bright, fair". In myth, Fintan was the consort of Cessair. Fintanwas the only one of the group to survived the great flood. Afterwards, he lived on for thousands of years as a salmon, an eagle and a hawk. Also the name of 74 early Irish saints.
  • Myghal — (muh-HAYL) Cornish form of Michael.
  • Morthwyl — from a word meaning "hammer".
  • Bairre — (BAW-re) form of names Bearach and Finnbarr, also used as a name in its own right; anglicized as Barry; Barra.
  • Mongan — son of Manannan mac Lir and Caintigerna; some tales say he was the reincarnation of Finn mac Cumhail.
  • Sior — (SHOR) Welsh form of George, "farmer".
  • Art — Irish and Scottish, now as an informal shortening of Arthur.
  • Nealcail — from Gaelic words meaning "victorious people".
  • Lawren — "crowned with laurel". Lawrence.
  • Durell — "king's doorkeeper". Dorrell, Durial, Durrell.
  • Donan — (DOH-nan) Name of a disciple of St. Briec. Tonan.
  • Ivar — from Gaelic form, Iomhair (EE-uh-vuhr), of the Old Norse Ivarr, meaning "yew tree army"; traditional first name in clan Campbell of Strachan, and also the source of the surname MacIver. Ivor.
  • Culhwch — (COOL-oo) son of Kilydd in old tales.
  • CAOMHÁN m Ancient Irish Diminutive of CAOMH... 
  • Rheged — legendary name of Gwres' father.
  • Aidan — Fr. Old Irish aed "fire" + dim. -an. Very old Scottish name. King Aidan mac Gabran, ruled Argyll in the 6th C., first Christian Monarch in the British Isles outside Ireland. 7th C. St. Aidan established the celebrated monastery of Lindisfarne. Aedan.
  • Conleth, Conley — (KAWN-lay, KOHN-leth) from old and rare name Conlaed. Most famous bearer Conlaed, a 6th C. bishop of Kildare, head of school of manuscript illumination there.
  • SEISYLL m Ancient Celtic Old Welsh form of SEXTILIUS
  • Rhobert — Welsh form of Robert, "brilliant, renowned".
  • Cathal — Fr. Old Irish cath "battle". Ancient first name is source of the surname Macall.
  • Budoc — (BOO-dok) from Celtic bud "victory". Son of St. Azenor. Founded a monastery on the island of Lavret, and became a celebrated teacher. Budog.
  • ÁED m Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology Older form of AODH
  • Kent — "white".
  • Arian — "silver"; masculine version of Arianrhod.
  • Digon — son of Alar in old tales.
  • Callough — (KAHL-uh) "bald". Calvagh, Calbhach (KAHL-ahkh).
  • Innis — "from the island". Innes, Iniss.
  • Neb — name of one of Caw's sons.
  • Corryn — "spider".
  • Robat — (ROB-at) Welsh form of Robert. Nickname Robyn (ROB-een). The 15th C. Robyn Ddu (Black Robin) and the 19th C. Robyn Ddu Eryri (Black Robin of Snowdonia) were noted Welsh poets. Robet.
  • Rigard — (RIG-uhrd) Manx form of Richard.
  • Brathach — name of the son of Gwawrddur in old tales.
  • Fergal — (FAYR-gal) "man of strength"; from Old Irish fer "man" + gal "fury, valor" = "manly" or "valorous". Fergal mac Mael Duin was another ancestor of the O'Neills. Fearghal.
  • Home — "from the cave". Hume.
  • Murtagh — (MUR-tah or MUR-taw) variant of Murdock. Murtaugh.
  • Gwallawg — name of Llenawg's son in old tales.
  • Eremon — (EHR-eh-mohn) he fought his brother Eber to see who should become the king of Ireland. All later Irish kings claimed descent from him.
  • Pasco, Pascow — (PAS-kaw) from Cornish Padk "Easter". Popular until mid-18th C.
  • Torrance — (Gael) "tender, gracious, good, from the knolls"; form of Terrence. Torrans, Tory.
  • Balloch — from a word meaning "from the pasture".
  • Criofan — (KREE-fan) from Old Irish name Criomhthann (CROH-an or CRONE) old, rare name meaning "a fox". Crimthan was common among the Kavanaghs of Leinster. First name of St. Columcille; St. Criomhthann's feast day is May 23. Crimthann was the name of ten of Finn mac Cumhaill's warriors, and of one St. Crimthann/Criomhthann. Crimthan, Crimthann, Crimathann.
  • Moesen — Welsh version of Moses, "from the water".
  • Eurosswydd — name in old Welsh tales.
  • Dorrell — "king's doorkeeper".
  • Ryol — (REE-ol) from British rigalis "king". Name of the king in the Cornish drama Bewnans Meryasek. Also found in the Bodmin Manumissions* as a personal name.
  • Shea — (SHAY) "courteous" or "hawk-like, stately". Seaghda, Shae, Shaye, Shay.
  • Bhatar — (VAH-tuhr) Fr. Germanic wald "rule" + harja "folk". Usually associated with Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832). Moderately popular as a first name in Scotland. Walter.
  • Murry — "sailor" or "man of the sea"; from a clan name. MacMurray, Moray, Murry, Morogh.
  • Devnet — "poet".
  • Dubaltach — "black-jointed" or "dark-limbed". Dubhaltach, Dualtach.
  • Delaney — "descendant of the challenger".
  • Ross — (RAWS) from Old Irish ros "promontory". Popular; borne by kings, heroes, saints. Ross MacMahon, Archbishop of Armagh was an opponent of Cromwell.
  • Dubgall — (DOO-ahl) "dark or black foreigner"; refers to the Vikings, esp. from Denmark, who came to Dublin in 850. Dubghall.
  • Avagdu — "utter darkness"; son of the goddess Cerridwen and god Tegid Foel. Afagddu, Morfran (great crow).
  • Gannon — (Gael) "light or fair-complexioned". Gannie.
  • Anfri — "disgrace".
  • Lonan — (LAWN-uhn) from Old Irish lon "blackbird" + dim. -an. 6th C. Irish St. Lonan was noted for a large library.
  • Colla — an ancient Irish name.
  • Íoseph — (YO-sef)(H) "god will add". Iosep, Joseph.
  • Roibín — (ROH-bin) dim. or Roibeard. Robin.
  • Strahan — "minstrel". Sruthan, Strachan.
  • Illiam — (IL-yuhm) Manx form of William.
  • Iain — (ee-AYN or EE-an) "God's gracious gift"; Gaelic form of John. Ian, Iaian, Ianv.
  • Téadóir — (TEH-dohr)(Gr) "divine gift".
  • Hoel — (HOH-el) Popular name among the Dukes of Brittany, also the name of Morgan la Fay's father in several medieval French Arthurian tales.
  • Leslie — Poss. fr. Celtic lis "court" + celyn "holly"; possibly "(from the) gray fortress" or "small meadow". Usu. spelled Lesley for a woman, Leslie for a man. Lesley.
  • ÁEDÁN m Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology Older form of AODHÁN... 
  • Gorlas — (GOHR-laz) Cornish for "very pure". Name of the first husband, the Duke of Cornwall, of Ygerna, mother of King Arthur. Gorlois.
  • Kermit — possibly a variant of Dermot, or may mean "son of Diarmaid" or "free man".
  • Aodh — (OOH) Fr. Old Irish aed "fire". Frequent name in early Scotland; surname Mackay is based on it. Aoidh, Hugh.
  • Iomhair — (EE-uh-var) from the Teutonic name Ivor, "archer". Ivar, Iver, Ivor.
  • Tudi — (TO-dee) 6th C. saint who gave his name to Loctudy and l'Ile-Tudy. Tudy.
  • MÁEL SECHLAINN m Ancient Irish Variant of MÁEL SECHNAILL
  • Ffransis — (FRAWN-sis) Welsh form of Francis. Nickname Frank is Ffranc in Welsh.
  • Cluny — (kloo-nee) from a word meaning "meadow".
  • LÓEGAIRE m Irish Mythology, Ancient Irish Means "calf herder", derived from Irish loagh "calf"... 
  • Garvey — from a word meaning "rough place". Gairbith.
  • Malew — (mah-LOO) from Old Irish ma "my" + the god-name Lugh. Early Manx saint; Kirk Malew (Malew Church) is dedicated to him.
  • Kern — (Gael) "little black one, dark". Kearn, Kerne, Kieran.
  • Eivyonydd — a name out of old tales.
  • CAMERON Cameron is the name of a great Highland clan that means (you guessed it) "crooked nose", which, as everyone knows, adds character...
  • Ahearn — "lord of the horses". Aherin, Hearn.
  • Pencast — (PEN-cast) Cornish word for Pentecost. Popular until late 19th C.
  • Cadwgawn — legendary name of the son of Iddon.
  • Bedyw — name of the son of Seithved in legends.
  • Chattan — from the Gaelic word for "cat"; clan name that is used as a first name also. Chait.
  • Chad — (Celt) "defender".
  • Meical — (MAYK-al) Modern Welsh form of Michael. Older form Mihangel (mi-HAHNG-el); nickname Meic (MAYK).
  • Kilian — (KIL-yan) from Old Irish Cillene, prob. from cell "church". Many saints bore this name including an abbott of Iona in Scotland. Cillene, Killian, Killy.
  • Stewart — (A.S.) "caretaker or steward". Originally an occupational name, borne by keepers of the Scottish royal house. Later changed to a hereditary family name, then became a royal name as the House of Stuart ruled Scotland in 1371, and England from 1603-1714. Occasionally used as a girl's first name. Stiubhart, Stuart.
  • Pádruig — (PAH-dreek or PA-trik ) "noble"; the ancient origin meaning translates to "stone" or "anchor stone". Scottish form of the Irish name Padraig (PAH-dreek), and English Patrick. Pádraig, Pahdraig, Padyn, Paton, Padan.
  • Dáire — (DEH-ruh, DI-re or DAHR-uh) Old Irish word meaning "oak grove", "fruitful" or "fertile", and most likely the name of an early fertility or bull god; the Brown Bull of Cooley was owned by Daire mac Fiachna, and his refusal to loan his bull to Queen Medb was part of the reason for the fight between the Ulsterman and the men of Ireland. Dary, Darragh.
  • Fiontan — possibly "white ancient" or "white fire".
  • Murray — (MUR-ee or MUR-ray)(Celt) "seaman". Murry, Murrey..
  • Peissawg — name of a king of Brittany in legends.
  • Gavin — "white hawk" or "hawk of the battle".
  • Y — form of Aodh, found in 15th C. documents.
  • Cadan — (KAHD-an) from British cad "battle".
  • Mundy — (MUN-dee) "from Reamonn".
  • Mel — (MEL) no recorded meaning; St. Mel was a bishop and patrion of Ardagh, County Limerick, and a nephew of St. Patrick.
  • Mahon — (MAN or MAH-hohn) "bear".
  • Roy — (ScGael) from the Galeic word ruadh "red".
  • Eóin — (OH-en or OH-een) "god's gracious gift". Irish form of Latin Johannes. Irish names Eoin and Sean both derive from Johannes. Sean, from the French Jehan, was introduced to Ireland by Norman French centureis after Johannes became an Irish name. John.
  • Machar -"plain". Machair.
  • Torin — "chieftain". Toryn.
  • Buthek, Bithek — (BITH-ek) from Celtic bud "victory". Name of a Breton saint venerated in Cornwall. Masculine equiv. of the name of Queen Boudicca of the Iceni, who led a rebellion against the Romans in 60 AD.
  • Aed — derived from the word aedh "fire"; common in early Ireland; name of several early saints, and four Ui Neill High Kings.
  • CORRAIDHÍN m Ancient Irish Means "little spear", derived from Irish corradh "spear" and a diminutive suffix.
  • Donnan — Fr. Old Irish donn meaning "brown" or "chief" + dim. -an. Name of 7th C. abbot of Iona who founded many churches in Scotland.
  • EVELYN Evelyn is a romantic and feminine name that is making a comeback from it's super popular days a century ago, perhaps due...
  • Neythen — (NII-then) Name of a Cornish saint, who, according to legend, was beheaded by a group of robbers he was trying to convert. Neythen then picked up his head and walked the half mile back to his hut.
  • CARATACOS m Ancient Celtic Derived from the Celtic element car meaning "love"... 
  • Gorlois — the Duke of Cornwall and Igerna's husband, the woman whom Uther Pendragon coveted. Father of Morgan, Morgause, and Elaine.
  • Druce — "son of Dryw". Drywsone.
  • Éibhear — (EH-ver) meaning unknown, perhaps (OE) "strong as a bear". Ever.
  • Carney — "fighter".
  • Casey — (kay-see) "brave".
  • Gaelic Origin
  • Credne — (kred-nee?) a bronzesmith god of the Tuatha De Danann and one of the triad of smiths. He helped Dian Cecht make the silver arm for Nuada.
  • Jamie — (H) "the supplanter"; Scottish variation of James and Seumas.
  • Kenzie — "wise leader"; related to the clan name Mackenzie.
  • Gale — "a stranger". Gael, Gaile, Gayle.
  • Alawn — "harmony".
  • Kirk — Scottish word for "church". Kerk.
  • Gleis — legendary name of Merin's son.
  • Daray — (Gael) "dark"; version of French-Norman name D'aray. D'aray, Dar, Darce.
  • Heulyn — (HIIL-een) "ray of sunshine".
  • Seòras — (SHAW-russ) Scottish form of George, "farmer".
  • Kynlas — name of Kynan's son in old tales.
  • Galen — (gay-len)(Gael) "calm"; or "small but lively".
  • Robart — (RAWB-urht) Manx form of Robert; nickname Robyn (RAWB-uhn).
  • Pyrs — Welsh form of Pierce, "stone" or "rock".
  • Casnar — name of a nobleman in old tales.
  • Jory — (JOH-ree) Cornish nickname for George.
  • Brodie — from the Irish Gaelic word for "from the ditch".
  • Gilvaethwy — name of one of the goddess Donn's sons. He lusted after his Uncle Math's virgin foot-holder and caused a war between Gwynedd and Dyfed in an attempt to get her. His punishment was to undergo shapeshifts into various animals, and to bear young.
  • Edmyg — "honor".
  • MÁEDÓC m Ancient Irish Meaning unknown... 
  • Cecil — (see-sill)(L) "blind". Siseal (SEE-sil).
  • Naoise — (NEE-shah?) son of Uisliu and served Conchobhar mac Ness, King of the Ulaidh; fell in love with Deirdre, who was promised to the king, and had to flee for his life. When they returned under a promise of forgiveness, Naoise was ambushed and killed. Naoisi.
  • Cian — (KEEN or KEE-an) from Old Irish cian "ancient, enduring". In legend, Cian was the son of Dian Cecht, god of healing of the Tuatha De Danaan. Also the father of the hero Lugh. Cianan (KEE-nahn, Céin, Cain, Kian, Kioan, Keon, Kean.
  • Cadyryeith — "well-spoken".
  • NUALLÁN m Ancient Irish Derived from Irish nuall "noble, famous" combined with a diminutive suffix.
  • Jonathan — (H) "god gives".
  • Finnegan — "light skinned".
  • Feidhlim — (FELL-em) "fortunate, lucky" or "ever good". Male or female name. Feidhlimidh.
  • Abbán — (A-bahn or ah-BAN) "little abbot".
  • Gillanders — Gaelic Gille Anndrais (gil-yuh OWN-drish), "servant of St. Andrew".
  • Eoghan — (YO-wun)(Gr) "well-born". Owen.
  • Amynedd — "patient". Amyneddgar.
  • Cadellin — name of the son of Gweir in legends.
  • Geordan — Scottish form of Gordon.
  • Kennard — "brave chieftain". Kenner.
  • Wyllow — (WIL-oh) Name of a 6th C. saint. The church of Lanteglas is dedicated to him.
  • Greagoir — (GREG-or) "vigilant" or "fierce". Grioghar, Gregory, Gregor; pet form: Greg.
  • Eòsaph — Scottish form of Joseph.
  • Tomaisin — (TA-ma-seen)(H) "twin"; Irish version of Thomas. Tommy.
  • Eirnin — possibly from iarn "iron"; male or female.
  • Carnedyr — legendary name of the son of Govynyon.
  • Gethin — (GETH-in) from Welsh cethin "dark, dusky". Geth.
  • Bruce — (Fr) "woods"; derived fr. a surname based on the place name, Braose (now Brieuse) in Normandy, and brought to Scotland by the Normans; most famous Bruce was Robert Bruce, King of Scots from 1306-29, who liberated Scotland fr. English rule at the Battle of Bannockburn.
  • Bothan — from a Gaelic word for "from the stone house".
  • Tynan — from the word "dark".
  • GLENN Celtic: From the valley
  • Drem — "sight".
  • Brendan — (BRAYN-dahn) After 5th C. Irish St. Brendan the Navigator.
  • Morgannwg — "from Glamorgan".
  • Dermot — "free man" or "free from envy". Dermod, Darby, Darcy.
  • Jamys — (JAY-muhs) Manx form of James.
  • Ruarc — (ROO-ark) from Old Irish arg "champion, hero", and source of surname O'Rourke. Anglicized Rourke, Roarke.
  • Ogma — known as Sun-Face and Honey-Mouthed, similar to the Greek hero Hercules. He carried a huge club and was the champion of the Tuatha De Danann. Legend says he created the Ogham script alphabet.
  • Parthalán — (PAR-ha-lahn)(Aramaic) "ploughman". Parlan, Bartholomew, Bartley.
  • Corey — (kohr-ee) "ravine"; sometimes translated as "seething pool". Cori, Cory.
  • Steffan — Welsh form of Stephen, "crowned with laurels".
  • Llara — from a word meaning "meek".
  • Ferris — (fair-is)(Gr) "the rock"; form of Peter. Farris.
  • Aindrea — Scots-Gaelic form of Andrew, "strong"; also Anndra.
  • Marcan — (MOR-kawn) from Old Irish marc "horse" + dim. -an. Marcan mac Cennetig was the brother of High King Brian Boru and abbot of Killaloe. St. Marcan of Clonenagh's Feast day — October 21.
  • Arc'hantael — (ahr-XAHN-tel) from Old Breton argant "silver, shining" + hael "noble, generous". Argantael (ahr-GAHN-tel).
  • Girec — (GEE-rik) St. Gireg, born in Wales in 547. He founded a monastery near Lanmeur and a hermitage near Ploudaniel. Gireg.
  • Melvin — (Celt) from an Irish word meaning "armored chief"; or "mill worker". Mal, Malvin, Melvyn, Melwynn.
  • Aglovale — son of King Pellinore, who Lancelot accidentally killed when Lancelot rescued Guinevere.
  • Amaethon — name of the son of the goddess Donn in Welsh legends.
  • ÓENGUS m Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology Old Irish form of AONGHUS
  • Doyle — (Celt) "dark stranger". Doy.
  • Jago — (JAHG-oh) Cornish form of Jacob.
  • Corentyn — (koh-REN-tin) Name of a Cornish born saint who became the first bishop of Quimper in Brittany.
  • Duer — "heroic".
  • Selwyn — (SEL-ween) from Welsh sel "ardor" + gwyn "shining, holy".
  • Colan, Collen — (KOHL-uhn) from Welsh collen "hazel tree". Name of a 7th C. Welsh saint. Popular until the 18th C.
  • Iucharba — a brother of Brian mac Tuirenn, who killed Lugh's father Cian.
  • Breck — "freckled". Brec, Brexton.
  • Rae — from an Old French word meaning "king".
  • Golvan — (GOHL-van) Cornish word for "sparrow", which is used as the bardic name of N.J.A. Williams, Cornish scholar, poet and playwright.
  • Caerwyn — (KIR-win or KAYR-win) from Welsh caer "fort" + gwyn "shining, holy".
  • Anndra — (AH-oon-drah) Scots-Gaelic form of Andrew, "manly". St. Andrew the Apostle is the patron saint of Scotland. Aindrea. Andra (Lowland form). Pet forms: Andy, Drew.
  • BOADICEA f Ancient Celtic (Latinized) Latinized form of BOUDICCA
  • Eocho — (OH-koh) Nickname for Eochaid that became its own name. Eocho mac Tairdelbaig was an ancestor of the O'Hallinan and O'Quinn families.
  • Eiddyl — name of unknown meaning in legends.
  • Deiniol — (DAYN-yol) Welsh form of Daniel. St. Deiniol was active in late 6th C. in N. Wales.
  • Prys — (PREES) from ap Rhys "son of Rhys". Price.
  • Tòmas — (TO-mass or TAW-muhs) "twin"; Gaelic form of Thomas. Tamhas, Tòmas, Tamlane (archaic).
  • ERIN Erin is one of those easy, breezy names that's remained moderately popular as a girl name. Meaning "peace," Erin is also...
  • Keallach — (KAL-ak?) "little Kelly". Killian.
  • Micheal — (mee-HAHL or MEE-kal) Irish form of Michael, "who is like God?"
  • Balmoral — taken from the placename, "from the majestic village".
  • Ross — from Gaelic place word ros "upland, promontory". Ross has been used as a first name in Scotland since the 12th C. Rosse, Rossell.
  • Govran — (GOH-vrahn) Old Breton word meaning "smith". 8th C. saint fr. Vannes. Gobrien (goh-BREE-en), Gobrian (goh-BREE-ahn).
  • Carmichael — "follower of Michael".
  • Kai — variant of Cei; possibly derived from a word meaning "fiery", others believe it means "keeper of the keys". Kay, Kei.
  • Coed — "dwells in the woods".
  • Arthur — (AHR-thir) from Celtic artos "bear", poss. from Latin name Artorius. Name of the legendary king and culture hero of the Welsh, Cornish, and Bretons. Arthwr, Arthvawr.
  • Tudur — (TID-ir) from Celtic teutorigos "king of the tribe". Tewdwr ap Giffri was a 10th C. king of Brecon. Tudur Aled was a renowned Welsh poet of the early Tudor era. Tudor (TID-or), Twedwr (tee-OO-door).
  • Belenus — (bel-eh-nuss) name of a sun and fire god similar to Greek Apollo and connected with the druids. His name is seen in Beltane, the May 1 festival.
  • Calum — (KA-luhm) from Latin columba "dove". 6th C. Irish missionary St. Columba (Colm Cille in Irish) founded a monastery on the island of Iona which became a great center of learning. Also used as a nickname for Malcolm. Callum.
  • Gruddyeu — name of Muryel's son in legends.
  • Dáithí — (DAH-hee) "swiftness, nimbleness". Dahy.
  • Selyf — Welsh version of Solomon, "peace".
  • Gerens — (GER-enz) from Celtic gerontios "old". Later Cornish form of Geraint.
  • Troy — from a word meanings "foot soldier".
  • Evan — either "young warrior" or "right-handed".
  • Cuirithir — a poet who loved a woman Liadin, but she refused to marry him and became a nun.
  • Cleit — from the Gaelic word for "rocky promontory".
  • Cavan — "handsome". From Caoimhin. Cavin.
  • Ennis — an alternate form of Angus.
  • Ossian — (UH-sheen) from the Old Irish name Oisin "little deer or fawn". This character of Irish legend was transformed into a Scottish hero in J. Macpherson's Ossianic poems.
  • Lughaidh — (LOO-ee)(OGer) "renowned warrior". Lewy.
  • Gwenvael — (GWAYN-vel) An Old Breton name, derived from gwenn "shining, holy" + mael "prince, chief". Name of a saint.
  • Tiernan — "lordly". Tierney.
  • Fergusson — "son of Fergus". Ferguson.
  • Gwilym — (GWIL-im) Welsh version of William.
  • Keir — (KEER)(Celt) "dark-skinned".
  • Gawain — a Knight of the Round Table, and a son of Lot and Morgause of Orkney. He was also known as Gwalchmai, "Hawk of May".
  • Taggart — from a word meaning "son of the priest".
  • Morc — son of Dela, a Fomor King.
  • Guinglain — only legitimate son of Gawain and Lady Ragnall; a Knight of the Round Table, and killed by Lancelot.
  • Tegid Foel — husband of the goddess Cerridwen, their home was under Lake Tegid.
  • Odhrán — (OH-rahn) from odhar "dun-colored"; from an old name for "otter"; or "pale green". Oran, Orrin, Odran.
  • Conran — St. Conran, 7th C. bishop and apostle to Orkney Islands.
  • Maelgwn — (MAYL-goon) "prince of the hounds"; from Welsh mael "divine prince" + ci (cwn) "wolf, hound". Maelgwn Gwynedd was a 6th C. Welsh king.
  • Jacca — (JAHK-uh) Cornish form of Jack.
  • Donyerth, Donyarth — (DON-yerth) Cornish form of the old British name Dubnogartos, probably meaning "black ridge".
  • CAISIDE m Ancient Irish Old Irish byname meaning "curly haired", from Irish Gaelic cas.
  • Sutherland — "southern land"; Norse-Viking name used by the Scots.
  • Parlan — Gaelic form of Old Irish name Partholon. This name is the source of the surnames Macfarland and Macfarlane.
  • Oscar — (OHS-car) from Old Irish os "deer", prob. meaning "one who loves deer"; or "warrior". Legendary warrior, grandson of Finn mac Cumhaill.
  • Afton — "from the Afton River".
  • Críostóir — (KRIS-ter)(Gr) "Christ-bearer"; version of Christopher. Criostal (Scotland & N. Ireland).
  • Fflewdwr — name of the son of Naw in old stories.
  • Edan — "fire".
  • Parlan — see Bartholomew "ploughman"; or Parthlán. Patholon, Parthalan (PAR-ha-lahn).
  • Énán — (AY-nahn) Irish saint name. Eanan (EH-nahn).
  • Léon — (L) "lion".
  • Alwyn — Welsh version of Alvin, "friend of all"; also the name of a river in Wales.
  • Drummond — "druid's mountain"; "at the ridge"; or from a surname based on a clan name that is derived from the name of the village of Drymen in Sterlingshire; used as a name in Scotland since the 13th C.
  • Leri — (LE-ree) Name of a 7th C. hermit saint. Lery.
  • Taffy — "beloved".
  • Llwch Llawwyanawc — a warrior who went with Arthur to retreive the great cauldron when it was stolen and taken to Annwn.
  • Bean — from a Celtic word for "spirit" or "fairy", and means "one who is white-skinned"; Scottish anglicized form of Gaelic name Beathan.
  • Cuilliok — (KWIL-yok) Cornish word for "soothsayer".
  • Lleu — a Welsh sun god Llew Llaw Gyffes, son of Arianrhod and an unnamed father and raised by his uncle Gwydion.
  • Iau — Welsh version of Zeus.

 

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